Pueblo County, Colorado
Insane Asylum Patients




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XY Z

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Tachirgi, Christ
patient race: W sex: M age: 56 marital:S place of birth: United States occupation: farm helper source: 1920 census

Taer, William A.
patient race: W sex: M age: 61 marital: M place of birth: Massachusettsnone source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Tafoya, Anita
patient gender F race W age 76 marital status Wd birthplace New Mexico source 1930 census

Tafoya, Lucia
patient gender F race Mex age 29 marital status M birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Tafoya, Pablo
patient race W gender M month born . year born 1856 age 44 marital status S place of birth New Mexico source : 1900 census

Tafoya, Pablo
patient race W gender M age 63 marital status M place of birth New Mexico occupation herder source 1910 census

Tafoya, Pablo
Denver Evening Post 12-11-1896 – Two Out of Three – Dr. Thomas H. Craven, Dr. F. M. Carrier and Dr. J. W. Reude, the committee of three appointed by the governor to examine into the mental condition of three convicts in the state penitentiary, reported to the governor to-day. They find John Keenan and Pablo Pafaya insane and John Reilly not insane.

Tafoya, Pablo
Denver Evening Post 12-12-1896 – Penitentiary to Asylum – Governor McIntire has ordered the transfer to the Pueblo asylum of John Keenan and Pablo Yafoya, now in the penitentiary, and who were yesterday declared insane.

Tafoya, Pablo
Rocky Mountain News 12-12-1896 – From Pen to Asylum – Governor McIntire has ordered John Keenan and Pablo Tafoya, two convicts in the penitentiary at Canon City, transferred to the insane asylum at Pueblo. The prisoners have been adjudged insane by a commission appointed to inquire into their mental condition.

Takahashi, Takasiro
patient race: Jp sex: M age: 39 marital:S place of birth: Japan occupation: none source: 1920 census

Talbot, Amy
Telluride Daily Journal 1-20-1904 – Mrs. Amy Talbot, daughter of Mrs. Babey, who has been home visiting with her mother for some time on account of ill health, was recently taken in charge by Sheriff Irving on the complaint of her being insane and fears being entertained for her mother's life.  Mrs. Talbot has been in this condition for three weeks and little hope is entertained of her recovery.  Doctor Mollin and Doctor Lof have been appointed to examine her as to her sanity and the trial will probably be held in a few days.  Mr. Talbot, her husband, is now in El Paso, Texas, where he has been located for some time. – Aspen Democrat.

Talbot, Amy
Aspen Weekly Times 1-9-1904 – Mrs. Amy Talbot is not improving from her serious illness of the past few weeks.

Talbot, Amy
Aspen Weekly Times 1-16-1904 – A Sad Case – Mrs. Amy Talbot, daughter of Mrs. Babey, who has been home visiting with her mother for some time on account of ill health, was on Tuesday taken in charge by Sheriff Irving on the complaint of her being insane and fears being entertained for her mother's life. Mrs. Talbot has been in this condition for three weeks and little hope is entertained for her recovery. Dr. Mollin and Dr. Lof have been appointed to examine her as to her sanity and the trial will probably be held in a few days. Mr. Talbot, her husband, is now in El Paso, Texas, where he has been located for some time. Mrs. Amy Talbot was adjudged insane in the county court Thursday afternoon and she was taken to Pueblo last evening by Sheriff Irving and Mrs. Arthur Hall where she will be palced in the state insane asylum or the Work sanitarium.

Talbot, Amy
Aspen Weekly Times 2-20-1904 – Adjudged Insane – The many friends of Mrs. Babey will sincerely deplore the fact that she was adjudged insane Saturday and was taken to the insane asylum Sunday evening by Sheriff Irving, where it is hoped she will improve and recover her sanity. Mrs. Babey has been a resident of this city for years and owns a great many business buildings in the city. It is thought the condition of her daughter who was adjudged insane some few weeks ago was the direct cause of her losing control of her mind. Another daughter, Mrs. Wiley, who recently came to the city to stay with her mother, is still in Aspen.

Talbot, Amy
Aspen Democrat 1-15-1904 Mrs. Amy Talbot was adjudged insane in the county court yesterday afternoon and she was taken to Pueblo last evening by Sheriff Irving and Mrs. Arthur Hull, where she will be placed in the state insane asylum or the Work sanitarium.

Talbot, Emma
Rocky Mountain News 2-28-1896 – Tried for Insanity – Downfall of a Demi-Mondaine from Morphine Excesses – Emma Talbot, formerly housekeeper for one of the wealthy denizens of Market street, and sometimes known as Maggie Chambers, was brought into the county court yesterday afternoon upon a rudely constructed stretcher of soap boxes. Maggie was tried for insanity and pronounced a lunatic. She has been confined in the county hospital for some time. Morphine brought about her condition.

Talbot, Gus
Dolores News 11-26-1881 - Gus Talbot, well-known throughout all San Juan, was recently adjudged insane by the county court and after consultation with the officers of the State Asylum at Pueblo, his admission was secured and on last Wednesday morning county commissioner Waggoner started with his charge for that place.  Talbot is an old-time San Juaner, and carried the mail between Lake City and Silverton some years ago.  He was one of the most expert snowshoers in the country.  He is the owner of a one fourth interest of the Jennie Parker mine (patented) on Sultan mountain near Silverton, which is a good piece of property.   Talbot has been insane for some years, the cause said to be injuries sustained from a caving in of a mine in which he was at work, whereby his skull was hurt sufficiently to impair the brain.   Others state that no bodily injury was received and that his insanity is the result of causes purely natural.  He was a native of Montreal, Canada, and leaves a wife and three children, who are almost destitute.

Talbot, Gus
Dolores News 5-13-1882 – Some little time ago the county officials received notification from the manager of the State Insane Asylum that Gus Talbot could not be cured and being perfectly harmless might as well be removed from the asylum.  Mrs. Talbot then left Rico to get her husband, since which time nothing was heard of the insane man until the receipt of last Saturday's Denver Republican, which contain, from his family at the Merchant's Hotel, was recaptured by Officer Wilcox last night.  Talbot was an inmate of the asylum at Pueblo up to within a short time ago, when his wife took him out under the impression that she could manage him. 

Talbot, Gus
Dolores News 12-3-1881 – A. A. Waggoner returned from Durango last Monday, having turned his insane charge over to Frank Raymond, who was en route to Denver.  Talbot was placed behind the bars of the Pueblo Insane Asylum on last Sunday forenoon.  The surgeon's certificate was returned.  Mr. Raymond is now at the St. James hotel in Denver, with a whole raft of Rico boys, who are not sleeping.

Talbot, Percy C.
patient race W gender M age 44 marital status M place of birth Canada occupation blacksmith source 1910 census

Talbot, Percy C.
Carbonate Chronicle 2-2-1920 – Insane Men Prisoners – Governor Shoup's Lunacy Commission Finds 26 Inmates of Canon Crazy – Ten of Them Serving Terms for Murder – Denver, Jan. 31. – Twenty-six inmates of the Colorado penitentiary were today declared insane in a report submitted to Governor Shoup by a special lunacy commission recently appointed by him.  All but ten of the inmates adjudged insane are serving terms for murder.  Among the twenty-eight adjudged insane are James Bulger, Denver soldier of fortune, who on the night of May 6, 1914, killed L. F. Nicodemus, then one of the proprietors of a local hotel, and Oren Slinde, a youth of 20 years, who slew his father and a hired man in a double murder on a farm seventeen miles northwest of Boulder on September 11, 1919.  Besides Bulger and Slinde, those convicted of murder who were adjudged insane are: Robert Buchanan, Frank Cantania, John Deitz, Felix Belfino, Lauro Garcia, Robert Hunt, M. Milobar, George Novac, Arthur Norman, James Oldham, J. C. Stewart, Louis Seeley, Al Scott and P. C. Talbot.  The others and the crimes for which they were sentenced are: B. A. Comstock, burglary; R. C. Davis, assault to kill; S. H. Shrader, burglary and larceny; G. Schneider, assault to rob; John East, burglary and larceny; J. Smelkert, obstruction of railroad property; Rose Chali, statutory offense; S. Gonzales, indecent liberties; and J. C. Messing, statutory offense.  Forty-three inmates were examined by the commission.  A competent medical determination of the mental condition of persons committed to the state prison whose sanity appeared doubtful was asked some weeks ago by Warden Thomas J. Tynan.  The commission appointed consisted of Dr. Edward Delehanty of Denver; Dr. Howell T. Pershing, of Denver, and Dr. C. W. Thompson, of Pueblo.  Governor Shoup recently wrote to all district attorneys in Colorado requesting that great care be exercised in determining whether persons convicted of high crimes were mentally sound.  The persons adjudged insane will be at once removed to the state hospital for the insane, according to the authorities

Talbott, C.S.
Rocky Mountain News 9-25-1891 – Adjudged Insane – Elizabeth, Colo., Sept. 24 – C. S. Talbott was tried to-day for insanity, adjudged insane and will be cared for at Kiowa until better arrangements can be made. Mr. Talbott is a blacksmith by trade, and has been out of employment for the past four months. Mr. Talbott has been noticed to be talking to himself both day and night for the past week, taking but little notice of any one.

Talbott, Percy
Alamosa Journal 10-28-1910 – Talbott Insane – From the Denver Times of the 15th we clip the following:  “Through a letter written to his brother, O. H. Talbott, a well-to-do rancher of Kiowa, Colo., Percy Talbott probably will escape punishment for the killing of W. W. McCoy, a pioneer liveryman of Center, in Saguache county.  Talbot killed McCoy in a dispute over a $4 debt.  A letter received by C. H. Talbott and which was written a day or two before the tragedy, proves beyond a doubt that Percy Talbott was insane, according to his brother, and this letter is almost certain to play a big part in the trial.  Further evidence will be introduced to show that Percy Talbott was twice sent to the insane asylum at Pueblo.  Domestic troubles is given by his brother as a reason for his losing his mind.  He is divorced from his wife and she and her two children are living with a second husband at Kiowa.  Talbott was bound over to the district court at Saguache yesterday and will be taken to Denver for safe keeping.”

Talbott, Percy C.
Elbert County Banner 5-24-1901 – Lost His Reason – The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Talbott will be pained to learn that Mr. Talbott became deranged last Sunday, and was sentenced to the asylum for the insane Wednesday by the County court and was started for that institution at Pueblo the same day in charge of sheriff Putnam.  Mr. Talbott, family and relatives have many sympathizing friends who wish him a speedy recovery.

Talbott, Percy C.
Elbert County Banner 6-10-1904 – Notice of Public Trustee's Sale – Whereas, Percy C. Talbott did by his certain deed of trust dated November 26, 1900, and recorded November 26, 1900, in Book 25 at page 415 of the records in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Elbert County, Colorado, convey to the Public Trustee in said Elbert County the following described real estate situate in said Elbert County, Colorado, to-wit:  The northwest quarter (NW ¼) of the southwest quarter (SW ¼); the east one-half (E ½) of the southwest quarter (SW ¼) and the south one-half (S ½) of the southeast quarter (SE ¼) of Section numbered six (6), and the west one-half (W ½) of the southwest quarter (SW ¼) of Section numbered five (5) in Township numbered eight (8) south of range numbered sixty-four (64) west of the 6th Principal Meridian, containing two hundred eighty (280) acres; which said deed of trust was made to secure the payment of two certain promissory notes bearing even date with said deed of trust for the principal sum of seventeen hundred dollars ($1700) payable to the order of Stanton Courter ten years after the date thereof, with interest thereon at six per cent, per annum from date until paid, interest payable annually, being one note for fifteen hundred dollars ($1500) and one note for two hundred dollars ($200); and Whereas, it is provided in said deed of trust that in case of default in the payment of the interest on said notes according to the tenor and effect thereof or any of them, or in case default shall be made in the payment of the taxes upon said land, then upon notice and demand in writing filed with the said Public Trustee by the legal holder of the indebtedness secured thereby that such holder has declared a violation of the covenants therein contained and has elected to advertise said premises for sale and demands such sale, it shall and may be lawful for said Public Trustee to sell and dispose of the said premises and all the right, title and interest of the said Percy C. Talbott, his heirs and assigns therein, at public auction at the front door of the County Court House in Kiowa in the County of Elbert and State of Colorado, for the highest and best price the same will bring in cash, four weeks public notice having been previously given of the time and place of such sale by advertisement weekly in some newspaper of general circulation at that time published in said Elbert County, a copy of which printed notice as soon as printed shall be mailed to Percy C. Talbott at Elizabeth, Colorado, and to make and give to the purchaser or purchasers of said lands, tenements and premises at such sale a certificate or certificates in writing describing such land, tenement and premises purchased, and the sum or sums paid therefore, and the time when the purchaser or purchasers shall be entitled to a deed or deeds therefore unless the same shall be redeemed as provided by law; and the said Public Trustee shall out of the proceeds or avails of such sale after first paying and retaining all fees, charges and costs of making said sale and advertising said premises, pay to the legal holder of said notes the principal and interest due on said notes according to the tenor and effect thereof, and all moneys advanced by such legal holder of said notes for insurance, taxes and assessments, with interest thereon at ten per cent, per annum, rendering the overplus, if any, unto the said Percy C. Talbott, his legal representatives or assigns; and Whereas, default has been made in the payment of all interest due upon said notes since November 26, 1901, and the taxes upon the said land for the years 1900, 1901 and 1902, amounting to thirty-nine and 26-100 Dollars ($39.26) which was paid by the undersigned, L. C. Holmes, on February 16th, 1904; and Whereas, L. C. Holmes, the legal holder of said notes of seventeen hundred dollars ($1700) has in writing notified me of the above mentioned default and declared a violation of the covenants of said trust deed in that respect, and has further declared said note and indebtedness and the interest thereon from November 26, 1901, due and payable, and has elected to advertise the said property for sale, and did on the 11th day of May 1904, file written notice of such election and demand for sale with the undersigned as said Public Trustee; and Whereas Percy C. Talbott was on August 26, 1903, adjudged insane by the County Court of Elbert County, Colorado, and thereafter and on May 9, 1904, the said notes above described were duly allowed as a claim against his estate and permission was thereupon granted by said Court to forthwith foreclose said trust deed according to its terms;  Now therefore, In compliance with such notice and demand and under and by virtue of the power and authority vested in me by and in accordance with the terms of sale specified in said deed of trust and the law in such case made and provided, I, Frank Long, County Treasurer of Elbert County, Colorado, and Public Trustee in Elbert County, Colorado, do hereby give public notice that I will on Monday, the 13th day of June, 1904, at 1:00 o'clock p.m. at the front door of the County Court House in Kiowa in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, sell all the above described premises and the right, title and interest of the said Percy C. Talbott, his heirs and assigns, therein at public auction for the highest and best price the same will bring in cash for the purpose of paying the sum of seventeen hundred dollars ($1700) and interest thereon from November 26, 1901, and the taxes so paid in addition by the legal holder of said note, and the expenses of executing this trust.  Dated at Kiowa, in Elbert County, Colorado, this 12th day of May, 1904.  Frank Long, Public Trustee in Elbert County.  First insertion May 13, 1904.  Last insertion June 10, 1904.

Tally, Grace
patient race W gender F age 39 marital status M birthplace Iowa source 1920 Woodcroft hospital census

Tancek, Frank
patient gender M race W age 45 marital status S birthplace Austria source 1930 census

Tarlton, James A.
patient race: W sex: M age: 44 marital:S place of birth: Iowa occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tarr, Weldon Y.
patient gender M race W age 59 marital status D birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Tartaglio, John
patient gender M race W age 34 marital status D birthplace Italy source 1930 census

Tasbell, Lucy
patient race: W sex: F age: 69 marital:M place of birth: Missouri occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tate, Anna
Fort Collins  Courier 3-13-1907 – Mrs. Anna Tate, wife of H. L. Tate of Windsor, who has been confined at the county hospital in Greeley on account of illness, was last week adjudged insane and taken to the asylum at Pueblo.

Tate, Anna
patient race W gender F age 31 marital status M place of birth New York source 1910 census

Tate, Annie
patient gender F race W age 52 marital status M birthplace New York source 1930 census

Tate, Annie
patient race: W sex: F age: 41 marital:M place of birth: New York occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tate, James
patient race: W sex: M age: 61 marital:M place of birth: Indiana occupation: ward helper source: 1920 census

Tavis, Della
patient gender F race W age 53 marital status M birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Taylor, Anna R Mrs
admitted 9-18-1899 from Hastings, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Taylor, August
admitted 6-9-1901 from Pueblo, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Taylor, Clara B.
patient gender F race W age 58 marital status M birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Taylor, Ellen
patient gender F race W age 53 marital status Wd birthplace Texas source 1930 census

Taylor, Eugene H.
patient race W gender M month born . year born 1843 age 57 marital status D place of birth New York occupation stock grower source : 1900 census

Taylor, Eugene H.
patient race W gender M age 66 marital status M place of birth New York occupation stud framer source 1910 census

Taylor, George M.
Denver Evening Post 5-8-1896 – Taylor's “Power” – He Exercised It on Knutson, to the Latter's Grief – Pueblo, May 8 – George M. Taylor was to-day discharged as cured from the insane asylum. He arrived here from Sterling February 25. Taylor used to be a cook at the American hotel in that town, when he suddenly became a religious enthusiast. He announced himself to be a poet and prophet with ability to confer the Holy Ghost upon people. Nels Knutson thirsted for this sort of religious fervor and was so overcome with enthusiasm when the transfer had been made by Taylor that he rushed into the streets howling with joy. The unsympathetic authorities ran him in, and when they found out what was the matter with him, railroaded Taylor and himself to the insane asylum. Knutson was discharged some time ago as cured and returned to Sterling. Taylor has gone to work on a ranch near here and claims to be still bubbling over with the old-time power which exercised such an extraordinary influence upon Knutson.

Taylor, Henry
admitted 9-19-1914 from Clear Creek, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Taylor, Herbert A
admitted 9-4-1914 from Montrose, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Taylor, Jasper
admitted 11-13-1900 from Eagle County, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Taylor, Jessie V.
patient gender F race W age 55 marital status S birthplace Iowa source 1930 census

Taylor, Jessie V.
patient race: W sex: F age: 43 marital:S place of birth: Iowa occupation: ward helper source: 1920 census

Taylor, Louise
patient race: W sex: F age: 59 marital:M place of birth: France occupation: ward helper source: 1920 census

Taylor, Louise
admitted 4-19-1915 from Oter, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Taylor, Lula
patient gender F race W age 48 marital status S birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Taylor, Martha
patient race W gender F age 26 marital status S place of birth Iowa source 1910 census

Taylor, Martha
patient gender F race W age 46 marital status S birthplace Iowa source 1930 census

Taylor, Martha
patient race: W sex: F age: 36 marital:S place of birth: Iowa occupation: none source: 1920 census

Taylor, Mary
patient race W gender F month born . year born 1858 age 42 marital status M place of birth Scotland occupation housekeeper source : 1900 census

Taylor, Mary
patient race W gender F age 51 marital status M place of birth England occupation housekeeper source 1910 census

Taylor, Mary
patient gender F race W age 48 marital status M birthplace England source 1930 census

Taylor, Mary
patient race: W sex: F age: 61 marital:M place of birth: Scotland occupation: dish washer source: 1920 census

Taylor, Mary
Rocky Mountain News 12-7-1897 – County May Give Festival $7,000 – … A communication was received from the superintendent of the Colorado home for feeble minded at Pueblo, saying that Mrs. Mary Taylor, the woman who wrote that she was being unlawfully incarcerated in that institution, was undoubtedly insane and had written letters to everyone from McKinley down.

Taylor, Mary G.
patient gender F race W age 72 marital status M birthplace England source 1930 census

Taylor, May Mrs
admitted 1-25-1897 from Ft. Collins, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Taylor, Nellie G.
patient gender F race W age 42 marital status M birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Taylor, Nettie
patient gender F race W age 47 marital status M birthplace Kansas source 1930 census

Taylor, Sarah K.
patient gender F race W age 52 marital status M birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Taylor, William
Leadville Herald Democrat 4-17-1886 – William Taylor was taken to the cooler by Constable Phelps, on the charge that the prisoner was non compos mentis. His neighbors said he was becoming dangerous, but he has behaved very quietly since he has been in jail.

Taylor, William
Leadville Herald Democrat 4-21-1886 – Gone to the Asylum – Having in custody William Taylor and John McCoy, two men who were adjudged insane by a jury in the county court yesterday, Sheriff Lamping departed for the asylum at Pueblo via the Rio Grande passenger last night. William Taylor is a physical wreck and has been leading a precarious life about the city for these many years. Sometimes he took the pick and sledge and worked upon the mines, but dropping into the polluted sanctuaries of State street, contracted a loathsome ill. When his condition had become known, and when reduced almost to a perambulating corpse, the sporting men raised subscription and sent him to Glenwood Springs in hopes that he might find relief there. Perpetual mental strain, however, finally shook his reason and dethroned it. He was able to walk with the aid of a staff, and gradually grew worse until taken to the lock-up. At times he was rational and seemed to realize the awful fate that had overtaken him. These intervals were brief, however, and sinking into his old condition, he became absolutely hopeless.

Taylor, William
Leadville Herald Democrat 4-22-1886 – William Taylor and John McCoy were taken peaceably to the asylum, and landed there yesterday.

Taylor, William Allen
Littleton Independent 2-21-1908 – County Court – Wm. Allen Taylor, of Leetsdale and J. H. Dougherty, of Englewood, were tried by jury in county court last Tuesday on charges of insanity.  Dougherty was discharged and Taylor found guilty and ordered confined in Denver insane ward.

Tedrow, Mary
Fort Collins Weekly Courier 8-15-1913 – Another Lunacy Inquest To Be Called Soon – The county court is arranging for another lunacy inquest in addition to the one for John McLean. This one is for Mrs. Mary Tedrow of Bellvue. The request for an inquest was filled last April, but no further action was taken. Conditions have become such, however, that it has been deemed advisable to hold the inquest very soon. The family physician is arranging to bring the patient to the courthouse. The patient has some sort of hallucination and her one desire is to set fire to anything that will burn. As a result it is necessary to watch her closely and conditions have become such that it is believed she should be placed in the care of the state.

Tefft, William H.
patient gender M race W age 54 marital status D birthplace Rhode Island source 1930 census

Tekaucic, Alois
patient gender M race W age 61 marital status S birthplace Austria source 1930 census

Tekoucich, Mrs.
Aspen Democrat 7-7-1902 Is She Insane? - At the recent investigation to decide the sanity if Mrs. Tekoucich Dr. Smith said she was not insane while Dr. Bryson said she was. Dr. Twining was called in the county court to decide, and he agreed with Dr. Bryson. While this decision of the two doctors compelled Judge Shaw to send the woman to Pueblo, he nevertheless sent her back home on probation. But now comes John Maurin with a complaint that he is fearful for his life so long as Mrs. Tekoucich was allowed her liberty. Mrs. Tekoucich will be taken to the state hospital at Pueblo tomorrow by Sheriff Bruin.

Tekoucich, Mrs.
7-7-1922 Aspen Democrat Times Is She Insane? At the recent investigation to decide the sanity of Mrs. Tekoucich Dr. Smith said she was not insane while Dr. Bryson said she was. Dr. Twining was called in the county court to decide, and he agreed with Dr. Bryson. While this decision of the two doctors compelled Judge Shaw to send the woman to Pueblo, he neverthless sent her back home on probation. But now comes John Maurin with a complaint that he is fearful for his life so long as Mrs. Tekoucich was allowed her liberty. Mrs. Tekoucich will be taken to the state hospital at Pueblo tomorrow by Sheriff Bruin.

Tekovich, Lena
patient gender F race W age 39 marital status Wd birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Teller, Thomas J.
patient gender M race W age 64 marital status M birthplace Nebraska source 1930 census

Temple, R. W.
Fort Collins Weekly Courier 6-28-1905 – Crazy Man Steals Suit Of Clothes – Last Sunday a crazy man, who gives his name as R. W. Temple and his home as Boulder, went into George Gidding's house, five miles east of this city, and helping himself to a suit of cloths, made off with his booty. The sheriff's office was immediately notified and temple was arrested shortly afterwards while on his way to this city. The arrest was made by Under-sheriff McGregor, and the nutty individual place in jail. Sheriff McCreery went to Boulder on Monday to inquire about Temple, learning that he had been about that place for the past four or five years and was regarded as harmlessly insane. An effort is being made to get Boulder county authorities to take charge of Temple, as he is clearly of unsound mind. The clothes were recovered.

Temple, W. R.
Rocky Mountain News 10-15-1890 – Haunted His Mind – Pitiful Tale of W. R. Temple, Who Sacrificed His Life to Defend His Honor – Boulder, Colo., Oct. 14 – To-day in the county court room before Judge Rogers is being tried W. R. Temple for insanity. The history of the man is most remarkable as told by his friend to The News correspondent to-day. Mr. Temple was the engineer on the Union Pacific railroad who made the fast run across the continent and chief of a division of Brotherhood of engineers at Larimer City, Wyo. During his career as engineer his father and mother died, leaving him with a young sister to care for, whom he sent to college. While receiving her education she was seduced by a man who had promised marriage. When the news reached Temple at Laramie City he immediately left the train and went East in search of his sister's seducer and followed him from New York to Oakland, Cala. Killed Him – He there found the man who had ruined her, and the pride of his life, and after talking a few minutes with him, drew his revolver and killed him. For this crime he was tried, found guilty and sentenced to the penitentiary for life. He served fifteen years, and for good behavior was honorably discharged. Judge Terry, who was lately shot in California, defended Mr. Temple, while the cost was paid by the Brotherhood. Whenever he drinks this trouble haunts him, and makes him almost wild. He attended the fireman's tournament here and drank heavily, was arrested and placed in jail, and is now being tried for insanity.

Temple, W. R.
Rocky Mountain News 10-17-1890 – How He Acted – E. R. Temple Threatens to Kill Boulder's Marshal – Boulder, Colo., Oct. 16 – E. R. Temple, who was tried for insanity on Tuesday last before Judge George Rogers and acquitted before the jury left the room, was arrested again yesterday for stealing a Winchester rifle and two pairs of pants from J. M. Warren, proprietor of the Boulder house, and an overcoat from the residence of William Callahan. He told Shep Maderia, the marshal, while being taken to jail, that Shep was following too close on his trail, and if he did not stop it he would kill him. This morning, when Deputy Sheriff Coates entered the jail, the prisoners said they had not slept a wink for the night, that Temple had threatened to kill every one of them, and had a large knife with him to carry out his threats. The prisoner was found by Deputy Coates perfectly nude. At 10 o'clock a.m. he was taken before Justice Dan Robinson and fined for stealing (the) overcoat $10 and costs, and for the second offence of taking (the) Winchester rifle and pants was remanded to jail in default of obtaining $1,000 bond for his appearance before the grand jury in February next. Prosecuting Attorney Campbell said to the court: “I think, in the interest of this poor, demented fellow, and of humanity, that the prisoner should be sent down in care of Dr. Toombs, where he would receive proper treatment and kind attention.”

Temple, W.R.
Boulder News 10-23-1890 – W. R. Temple was adjudged insane and will be sent to asylum. Source “Boulder County, Colorado, Deaths and the Insane, 1859 – 1900,” by Mary McRoberts.

Temple, W.R.
Rocky Mountain News 10-21-1890 – Adjudged Insane – Boulder, Colo., Oct. 20 – W. R. Temple was a second time tried for insanity before Judge George Rogers this afternoon. A warrant was sworn out by Joseph A. Monroe. Since being confined in jail he has torn up his clothes and remained in the cell nude, and would not consent to put on any clothing until informed by the sheriff that he was to be tried for insanity. Judge Rogers made a very short address to the jurors, when they retired, and in five minutes returned a verdict of insanity. He will be taken to Pueblo to-morrow evening by Sheriff Antery, where he will be taken care of by R. P. Tombs.

Ten Winkle, Fred
patient gender M race W age 60 marital status Wd birthplace Michigan source 1930 census

Tenior, Cliff
Durango Democrat 9-16-1905 – Attempted Suicide – Yesterday morning as the north bound train reached Elk Park the engineer noticed a signal from Mr. Roberts and stopped the train.  Mr. Roberts boarded with a man by name of Cliff Tenior, who was insane and had tried to take his own life by cutting his throat in two places and each wrist in an effort to sever the arteries.  He was brought as far as Rockwood, then taken from the train and placed in a corral where guards kept watch over him until Dr. Lefurgey was telephoned for and drove up, returning in the evening with the patient, who was taken to Mercy hospital.  A dull implement only spared his life as the cuts in his throat are 5 inches long and 1 ½ inches deep.

Tennis, William
Aspen Democrat 10-25-1907 William Tennis Is Adjudged Insane - At a session of the county court last night the following jury was appointed to inquire in to the mental condition of William Tennis: John Strong, John Cunningham, Frank Henry, Harry Brown, "Dudley" Tillman, and Charles Dustan. Attorney H.W. Clark represented the people and Lyman Hays looked after the interests of Mr. Tennis. A number of witnesses were examined and Mr. Tennis was also put on the stand. The attorneys addressed the court and jury, after which County Judge H.C. Rogers charged the jury as to the law and their duty in the premises. After being out a short time the jury returned a verdict that Mr. Tennis was sufficiently unbalanced as to warrant his being sent to a sanitarium for treatment. The jury recommended that inasmuch as a fund had been raised for his benefit Mr. Tennis be not placed in the state institution for the insane but hat he be sent to some private sanitarium. Judge Rogers instructed the sheriff to convey Mr. Tennis to Dr. Hubert Work's sanitarium at Pueblo at his earliest convenience, where he would receive treatment without cost to the county, his maintenance being paid for out of the fund raised for that purpose.

Terr, Harry B.
patient race: W sex: M age: 54 marital:M place of birth: Illinois occupation: none source: 1920 census

Terrlup, John
admitted 3-16-1914 from Pueblo, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Terron, John
Rocky Mountain News 9-9-1897 – Adjudged Insane – Telluride, Colo., Sept. 8 – John Terron, a comparative stranger, was tried in the county court this afternoon and adjudged insane. The judge ordered that he be taken to the state asylum at Pueblo.

Terry, George W.
patient gender M race W age 63 marital status M birthplace Minnesota source 1930 census

Terry, George W.
Littleton Independent 12-8-1922 – George W. Terry of Santa Fe Avenue was placed in jail last Saturday and is being held on a charge of insanity. A lunacy commission will sit Saturday to try him on that charge.

Terry, Sarah Althea
White Pine Cone 3-18-1892 – Sarah Althea Terry has been sent to an insane asylum.

Tessadric, Joe
Yampa Leader 8-15-1913 – Sheriff Chivington took Joe Tessadric to the asylum last week, Tessadric having been found insane by the county court at Steamboat Springs.

Tessardi, Joe
Routt County Republican 8-22-1913 – Here and There – Interesting Items Gathered From Various Sources So That The Readers of the Republican May Know – Joe Tessardi of the Juniper mine was taken to the state insane asylum by Sheriff Chivington last week.

Thackarey, John
patient gender M race W age 99 marital status M birthplace New York source 1930 census

Thackarey, John
patient race: W sex: M age: 89 marital:. place of birth: United States occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thayer, Stephen N
admitted 11-23-1898 from Leadville, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Thayer, Steven N.
11-24-1898 Chaffee County Republican - Steven N. Thayer, who at one time conducted a photograph gallery in this city, was adjudged insane at Leadville this week and was taken to Pueblo yesterday. The Herald Democrat says: It was done on complaint of his wife to whom Thayer had shown violence, and his mental condition clearly was not sound. Thayer is one of the pioneers of this region and has quite a reputation as a hunter and frontiersman. His condition is due to continued ill health.

Thelow, John
Aspen Weekly Times September 11, 1897 John Thelow Insane - “Rocky Mountain Jack” Gives the Officers a Lively Tussle - John Thelow, who has been working Fred Stockman's ranch on Sopris creek this summer, was adjudged insane in the county court yesterday, and will be taken to the asylum in Pueblo. Thelow is about 35 years of age, and has no family. He has been living alone at the ranch, and for two or three weeks past has been acting in a strange manner. Some of his neighbors had reported that the man was apparently becoming insane. On Thursday he came to town and acted so queerly that the sheriff took him and locked him up in the county jail. Yesterday morning Robert Jones, janitor, had occasion to go into the cell where Thelow was confined. Without warning the insane man made a vicious assault upon Jones. He is a big muscular fellow, and the janitor was unable to get him into his cell. Mr. Jones then went to call Undersheriff Hull who lives near. When he returned with Hull, Mr. Thelow had fled from the jail and was nowhere to be found. A search was made uptown, Marshal Williamson joining the sheriffs officers. Thelow was soon met coming down the street, but as soon as he spied the officers he started to run. He was caught, but he gave the officers a very lively tussle before he could be subdued. The frenzied man was put into Sam Pressoon's bus and taken back to jail. Yesterday afternoon Thelow was brought into the county court and the question of his sanity tried befoe the following jury: J.D. Bransford, J.T. Stewart, Nate Hyams, Vincent Johnson, A.F. Munn and E.G. Galloway. Several witnesses testified and Thelow himself put on the stand. The latter talked quite rationally about things that had happened early in life, his childhood, his parents, etc. But regarding recent happenings he had a very indistinct and confused recollection. John Wiley was appointed guardian ad litem, and appeared for Thelow in the examination. H.W. Clark appeared for the people. At the conclusion of the evidence the jury retired and in a few minutes returned with a verdict declaring the man insane. The doctors think that Thelow's malady is temporary, and that he will be returned from Pueblo cured in a few weeks. He is temperate, hard working and well like by all his neighbors. Friends have agreed to look after his live stock and other interests pending his treatment at the Pueblo asylum.

Thelow, John
Aspen Tribune 9-5-1897 – Another Insane Patient – John Thelow of Capitol Creek Give the Officers Some Trouble – John Thelow, lessee of the Stockman ranch on Capitol creek was brought in town Friday night by some of his neighbors and a charge of insanity entered against him before Judge Rogers of the county court.  Yesterday he was adjudged insane by a jury and he will be taken to Pueblo as soon as the proper arrangements can be made.  Thelow was placed in the county jail Friday night and yesterday morning when Jailer Jones went in to see how his prisoner was getting along, the insane man swiped him a blow under the optic and escaped into the open air.  Jones lost no time in notifying Deputy Hull and the escaped prisoner was soon found on Cooper avenue, where with the aid of Chief of Police Williamson and a few by-standers he was overpowered and conveyed back to jail after a lively scuffle.

Thelow, John
Aspen Tribune 9–8-1897 – John Thelow, the Capitol creek rancher who a few days ago was adjudged insane in the county court, has been committed to the insane asylum at Pueblo.

Thelow, John
Rocky Mountain News 9-5-1897 – John Thelow Now a Maniac – Prominent Ranchman Near Aspen Is Adjudged Insane – Aspen, Colo., Sept. 4 – John Thelow, a prominent ranchman residing on Capital creek, some fourteen miles below town, was brought to this city last night by some of his neighbors, a raving maniac. He was to-day adjudged insane in the county court and will be taken to Pueblo at once. This morning when the jailer took Thelow's breakfast in to him he was knocked down by the maniac, who escaped. Later he was overpowered on Cooper avenue by the officers and taken back to jail. It required all the strength of four men to subdue the man. He is about 35 years of age and up to about six weeks ago was considered perfectly sound in mind and body.

Theodoran, Thomas
patient gender M race W age 37 marital status S birthplace Greece source 1930 census

Thie, Anton
Rocky Mountain News 9-5-1884 – County Court – Probate – The People, etc., vs. Anton Khaie. On motion of W. B. Mills, county attorney, and it appearing that defendant's name is Anton Thie instead of Anton Khaie, it is ordered that record be amended by inserting the name of Anton Thie for Anton Khaie wherever it appears, and that the trial, etc., proceed in the name of Anton Thie. Trial by jury; verdict, insane, and it appearing that the defendant has no property, costs to be paid by the county of Arapahoe; $15 allowed guardian ad litem. Order of commitment to insane asylum.

Thiebaud, Bertha
patient gender F race W age 35 marital status M birthplace Illinois source 1930 census

Thode, Henry
patient race W gender M age 58 marital status M place of birth Germany occupation farmer source 1910 census

Thomas, Ann
Hugo Range Ledger 12-29-1904 – Mrs. Ann Thomas of Erie, who was found living in apparent destitution and tried before the County Court at Greeley on the charge of insanity, was declared sane by the jury and returned home.  She was found to have $3,000 deposited in Boulder and Longmont banks.

Thomas, Anna
patient gender F race W age 56 marital status S birthplace Ohio source 1930 census

Thomas, Anna
patient race: W sex: F age: 43 marital:S place of birth: Ohio occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thomas, Anna
born 1874 Ohio, died 11-30-1947 at asylum buried Roselawn Cemetery, Pueblo, Colo. researcher contributed

Thomas, Ella J.
patient race: W sex: F age: 22 marital:M place of birth: Colorado occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thomas, Ella M.
patient gender F race W age 56 marital status D birthplace Illinois source 1930 census

Thomas, G.
patient, white, male, age 60, single, Pennsylvania, 1885 census

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 9-7-1885 – Buckskin Jimmy Arrested – James Taylor, the Well-Known Glove Maker, in Charge for Lunacy – James Taylor, alias “Buckskin Jimmy,” was arrested by Sergeant Inman and turned over to Sheriff Graham and by him placed in the county jail. Mr. Taylor is supposed to be insane and will remain in jail until an inquiry has been made into his case by the County court. “Buckskin Jimmy,” the name by which he is familiarly known, is an old-time Coloradoan and in early days was a hunter and trapper. When this country succumbed to civilization “Jimmy” opened a fur and skin store in Denver and has followed the business of making gloves and other articles from buckskin for a number of years, and has managed to acquire quite a competence. Several months ago Jimmy began to show signs of a failing mind. He was in the habit of giving his property away to any one who asked him for it, and was once arrested for seizing a wagon for debt in a way not justified by law. He ran it away into the country, took it to pieces and hid it, and it was only by a careful search that it was found. When the facts came out on his trial he was released. Since that time Taylor has been acting strange and queerly, and although held in restrain by his friends he succeeded in eluding their vigilance at times and would dispose of any and all of his property he could lay hands on. It was this that caused his arrest. It is probable that a short stay at the asylum will cure him of his malady.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-9-1885 – James Thomas, better known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” was having a new trial in the County court yesterday to determine whether he is insane or not.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-10-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – The People vs. James Thomas; lunacy; trial concluded; verdict insane, etc.; ordered that defendant be discharged from arrest and that guardian ad litem be allowed $35 for his services.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-10-1885 – “Buckskin Jimmy” – A Jury in the County Court Decides that James Thomas is Not Insane – A Peculiar Case – The trial of James Thomas, better known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” was concluded in the County court yesterday and the jury decided that Jimmy was not insane. Perhaps a more truthful verdict, if it could have been made less formal, would have been that Thomas was not insane enough to send to the asylum. The case, as indicated by the testimony, is a very peculiar one, and it is alleged by some who were witnesses in the case, and who are otherwise interested in it, that it can be sifted down to a quarrel over Thomas' property by some of his friends or relatives. Thomas' property still remains in the hands of a conservator, but it is claimed by some that Thomas bulldozes this conservator a good deal and causes him no end of trouble and annoyance. Thomas has been known for years as a very eccentric character, but it was not, it is said, till a few months ago that his peculiarities became marked enough to raise a serious question as to his sanity. Thomas was first tried for insanity a short time since and the jury disagreed. He therefore was granted a new trial with the result as above stated. There is no claim that Thomas is a violent or dangerous lunatic, but it is claimed that he is unfitted to take care of property, and that so long as he is at large he will occasion his friends no end of trouble. One of the witnesses in the case said that Thomas could have anything from his place any time he wanted it, but there was the evidence to show that he had stolen a horse belonging to this same witness, and it was also shown that Jimmy's ideas of property were very much confused, and that he handled his own belongings and other people's with about equal recklessness. Jimmy has been known for many years as a hunter and trapper and dealer in furs, skins and hides, and his gloves have had a wide celebrity. He has always been regarded as an oddity, being noted for many eccentricities. His affairs remain in the hands of a conservator, but it is claimed that Jimmy pays very little attention to any orders from that gentleman. Just what will be the final outcome of Jimmy's vagaries remains to be seen.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News – 8-3-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – People vs. James Thomas; lunacy; information in writing having been filed by S. E. Browne that defendant has been restored to reason, on motion of S. E. Browne, Esq., ordered that trial on said information be filed for Tuesday, August 24, at 9 a.m., and let venire issue for jury returnable at that time, and let citation issue to Samuel Schell, conservator, notifying him of information and requiring him to show cause on August 24, if any he has, against said information.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 8-25-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – People vs. James Thomas; lunacy; it appearing by the return of the sheriff that he had been unable to find Samuel Schell, conservator, etc., on motion of S. E. Browne, Esq., hearing continued until Friday, September 3.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 9-7-1886 – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas; lunacy; claims Barberi & Daprato for $900, Joseph J. Bukford $14.50, Orris Knapp, $48.52 allowed.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 9-23-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – People vs. James Thomas; lunacy; petition to have said Thomas declared restored to reason; on trial.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 9-24-1886 – Declared Insane Again – James Thomas, “Buckskin Jimmy,” was again declared insane by the County court on Wednesday evening. Jimmy's attorney, General Sam E. Browne, claimed that his client might be insane or “queer” in some things, but that did not prove that he was altogether insane and unable to attend to the glove business. Thomas and some of his friends claim that Thomas is able to manage his business, but juries seem to think that a conservator is needed to take care of his property.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-26-1887 – The Same Old Case – “Buckskin Jimmy” and His Alleged Lunacy Again Before the County Court for Consideration – The omnipresent James Thomas lunacy case was before the County court yesterday. For the past six months or so there has scarcely been a day so cold and inclement as not to see some order made in this case. Yesterday the case was tried before a jury on an application declaring that Thomas had been restored to reason. The story of the case ought to be pretty familiar to the public by this time. James Thomas, better known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” is an old-timer. In the earlier days of Colorado he was noted as a trapper and hunter and a dealer in furs and skins. As a dealer in gloves, leather and skins he has accumulated considerable money. For a year or more past Thomas has acted strangely in some ways and particularly in regard to financial matters, and it being alleged that he was insane, Mr. Samuel Shell was appointed conservator for the estate. Some of Thomas' friends have claimed that Mr. Shell was not dealing justly and rightly and have sought his removal. They now seek to have the conservator removed and Thomas declared restored to reason. Thomas' property is valued all the way from $6,000 or $7,000 to $10,000. The case was on trial in the County court nearly all day yesterday, but was continued to Wednesday.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-28-1887 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas; inquiry into restoration to reason of James Thomas, on an alleged lunatic. The jury has found that Thomas has been restored to reason sufficiently to manage his own property.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 8-16-1891 – The Courts – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: Lunacy – James Thomas; order striking hearing from trial list for want of prosecution.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 2-12-1892 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: Lunacy of James Thomas; petitioner moves to set for trial; court declines to set case on account of absence of conservator.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 2-26-1892 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: Lunacy of James Thomas; trial set by agreement for March 25.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 3-26-1892 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: Lunacy, James Thomas; trial continued by agreement.

Thomas, James
patient race W gender M month born December year born 1829 age 70 marital status S place of birth England occupation tayler source : 1900 census

Thomas, James
patient race W gender M age 80 marital status S place of birth England occupation tailor source 1910 census

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-15-1893 – “Buckskin Jimmy's” Hitherto Harmless Dementia Takes on an Offensive Phase – He Pesters Judge Le Fevre with an Unceasing Chain of Attorneys Calling to Enter Appearance – Buckskin Jimmy, as James Thomas is called, has been making Judge Le Fevre's life miserable. He has been employing attorneys right and left, and they have been going to the county court at the rate of one a day for weeks, and entering their appearance. Judge Le Fevre has cited all of them to appear on the 17th, and he will then try to determine what is to be done. Orie Bower appeared yesterday, and withdrew his appearance shortly afterward. Buskskin Jimmy has about $10,000 worth of property and some money, all in the hands of a reliable guardian. He can get money from the guardian when he wants it, but frequently he will refuse more than $1 and never take more than $5. He will sometimes disappear for days and even weeks. Jimmy is a loquacious and rather entertaining man on general topics, and talks so rationally about his affairs that he will fool nine persons out of ten who do not know him. He claims he owns an equity in a large trackage area between Fifteenth and Sixteenth streets, and below Wynkoop. The fact is he did own interests there which would have made him worth $250,000 by this time had he not dickered it away. He is entirely harmless, and is therefore not restrained of his liberty; but this new break of hiring all the lawyers in town to take up imaginary cases is getting wearisome to the court.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-25-1893 – Had Eight Lawyers – Attorney Mulligan Will Try to Straighten Out “Buckskin Jimmy's” Estate – Judge Le Fevre succeeded in rounding up the attorneys whom James Thomas, the loquacious and apparently reasonable insane man who is known best as Buckskin Jimmy, has hired during the last three months. They were John G. Taylor, Jacob Fillius, M. A. Haynes, Browne, Putnam & Preston, T. C. Early and Willard Mulligan. Jimmy has gone to a good many more, but they happened to know him and for that reason never made their appearance a matter of record at the county court. The legal gentlemen referred to were in no wise less astute because of the fact that they had accepted his case and entered an appearance, because he would fool anybody into believing that he was as well balanced mentally as the average man. All the attorneys withdrew their appearance except Mr. Mulligan, and he will make an effort to get Thomas' affairs in shape so his residue of property may care for him as long as possible. There is between $7,000 and $8,000 of it. Thomas has been adjudged a lunatic twice. He was once taken before Judge Miller, a year or more after his first conviction, and convinced the judge and all the persons connected with the probate court of his entire sanity and capability of managing his own affairs. Subsequently he became so erratic that he was declared a lunatic and has since then been under that restriction.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-25-1893 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Le Fevre – Estate James Thomas, lunatic; following attorneys appear in response to citation, and withdraw their appearance as attorneys for lunatic: John G. Taylor, Jacob Filliuns, M. A. Haynes, Browne, Putnam & Preston and T. C. Early.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-26-1893 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Le Fevre – Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; set for hearing on petition as to restoration to reason May 18.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 8-2-1893 – Court Calendar – County Court – The following business was transacted yesterday in the county court: Judge Le Fevre – Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; conservator ordered to make and file report of his acts and doings within ten days.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 10-4-1893 – Could Not Control His Ward – Willard Milligan appeared before the county court yesterday to report on the mental condition of James Thomas. The latter was adjudged insane some years ago. Lately he has been improving and Mr. Milligan was appointed to examine into his mental condition and decide if he were fit to be trusted with the management of his property. The report was in the negative. Mr. Milligan was discharged and no successor appointed.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 10-4-1893 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Le Fevre – James Thomas, lunatic; Willard Mulligan withdraws his appearance for lunatic.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 10-10-1893 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Le Fevre – James Thomas, lunatic; H. S. Vaughn has leave to withdraw files 24 hours.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 10-18-1893 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Le Fevre – James Thomas, lunatic; set for hearing on petition of Pomeroy as to lunatic's restoration to reason, November 25.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 11-22-1893 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Le Fevre: James Thomas, lunacy; reset for hearing as to restoration to reason, December 26, on application of conservator.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-27-1893 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Le Fevre: James Thomas, lunatic; by consent reset for hearing as to restoration to reason January 23.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-23-1894 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Le Fevre: Set for (trial) to-day: James Thomas; lunacy.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-26-1895 – Claims He is Sane – “Buckskin Jimmy” Wants a Declaration of That Fact from the County Court – “Buckskin Jimmy,” whose real name is James Thomas, is being tried in the county court once more on the question as to his sanity. He has been adjudged insane and sane so many times, that there is considerable doubt in the minds of the public at large as to where “Buckskin Jimmy” really stands as to his state of mind according to the law. “Jimmy” is one of the best known characters around the city and in addition is one of the old pioneers, at one time being proprietor of a general store on Blake street and is reputed to be worth from $30,000 to $50,000. He spends most of his time riding around on an old horse collecting tin cans, cigar stumps and pieces of bailing wire. A few years ago some of his friends in Denver had him adjudged insane and a conservator was appointed for his estate. Jimmy did not like this and is now attempting once more to be adjudged sane, so that he may look after his own property. The suit this time is brought by Thomas Pomery, his nearest friend, and is not yet concluded.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-27-1895 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Steele: 1064 – 1064 – Estate of James Thomas; court orders that George W. Cole, conservator, file new bond within three days.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 5-3-1895 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Steele: 1064 – Estate James Thomas; new bond of conservator in sum of $14,000 approved.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 5-3-1895 – Civil Court Briefs – George W. Cole, conservator of the estate of James Thomas, a lunatic, yesterday filed a bond in the sum of $14,000.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 6-25-1895 – Estate of James Thomas – Judge Steele made an order to-day citing George W. Cole to appear in court and make a full report of the management of the property of James Thomas, a lunatic, for whom he was appointed trustee.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-21-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; hearing on petition of conservator to sell certain personal property for less than appraised value; petition granted. Hearing on petition to sell five shares of stock of Loan association; petition granted; conservator to cause notice to be published four days.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 10-8-1895 – Buckskin Jimmy's Estate – The estate of James Thomas, better known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” has dwindled down to $1,560.50. Yesterday Attorney Vaughn asked Judge Steele to cite the conservator of the estate, George W. Cole, to explain why he had not accounted for interest money. Thomas is slightly insane.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 8-11-1896 – More Details Wanted – Conservator Cole's Report is Not Satisfactory – A hearing in the objection of Attorney H. S. Vaughn to the report of George W. Cole, conservator of the estate of James Thomas, a lunatic, is being had in the County court this afternoon. Cole's report was filed on July 17 last. Mr. Vaughn alleges that the conservator makes no allowance of interest on money coming into his hands while handling the estate, that the charges for all expenses outside of the payment of Thomas' weekly stipend are not valid and proper. Thomas has been the source of a great deal of trouble and anxiety among both his friends and the authorities since 1886, when he became demented. Before residing in Denver he was an inmate of the insane asylum at Hamilton, Ont. Cole was his guardian after leaving Canada until the time he was sent to Pueblo, and his estate was placed in the hands of the court. The total amount of money expended by Cole during his term as conservator is shown by the report to be $3,518.39, of which $2,295 is charged for “taking care” of Thomas. This and a number of the items in Cole's bill are objected to by Attorney Vaughn, who represents Thomas' relatives. Among these items are, “expenses for the treatment of Thomas for injuries sustained in being kicked by a horse, $25;” “assisting in the search for Thomas after he escaped, $5;” “hunting for Thomas and a buggy which he had stolen while in a fit of insanity, $5;” “looking after Thomas to keep him from placing ties on railroad tracks, $5;” “time spent in searching for a buggy stolen by Thomas in North Denver, $3.” The conservator's bill shows that Thomas escaped from his charge a score or more of times and that days and weeks were sometimes consumed in apprehending him. The insane man's friends, however, think that Cole is not sufficiently specific and that his report is very indefinite. They will accordingly protest against the report being approved and will demand of the conservator a more satisfactory accounting.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 8-12-1896 – Court Briefs – The hearing of the objections to Conservator Cole's report in “Buckskin” Jimmy Thomas' estate has been continued by the county court to September 8.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 3-2-1897 – Buckskin Jimmy's Estate – Weighty Bills of the Administrator Thrown Out – The jury in the case of General W. Cole against the estate of James Thomas, returned a special verdict for the defendant yesterday in division four. The verdict states that the jury bases its decision upon the reports and final reports given into its hands, together with the evidence. They found that the sum of $27,540.05 belonging to the estate of James Thomas, lunatic, was in the hands of Cole. There was a discrepancy of $170.50 between report No. 5 and the final report. The items rejected in the final report were G. W. Miller's bill, $250; G. W. Cole's compensation for seven years, seven months, twenty-four days, $2,295; same, attendance on the probate court, $180; same, commission on $4,706.50, $2,820.39. Notice of motion for new trial was given and judgment reserved.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 2-26-1897 – “Buckskin Jimmy's” Case – Concluded in Court To-Day – Lawyers in Hot Debate – The appeal suit before Judge Allen of George Cole against James Thomas, otherwise known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” was given to the jury this morning, and a verdict was expected this afternoon. Cole is the conservator of the estate of Thomas, and sues the estate for $2,000 in claims; these have been disallowed by the county court, and hence the appeal. Before the close of the case the attorneys in it had a hot debate. Col. H. S. Vaughn, appearing for “Buckskin Jimmy,” claimed that the state had been grossly mismanaged, and among questions he put to Col. Cole was: “Why don't you give him a bath now and then?” This brought blood to the eyes of ex-Judge Miller, defending Conservator Cole, who pronounced: “The statements of opposing counsel are false and as bad as the sulphurous fumes of the eternal regions. When I was county judge less decisions were appealed from (me) than any other county judge. I had no clique hanging about me; had no favorites to play.” It was understood that the ex-judge had the present county judge in mind in his remarks. Thomas has been adjudged insane in that court, and his estate is supervised by it. After these displays of anger the jury got the case.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 4-8-1897 – Shame To Treat Him So – Poor Buckskin Jimmy's Absolute Destitution – Poor Charles Thomas, otherwise known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” is living in a deplorable state and Judge Allen took cognizance of it this morning when he overruled a motion for a new trial in the suit which George W. Cole, removed conservator of the Thomas estate, brought against it, which on trial has been decided against him and which on motion for a new trial being denied is to be taken to the court of appeals, the money due Thomas being in the meantime tied up in the courts, and he being utterly deprived of sustenance. So much so that, as it came out this morning, Buckskin Jimmy is subsisting on the refuse found in ash barrels and the like, and his only home is the city streets, where he wanders aimlessly all day and at night sleeps wherever a board can give him shelter. All this has happened to a man who has made a fortune of $40,000 in the manufacture of buckskin gloves – that is how Thomas came by his name – who has lost it nearly all in litigation imposed upon him and who is now partly demented and an object of pity to all who recognize him as he walks ragged, hungry and homeless in the city streets, a diminutive man, very aged for his 60 years of life. In denying the motion for a new trial, Judge Allen spoke this morning thus impressively: “This is a case of peculiar character and Thomas is utterly dependent for support on the interest the public takes in him. We ought all to be very cautious and careful in matters affecting his interests and the court ought to be more cautious, more careful, and more considerate than in ordinary cases because the means which should support him are tied up in this court. Something must be done for this man. He is absolutely destitute and is in want of the necessaries of life; he has no place to sleep and no one gives him attention. We can all be humane and we can all use the remedies the law can enforce to a person absolutely dependent on the law. This court has no immediate control of James Thomas and we wish to suggest to counsel that you go straightaway to the county commissioners or to the county court with the record appearing in this case in this court and that some effort be made their in behalf of this man. In my opinion, Thomas should have been cared for in a different way than he has been for a long time past. If he has any estate it is out of his reach. It is inhuman and has been for a long time to allow him to suffer thus, and if I had the power I would take care of him. He should be sent to the hospital or somewhere else, where he would be kept clean or fed in a humane way. He is wandering on the streets, he has nothing to eat – let the counsel go immediately to the county court that something be done for him.” These remarks were addressed to Attorneys George W. Miller, appearing for Cole, and H. S. Vaughn, who has volunteered his services for Thomas and his estate. The suit in question was one of appeal from the county court by George W. Cole against the estate. When George W. Miller, who is now Cole's counsel, was county judge, he appointed Cole conservator of Thomas' estate, he being adjudged insane, and on July 17, 1896, he made a report claiming that nothing was due to the estate and that on the contrary it owed him $1,900. At this point Mr. Vaughn volunteered his services to Thomas and he objected to the report being received. “He objected to the report, charging improper use of the money of the estate and lack of care of Thomas. Judge Steele found that Cole had used the funds belonging to the estate for his own benefit and had charged compound interest. The upshot was that Cole was summarily removed as conservator and not allowed any compensation for his services; was told that he must pay interest on the money he used and also return to the estate $3,829 which was afterwards made $2,978.89. His claim of $1,900 was disallowed. An appeal was taken to the district court and tried last February. The jury found entirely against Cole and said he owed the estate some $2,754.05. Nothing was done for Jimmy this morning. The attorneys appeared in no hurry to go up before the county court. Thomas himself was present in court and rushed out as soon as he heard what Judge Allen said. His counsel rushed after him but he had disappeared quickly. He fears that an attempt will be made to send him to the county poor farm and his pride and obstinacy will not allow him. For the past several nights S. H. Hastings has permitted him to find shelter in a downtown house. No conservator has been appointed by the county court as successor to ex-Conservator Cole.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-9-1897 – Buckskin Jimmy's Estate – Judge Allen's Animadverts Severely on a Conservator – Judge Allen of division 4 yesterday overruled a motion for a new trial made by George W. Cole, conservator of the estate of James Thomas, otherwise known as “Buckskin Jimmy.” Cole was appointed conservator by the county court in 1888, Thomas being declared insane. In July, 1896, he made a report in which he claimed $1,000 coming to him from the estate, but attorneys for Thomas objected to the return, and a jury was made to believe that, on the contrary, the conservator owed the estate about $2,700. He was removed at the time, and appealed to the district court, where in February it was decided that he owed his charge $2,754.05. He asked for a new trial yesterday, but Judge Allen overruled the motion, at the same time elaborating the fact of Thomas being homeless, and depending on stray bits of food for sustenance. The court said that the man should be given shelter, in view of his money being tied up in the courts, and advised that the attorney for Thomas, H. S. Vaughan, ask the county to provide for him. Cole will appeal to the supreme court. He said last evening that he had neglected his own business to attend to Jimmy, and that the man's estate originally footed up only about $4,700. Mr. Cole brought him here from Canada, and looked after his wants continuously. However, Jimmy sought altogether eleven lawyers, asking them to appear in court to declare him sane. Attorneys, according to reports, bled the unfortunate fellow for his money, which had been given him from time to time by the conservator under the order of the court. Over $4,000, Mr. Cole says, has been spent by him to care for his ward. He claims the $1,000 for his services, alleging that he has yet to get a cent for his trouble.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 4-10-1897 – Buckskin Jimmy – Statement Made by George W. Cole, Conservator of James Thomas – In view of the fact that there has been so much newspaper comment of a sensational character connected with Buckskin Jimmy, coupled with a perversion of the truth, a simple statement of the facts may not be out of place. At the request of the close friends and relatives of the said Thomas, I was appointed his conservator in 1888. I found him in a lunatic asylum at Toronto, Canada, chained to the floor. I did a great deal of work, advanced $350 of my own money to bring him to Denver, not knowing whether he had any estate or not. After getting him here I provided him with a good home, clothing and food, besides furnishing a proper attendant for him. He made his escape from the attendant and after two weeks' search I found him. After finding him I consulted with his friends and relatives as to what was best to do with him. They thought it proper to let him go where he pleased and give him so much a week in money upon which to live, as he was harmless. I reported these facts to the court and the court then made an order allowing him $5 a week and more if I thought necessary. The court further ordered me to look after him and keep him out of trouble. I did so. The first year I was continually looking after him and searching for his property. Since that time, through all these years, I have continued to look after him to the neglect and injury of my own business. I paid him continuously the $5 a week allowed by the court, beside the payment of other moneys ordered by the court, at one time as much as $175 in one sum, it being contended at that time it would be better to let him have this amount to see if he could start a little business to employ his time and mind. The moneys I paid him were gotten away from him to a large extent by attorneys. He had as many as eleven employed at one time, their contention being that he was sane. I attended court in these matters fifty-two times upon notice from attorneys claiming to appear for him on petitions for restoration to sanity. Finally, while Judge Le Fevre was county judge, he told them that so many attorneys could not be paid out of the estate, but that Mr. H. S. Vaughn might go on and try the case. The trial did not come on until the present incumbent, Judge Steele, was on the bench. After a full trial before Judge Steele and jury Thomas was still found to be insane. Vaughn had been paid, as he admitted, by Thomas, $60, and by order of the court I paid him $25 additional. He afterward requested me to pay $150 more, which I refused, having no order of the court to pay. After the above trial the court ordered me to file a report. (I had filed every year during my conservatorship reports of the money received and expended by me.) Pursuant to this order I filed the required report. The entire estate that I found belonging to Thomas amounted to $4,700. I paid out and expended by the order of the court as above stated in Thomas' behalf about $4,000, for which vouchers have been presented and filed in court. I had been instructed by the judge of the court not to invest Thomas' money as his sanity might be established at any time, in which case I would have to turn it over to him at once. I obeyed the instructions – never used the money or invested it in any manner. I have never received any compensation for eight years' services and constant attention, nor any allowance for collecting the money or paying it out. Thomas lives now, as he has for the last thirty years, since I have known him. To confine him makes him a raging maniac. The most of the expense which has been incurred in trying to take care of him has been caused by the interference of outsiders, either through ignorance or design. When Thomas is let alone he is generally reasonably quiet. He has daily attended the present session of the legislature. Any intimation of interfering with his person or habit, or special care like confining him to one place, seems to frighten him beyond all control. He was in court yesterday when Judge Allen made his remarks and ran out of the court room – couldn't be checked by his attorneys or others without personal violence. I have searched diligently for him since without success. – George W. Clark.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-13-1897 – Buckskin Jimmy's Estate – District Court Will Try to Unravel an Alleged Snarl in Accounts – Judge Allen's time in division 4 was consumed yesterday afternoon in hearing the motion for an arrest of judgment against George W. Cole, conservator of the estate of James Thomas, known as Buckskin Jimmy, an alleged lunatic. Cole contends that the estate owes him quite a sum of money for his services, while two juries have decided that he is indebted to the estate in the sum of $2,700. He claims that the juries had no right to fix the amount of interest alleged due. The court took the matter under advisement.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-20-1897 – Buckskin Jimmy's Estate – Conservator Cole Found to Be in Arrears Nearly $3,000 – George W. Cole, conservator of the estate of James Thomas, alleged insane and known as Buckskin Jimmie, has been declared indebted to his charge in the sum of $2,754.05, and this sum he is ordered to pay into court. Cole has met with considerable difficulty since his appointment as conservator and recently avowed that he had spent all the money in his hands belonging to the estate of Thomas and that, moreover, the estate was indebted to him in the sum of $1,000. He was found to be indebted to Thomas a short time ago for several hundred dollars, but prayed for an arrest of judgment. This was denied by Judge Allen yesterday and the sum named found due from him. He will pray an appeal to the court of appeals under $3,500.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 9-14-1897 – Supreme Court Notes – The record in the case of George W. Cole against the estate of James Thomas, “Buckskin Jimmy,” a lunatic, was filed with the court this morning.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 9-15-1897 – Dockets Are Well Filled – A large number of cases have been filed in the supreme court and in the court of appeals within the last few days… G. W. Cole vs. estate of James Thomas, a lunatic. Thomas is known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” and the suit was brought through the Arapahoe courts.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 4-18-1899 – Denver Evening Post 4-18-1899 – Supreme Court Decisions – Cases Settled by the Appellate Tribunal – 3818 – George W. Cole, appellant, vs. the Estate of James Thomas, a lunatic, appellee; appeal from district court of Arapahoe county. Petition for rehearing, denied.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 5-20-1899 – Conservator and Money Gone – James Thomas, familiarly known to the people of Denver as “Buckskin Jimmy,” has been committed by Judge Steele to the county hospital for an indefinite period, and unless he is prevented from making his escape, the peculiar and pitiable picture he makes may not again be seen on the streets of the city. He was oftenest seen at the court house, which he was wont to frequent in a ragged Prince Albert coat and a battered high silk hat, munching decayed fruit. He went to the court house to watch the progress of his law suit, which was years in reaching a conclusion. Insane though he was, he knew enough to pursue it with intense interest, but he never followed it through the higher courts, supposing some procrastination kept the suit in the county court, where it was first begun. His helpless mental condition, with the positive evidence of his extreme poverty hanging on his person and the knowledge that he owned $2,300 that was tied up in the courts, made him tolerated among the people in far better circumstances. Often courts were inspired to exclaim that it was a shame that the poor old man should be permitted to go about in such abject poverty. “Buckskin Jimmy” is one of Denver's old-timers. He used to manufacture buckskin gloves, and made a fortune of $40,000 by it. He became mentally deranged and squandered much of the fortune before he was adjudged insane and a conservator appointed in the early '90s. He literally gave money away, but his estate did not so much dwindle by this means as by the rapacity of lawyers. To them he was a shining mark, and again and again they appeared in court as “Buckskin Jimmy's” next best friend, and mighty heavily they charged for their “acts of friendship.” Then came George W. Cole, who was appointed conservator. Cole did try to do something for Thomas, but Jimmy was independent in his ways and refused to be guided by his conservator. Cole took all of Thomas' money in charge with the result that soon there was nothing. Judge Steele called him to account for $2,300, but Cole declared that he owed the estate nothing; rather the estate owed him for the care that he had taken of Thomas and his estate. The “care” excited humor at the time, in view of the results, and Judge Steele was going to remove Cole and throw him into jail. Cole appealed to the district court, where a judgment was found against him. He appealed again to the supreme court, where last March he again met with defeat. This was “Buckskin Jimmy's” law suit. Cole applied for a rehearing in the supreme court which, after some weeks, was denied. After more delay the district court was informed that its judgment had been affirmed and after still further delay the county court was told that it had unrestricted control over Cole and Thomas. Judge Steele immediately issued a citation summoning Cole into court, but the sheriff's office has not been able to find him. It is known that he has left Denver. However, he had a number of bondsmen. “Buckskin Jimmy,” up to the immediate present, has been harmless. He has, however, developed dangerous tendencies in the direction of horsestealing and arson. He was apprehended on Wednesday in Jefferson county on the Fairview road to Boulder driving a sick horse and buggy. The horse was sick with colic and Humane Agent Wilmore was notified. He took the horse away from Jimmy and next day it had to be shot. Jimmy proceeded on his way to Boulder, dragging the buggy. He soon tired and was seen afterward to set fire to the bridge in Arvada. Yesterday he was arrested on the city streets by the police where he was found leading two starved horses. He could not tell where he had obtained all this property. He was taken before Judge Steele who ordered him sent to the county hospital from whence he may ultimately be sent to Pueblo. Judge Steele will remove Cole and appoint another conservator in his place. Thomas is more than 70 years old.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 2-20-1899 – Supreme Court Announcements – The supreme court made the following announcements this morning: 3818 – In re estate of James Thomas, a lunatic. George W. Cole, conservator, appellant. Appeal from the district court of Arapahoe county. Judgment modified and affirmed. Opinion by Mr. Justice Gabbert.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 2-24-1899 – Strictly By Law – Bleeding of Buckskin Jimmy's Estate Stopped For a While – The supreme court in a decision yesterday written by Judge Gabbert, orders George W. Cole, conservator of the estate of James Thomas, a weak-minded man commonly known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” to pay certain moneys back to the estate. The money ordered refunded amounts to about over $2,500. “Buckskin Jimmy” has been a familiar figure on the city streets. He was once worth $50,000, this wealth being acquired by the manufacture of buckskin gloves by him in Denver. More than a dozen years ago he became demented and when George W. Miller was county judge was declared insane. Conservator after conservator and lawyer after lawyer, whether officially appointed or not, acting self-appointed as his next best friend, fattened off the estate, the last being Cole himself, with former Judge Miller as his attorney. Finally the estate dwindled down to $5,000, and to most of this money Cole laid claim for alleged services, etc., tying the money up in the courts where it has been for a final decision for half a dozen years, Cole appealing from court to court, and Buckskin Jimmy, having literally nothing and refusing all charity, housing himself in an hall where he was permitted to sleep, and eating out of garbage cans. To the last he carried with him an air of distinction, always wearing, though very much soiled, a Prince Albert coat and a silk hat. He haunted the courts, mutely demanding a decision in his case, frequently attracting the sympathy of the judges who would roast Cole for his unjust fight and his outrageous neglect of his helpless lunatic, and then sustain Cole in his technicalities. But Cole and Miller were callous and nothing would induce Thomas to abide in a lunatic asylum, where he would have had some care; he always ran away; the authorities tired of arresting him, and denounced the law's delay. An order in the county court still allows Thomas $5 a week, but Cole has refused this until $1,953.89 be paid him for compensation for “taking care” of Thomas. Cole has been administrator since 1890 and asks $300 a year compensation. How the irresponsible Thomas was bled by the conservator may be understood by the following item which one county judge disallowed: “Attorney's fees, $250; compensation of conservator, $2,295; attendance on probate court, $180; and commissions, $282.39.” Judge Gabbert said: “The fund over which this controversy arises came into the hands of the conservator in 1889 - $4,500 on March 30 and $146.50 on April 15. The larger sum, it seems, was in a safety deposit vault at the time of his appointment, and the other received in the shape of a draft. He was directed to pay his ward $5 a week for his support. He never made any investment of these funds, nor attempted to, and excuses his failure to do so for the reason that he had been told that his duty was to keep them on hand, to turn over to his ward promptly in the event that the latter should be declared sane. Apparently this advice or direction was given by the then judge of the county court of Arapahoe county. The conservator states emphatically that he never used any of these funds in his own business, except for a short period, when they were evidently mingled with his own, although the evidence regarding the time they were kept separate and apart from his is indefinite. The duties of the conservator of the estate of the lunatic require him to exercise reasonable care and diligence in investing the funds which come into his hands as such * * * (actual text) but to invest them in a safe and permanent manner with the view of deriving an income for the benefit of his ward, so that the principal may not be necessarily depleted from his support, and if any of these duties are neglected, the loss must fall on the conservator and not on the estate.”

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 9-4-1899 – Buckskin Jimmy Back – James Thomas, “Buckskin Jimmy,” has been recovered and once more is lodged in the county hospital. He is insane and has been committed there by County Judge Steele but escaped three weeks. He was once worth $40,000, but a court appointed a conservator for his estate and he is penniless.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 7-21-1899 – Conservator G. W. Cole Jailed – The Man Who Saved So Much of Buckskin Jimmy's Estate That None of it Was Left For Jimmy Ventured Back into Colorado and Was Promptly Arrested – George W. Cole, the unremoved conservator of the estate of James Thomas, “Buckskin Jimmy,” is a prisoner in the county jail. He had been given up as hopelessly escaped from the jurisdiction of the law of the state of Colorado, but as it appears he could not keep away from the Centennial state and he must pay $2,300 or stay in jail unless the ever ready injunction defeats the ends of justice. Cole was arrested yesterday at Idaho Springs and brought to Denver last evening and placed in the county jail by Deputy Sheriff Murray who effected the arrest. It is said that Cole had come into the state just for a rush trip to Idaho Springs. He has been conservator of Thomas' estate for many years and since his incumbency it has dwindled to nothing. County Judge Steele called him to account and ordered him to pay upwards of $2,500 to the estate. He maintained that in fact the estate owed him that sum for services to the district court. After a sensational trial Judge Allen found against him and he appealed to the supreme court which several months ago found against him, fixing the sum he owed to the estate at about $2,300. In all this litigation he was defended by Attorney George W. Miller, who, when county judge, appointed Cole conservator of Thomas' estate. After a rehearing was denied by the court Cole disappeared and nothing was heard of him until his foray into Idaho Springs. The Thomas estate was once estimated at $40,000. It belonged to “Buckskin Jimmy,” who was adjudged insane. He recklessly threw away much of his wealth; attorneys obtained a very large slice of it and then the county court took a hand and under its conservatorship it has disappeared entirely except the claim of $2,300 against Cole and his bondsmen. Attempts have been made to restrain Thomas in some retreat but he usually effects his escape and has been a familiar figure about the streets of Denver in a dirty Prince Albert coat and a much dilapidated silk hat. His home has been hallways and his food too frequently subsistence from garbage barrels. His case has excited widespread sympathy especially at the court house which he frequented demanding “justice.” He is now in the county hospital. This morning Judge Steele ordered Cole to be arraigned tomorrow morning to show cause why he should not be imprisoned for contempt of court. The judge placed his bonds for release until that time at $1,000. Up to noon today he had found no bondsmen.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 8-19-1899 – May Be Two Years – Conservator of “Buckskin Jimmy” Seems Doomed to a Long Imprisonment – George W. Cole, who is accused of misappropriating funds that belonged to “Buckskin Jimmy” Thomas and rendering the decrepit old man homeless and destitute, is liable to remain in jail indefinitely. Cole was conservator of the lunatic's estate for a number of years, and has been charged from time to time with practically robbing it of all the money that came in from sales of property and other sources. In one transaction where Cole is said to have used the proceeds of a judgment of $2,700 for his personal benefit, he was arrested and brought into court. The judge gave him a certain number of days in which to pay back the money to Buckskin Jimmy or go to jail, and then discharged him from the conservatorship of the estate. Cole failed to obtain the necessary cash to comply with the court's order. His defense was that he would do so if allowed additional time, as he said he was about to close a mining deal which would net him enough money to clear up the debt. The court, however, had had an experience with Cole's promises before, so his request for more time was refused, and he went to the county jail. The former conservator claims he has been unmercifully persecuted. Two weeks ago today he applied to the court of appeals to be released on a writ of supersedeas. The court granted the writ with the proviso that Cole guarantee to pay Thomas the $2,700 as soon as he could get it. This was made binding by an order for Cole to furnish a bond of $3,000 within fifteen days, subject to the approval of the court. The fifteen days were up at noon today. Cole was unable to furnish the bond, and therefore will have to stay in jail until he can raise $2,700. As Cole states that it will be impossible to raise the cash unless he gets it himself, he seems to be doomed to imprisonment for a long time. His case is in the appellate court on an appeal, but the chances are that it will not be reached before the end of eighteen months or two years.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 11-19-1899 – The choking of an insane man to death. The brutal treatment of James Thomas, the decrepit, half insane “Buckskin Jimmy.” Food not fit to be fed to hogs, much less to patients, demanding the best of care and nutritious diet. ___ ____ from the porters and the ______ of nurses, many of whom are inexperienced. Foul, nauseating odors that are allowed to permeate the buildings. Such are the claims in an indictment against the county hospital. It is told by I. N. Tooke, a well known mining man and promoter, whose friends took him from the hospital last week. What he saw while an inmate of the institution is of such disgusting brutality that it justifies his impassioned statement: “If the people of Denver knew what was going on at the county hospital they would tear it down and burn it up.” … But even more brutal than that was the treatment accorded poor, old, half-demented Buckskin Jimmy. He was locked in a cell, ending his last years amid abuse that would wring your heart. He never said a word to anyone, except to beg for a newspaper. These he reads and, if anything attracts his fancy, tears it out and sticks it in the breast pocket of his shiny old Prince Albert coat. I had been at the hospital a few days only when the incident occurred. Knowing the old man's fondness for newspapers I was, more than once, the medium through which he was gratified. I was standing at the door of the cell in the insane ward occupied by Jimmy, when Charlie, the head porter, unlocked the door and went in. The porter, a great burly giant in comparison to the weak, inoffensive idiot, seeing the breast of his coat protruding, immediately began to dispossess Jimmy of his newspaper clippings. Like a child, the old man resisted, with pleading face and holding his hands over the miserable makeshift of a garment he was wearing. The porter, whose first name was Charlie, losing his temper, struck the old man full in the face with a blow that could be heard the length of ward 3. Shrieking, Jimmy staggered back, when the porter, seizing him by the back, threw him in a passion, to the floor, where he stamped upon and kicked him. It was fearful. I was so sick at the sight that my brain reeled. I shall never forget it – no, not to my dying day. Bloody and sobbing, stiffened with pain and shrinking like a wounded beast, the old man, little more than a child, in truth, crawled to the further end of the cell and exclaimed: “You brute!” That threw the porter into a rage. For a moment he glanced at the cowering figure, then threw him with a crash against the wall and to the floor, using vile epithets for the miserable bundle of bones and blood. That was all. The door clanged to, an oath, and more dead than alive, Jimmy laid like the dead in his narrow little torture chamber. (Buckskin Jimmy escaped from the hospital last Thursday. – Ed. Post.) I could not stand it. It was too barbarously cruel. I was tingling with shame that I was powerless to give the brute that had trampled on the helpless idiot the trashing he deserved. I hurried to the head nurse, Mrs. Burgett, and told her in detail of the horrible scene I had witnessed. She did not appear horrified, but made me promise not to tell anything to the superintendent, to keep the matter quiet and that she would see the porter behaved differently in the future. Did she keep her word? No. The head nurse never comes around. The porters do the work of nurses and there is a lack of system from one end to the other. Neither does Superintendent Sheriff take the trouble to inspect the hospital… I am willing to make an affidavit to everything I have said. It is gospel truth. I tell it because I am going to do everything I can for the poor wretches who are dying there in a manner that the Humane society would prevent, was it accorded to dogs.” (Mr. Tooke willingly gave the affidavit accompanying this article, after reading it over word for word, and making a few minor corrections. Ed. Post.) Note: Portions of this article were of poor copy quality and unreadable.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 11-28-1899 – Buckskin Jimmy Missing – The Harmless Old Lunatic Has Not Been Seen Since He Was Reported as Having Escaped From the County Hospital – What has become of “Buckskin Jimmy?” The question has been asked before when James Thomas, the harmless imbecile, nicknamed as above, and whom all Denver has known and pitied for years, has made one of his eccentric disappearances. But it is asked with far greater seriousness now, as the period of his absence grows and grows. Besides, there are circumstances connected with this disappearance that are different from those surrounding his other comings and goings. At the time of his disappearance and for some months prior thereto, he was an inmate of the insane ward of the county hospital. He was past 60 years of age, and, besides being old he was weak and worn and ill; furthermore, if the sworn statement of Ira N. Tooke, another inmate of the county hospital is to be credited, he had been horribly beaten and abused a short time before he was reported as having escaped. Here is an extract from Tooke's affidavit which was published in The Post Sunday, Nov. 19: “Knowing the old man's (Buckskin Jimmy's) fondness for newspapers, I was more than once the medium through which he was gratified. I was standing at the door of the cell in the insane ward occupied by Jimmy, when Charlie, the head porter, unlocked the door and went in. The porter, a great, burly giant in comparison to the weak and inoffensive idiot, seeing the breast of his coat protruding, immediately began to dispossess Jimmy of his newspaper clippings. Like a child, the old man resisted and with pleading face and holding his hands over the miserable makeshift of a garment he was wearing. The porter, whose first name was Charlie, losing his temper, struck the old man full in the face, with a blow that could be heard the length of ward 3. Shrieking, Jimmy staggered back, when the porter, seizing him by the back, threw him in a passion to the floor, where he stamped upon and kicked him. It was fearful. I was so sickened at the sight that my brain reeled. I shall never forget it; no, not to my dying day. Bloody and sobbing, stiffened with pain and shrinking like a wounded beast, the old man, crawled to the further end of the cell and exclaimed: “You brute!” That threw the porter in a rage. For a moment he glanced at the cowering figure, then threw him with a crash against the wall and to the floor, using vile epithets for the miserable bundle of bones and blood. That was all. The door clanged to and, more dead than alive, Jimmy lay in his narrow little torture chamber.” When this was read by Attorney Benjamin B. Lindsey, public administrator and attorney representing the interests of the insane Buckskin Jimmy, a week ago last Sunday, he was appalled at the cruelties charged. Reading on he was further astounded by the announcement that Jimmy had been reported missing Thursday, Nov. 16. No report had been made to him and he determined to investigate at once. Now that the condition of the old man at the time of his disappearance is known, it is well to take a brief backward glance at his history. James Thomas, “Buckskin Jimmy,” was formerly a prosperous glove maker. His mind began to be affected and he grew worse and worse until, some years ago, he was adjudged insane by a jury in the county court. The history of his case in the courts was summarized very succinctly by Attorney Lindsey this morning. “One George W. Cole was the administrator of Jimmy's estate,” said Mr. Lindsey, “and he proved false to his trust; in fact, stole about everything of which Jimmy was possessed. Attorney H. S. Vaughan acted as conservator for the estate and brought suit against Cole's bondsmen. These were Robert A. Duncan of Boulder, and J. B. Hindry and Julius Brown. He secured judgment for something like $3,000 and appeal was taken to the district court, where a judgment for $2,700 was obtained. The case was appealed to the supreme court and judgment for $2,303.37 was affirmed, which, together with interest, brought the entire sum up to $2,874.12. This sum is now due, and, by the way, this is the last day Cole's bondsmen have in which to appear and combat the taking of judgment against them. That is the condition of his affairs. Some of the bondsmen are solvent, and we believe we can collect the judgment. Now I come to Jimmy himself, and I want to tell you that I am worried half to death about the old fellow. Having been adjudged insane he should have been sent to the asylum long ago, but instead he has been allowed to go at large a great deal of the time, though now and then, because of his eccentricities, he has been arrested and the last time Judge Steele ordered that he be confined in the county hospital. Judge Steele left Denver Nov. 11, and before he started he asked me to see Judge Jacobs and Attorney Vaughan and arrange to have Jimmy sent to the asylum. On Nov. 13 Mr. Vaughan went to the Judge Jacobs about it, and the judge told him that he would see Mr. Bishop of the county commissioners and arrange to have Jimmy sent to the asylum, the order having already been entered. My attention was next called to Jimmy by the account I read in The Post Sunday, Nov. 19, which told of the alleged brutal treatment of Jimmy and his escape from the hospital. It worried me so that I could scarcely get any sleep that night. Though not responsible for anything that may have happened to him, I felt that I was, in a way, one of his guardians, and I could not bear to think of the possible harm that may have come to him. Early the next morning I went to see Chief of Police Farley and asked him to keep a lookout for Jimmy. The weather has been quite cold at night, and in Jimmy's weak condition I feared he might have lain down and died. And, although I am not in the least superstitious, I confess I have had a premonition, or, rather, a deep impression, that something has gone wrong with the old man. Chief Farley promised to do all in his power to locate Jimmy, and then I went to see Mr. Vaughan. He was as much astonished as I was, and at once called up the hospital by 'phone and asked what had become of Jimmy. He told me afterward that Superintendent Sheriff had said in answer that during the burning of the buildings at D. W. C. park on Tuesday night, Nov. 14, a week previous, while the guards were watching the conflagration, Jimmy had escaped. I went to see Sheriff and he told me that Jimmy was very cunning and that it was hard to keep him safely, that he had eluded the guards and escaped. I called his attention to The Post's account of the frightful brutality of which Jimmy was alleged to have been the victim, and I told him that it looked very bad, and that if I concluded that facts warranted it, I would insist upon making a thorough investigation. He smiled at the excitement I manifested and said that Jimmy had often gotten out before and had been retaken, and that once he had come back of his own accord. 'He'll be back in a few days,' said he, and so I left him. Since then I have heard nothing further, but I am still harassed by doubts of his well being and, in fact of his very existence. I cannot understand the negligence of the hospital officials in notifying us of Jimmy's escape. We should have been notified at once. Had we been apprised of it immediately we would have been able to trace him up and take care of him, poor, weak, half-clad, demented old man! I am going up to see Mr. Vaughan today about offering a reward for him. I don't care if I have to pay it out of my own pocket, I must find him and aid him if he is still on earth. Twice Chief Farley has instructed all policemen and detectives to make all possible search for Buckskin Jimmy, but no tidings of him have come to hand. Everybody on the force knows Jimmy and nearly every old citizen of Denver does the same. To show that he is incapable of concealing himself for any considerable length of time, some of his eccentric habits of life may be mentioned. His first exhibition of insanity was noticed some years ago when, mounted on an old horse he began to ride aimlessly up and down the narrowest alleys of the city. Afterward he lived in a shack down on Second street, near Larimer street. Here his companion was a dog. Once in awhile he would get hold of a nickel and buy a glass of beer in a cheap saloon, and soaking in the beer bits of stale bread from the free lunch counter, would make a meal of the mixture. Then he got to patronizing garbage cans, eating the dirty crusts and filthy bits of meat thrown away by the cooks at cheap restaurants.” “He could not be at large without some of the police seeing him,” said a man who has known Jimmy for years. “Both he and his habits are too familiar to everybody; besides, he is mentally incapable of keeping his whereabouts concealed.” The old man always heretofore has been recaptured within a few days of his escape. And so, with only the knowledge that he was reported to have escaped on the night of the D. W. C. park fire – reported to the police two days later and never reported to his attorneys until they began an investigation – with only the sworn statement of a fellow inmate of the hospital that he had been horribly, bloodily beaten and maltreated – the search proceeds and there remains only the same old question: What has become of Buckskin Jimmy?

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 11-29-1899 – Buckskin Safe – He Will Not Be Sent to the Hospital – “Well, Buckskin Jimmy is safe enough now,” said Attorney Benjamin B. Lindsey, who is one of the legal representatives of the poor, old, demented wanderer. “I am glad Policeman Cornell found him. You don't know what a relief it was to me to know that he was alive and as well as one in his deplorable condition can hope to be. And I want to thank The Post for its aid in the matter. I don't believe anybody would have taken the trouble to hunt him up if The Post had not stirred up interest in the old man and his affairs.” “Will you return Jimmy to the hospital?” Mr. Lindsey was asked. “Not much we won't,” he replied. “We have had enough of the county hospital. We'll take no more chances of ill treatment and neglect. He was removed to the county jail this morning, and by order of the county court, made today, he is to be sent to the asylum at Pueblo. I had is specially understood that he is to leave in charge of a deputy sheriff tonight.” In connection with this disposition of Jimmy there came up a singular incident at the county court this morning. Former County Judge Miller appeared and asked Judge Jacobs for an order for the liberation tomorrow, and only for tomorrow, of George W. Cole, the defaulting conservator of James Thomas' estate, from the county jail, in order that he may eat the fatted turkey and drink a bottle of claret with his friends on Thanksgiving day. The friends will not dine with him at the county jail, but have invited him out – that is, if he can get out. Miller spoke with oiled words about the way the milk of human kindness should seethe on Thanksgiving day, especially for Cole. It was while Miller was judge that he made Cole conservator of Thomas' estate, and Cole as soon as Miller left the bench appointed him attorney for the estate. In that time some $40,000 of Buckskin Jimmy's estate disappeared. Judge Jacobs said he read the Denver newspapers even in Weld county, and remembered very well that Cole had been ordered to pay Thomas' estate nearly $3,000 by the supreme court and had been indefinitely imprisoned by Judge Steele until he should do so. “And do you think he will get back to the jail?” asked the judge, pertinently. He remembered Cole's attempts to elude arrest and imprisonment. “I hadn't thought of that,” answered Miller, crestfallen. The judge dismissed the request by saying he would take it under advisement.

Thomas, James
Denver Evening Post 12-8-1899 – Protested Against Buckskin's Fate – W. W. Cover, a retired attorney, appeared before the county commissioners to protest against what he called the locking in and imprisonment of James Thomas, familiarly known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” for the squandering of whose large estate his former conservator is now serving an indefinite term in the county jail. Cover maintained that Thomas is being unlawfully restrained from his liberty, that he is not, in fact, insane, and has never been legally adjudged so. The attorney warned the county commissioners that the county would have to pay the state for the maintenance of Thomas at the state asylum at Pueblo, and this being the case, and the fact known that Thomas could not be legally detained, the asylum authorities apprehensive of receiving no compensation for keeping him there would liberate him. Cover did not suggest what would become of the unfortunate old man if free. The attorney said: “The insanity proceedings were begun 15 years ago, and since then the $40,000 has virtually been squandered and the man robbed by the proceedings of the county court. He is not insane, and has never been legally so adjudged. Everything is void, but I cannot tell you why the judge overrides the law and the liberty of persons. I have been his attorney, and when the case was in the district court a district judge asked me to see that this relief should be secured for a 73-year-old man. He has won out in all the courts and recently the supreme court has said that Cole must pay back $2,300. Judge Steele is away and another judge is making an attempt at the estate. He even sent Thomas to the state asylum and I had no notice of this step, although I have been Thomas' attorney for fifteen years. Why, years ago, they even spirited Thomas into Canada. There he had $600 and when he came back they had taken away all except $140. Why, they admit that Thomas had $5,000 in gold in the bank and then they charged $7,000 for paying out that $5,000.” The attorney warned the county against paying any of the bills of the state for Thomas and then said: “If Jim Thomas had a little money I could regulate matters for him. But the courts cost money and he has to have it to get a habeas corpus, which I think he could obtain any day. It is a shame and disgrace to put him on the expense of the county.” Thomas has $2,300 coming to him from Cole's bondsmen if they ever discharge their obligations and Cover seems to know it. He seemed to want authority from the courts to appear for “Buckskin Jimmy.” There would be a fee in it. Chairman Bishop in reply said that the commissioners could not override any order of the court, so the board was helpless to proceed even if it had any disposition to do so. The county attorney said that Thomas had been legally adjudged insane and legally committed and that so far as his expense at Pueblo is concerned the county does not meet it. The asylum is maintained at the state's expense. It would require a special act of the legislature to reimburse the state from the county for the maintenance of Thomas. And there the matter was dropped.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 8-21-1885 – Buckskin “Jimmy” – An Old Time Denver Character Charged With Lunacy – A complaint for lunacy has been made in the County court against James Thomas, better known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” who has a glove manufactory on Fifteenth street, and who is quite an expert in his way in the hide and skin business. “Buckskin Jimmy” has been in the courts a good deal lately and a sudden experience of the wiles and wickedness of lawyers may have turned his head. He is an old hunter and trapper and used to trade a great deal with Indians in earlier days. He is rather unused to the ways of civilization and figured lately as defendant in a rather peculiar larceny case, the facts of which were somewhat as follows: “Jimmy” had a debtor who had an old broken-down spring wagon. Not believing he could get his pay in any way, Jimmy seized the wagon and drove it out into the country without going to the trouble and expense of any legal process. As a matter of course the wagon was brought back and “Buckskin Jimmy” arrested for larceny, but when the facts came out he was discharged. Whether this scrape with lawyers and Justice courts turned Jimmy's head or not is only a matter of conjecture, but it would seem that lately he has been giving away a great deal of his property and has been spending money profusely and recklessly, buying old broken-down horses and wagons, investing in a ranch and spending money for numerous things which he does not need nor want. His friends and acquaintances believe that he is crazy, and D. K. Wall, who is one of his oldest and most intimate friends, has brought complaint of lunacy against him. Judge Harrington being absent from the city, no order has been made in the case yet.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 8-30-1885 – Said to Be Crazy – James Taylor, “Buckskin Jimmy,” who is charged by his friends with being a lunatic is said to have been playing a number of new capers recently. He has, it is said, been trying recently to buy D. K. Wall's stuffed horse and offered a big price for the “animal.” Mr. Taylor is worth $10,000 in money and property. Complaint for lunacy has been made in the County court against “Jimmy,” but Judge Harrington has as yet issued no order in the case.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 9-11-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas, a lunatic; James Shell, Jr., appointed conservator.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 10-13-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas; lunatic; inventory filed, examined and approved.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 10-20-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; motion to respondent and quash citation and dismiss; petition set for hearing Tuesday, October 20.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 10-20-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; appointment bill filed, examined and approved.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 10-23-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate Business – Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; motion to strike out parts of petition of conservator set for hearing October 24; complaint filed, order for arrest, etc., issued, W. W. Coons appointed guardian ad litem.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-7-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – People vs. James Thomas; lunatic; case set for trial December 5; W. W. Cover, guardian ad litem.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-7-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Claim of Wall & Purcell vs. estate of James Thomas, lunatic; set for hearing December 12.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-13-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Wall & Purcell vs. estate of James Thomas, lunatic; case taken under advisement

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-27-1885 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas, claims of Jacob Daniels and U. S. Daniels set for trial Thursday, January 7.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-1-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas; order setting claims of Jacob Daniels and U. S. Daniels for trial on Thursday, January 7, vacated and claims re-set for trial on Friday, January 15, at 7:30 a.m., at costs of claimants; by consent claim of H. Anderson set for trial on Friday, January 15, 1886.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-17-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – George D. Anderson vs. estate of James Thomas, lunatic; trial of claim; claim allowed in the sum of $17; plaintiff to pay cost of attendance and service of subpoenas on his witnesses, estate to pay remainder of costs.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-17-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Jacob Daniels vs. estate of James Thomas; on motion of claimant claim dismissed without prejudice at his costs.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-17-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – U. Schuyler Daniels vs. estate of James Thomas; same order as in last above (on motion of claimant claim dismissed without prejudice at his costs).

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-17-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas; motion of Jacob Daniels to strike out parts of petition of conservator heretofore argued and taken under advisement sustained; on motion of conservator, further proceedings herein dismissed.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-21-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; by consent claim of Raymond Squires & Co. set for trial January 21.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-23-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Raymond, Squires & Co. vs. Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; on motion of claimant, conservator consenting, further trial continued until February 10, 1886.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-24-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; on petition of conservator he has leave to purchase abstract of title to lots 17 and 18, block 6, East Denver.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-3-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; petition of conservator to sell certain personal property for less than approved value granted; petition to repair certain buildings granted and petition granted also to lease certain premises.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 12-7-1886 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas; lunatic; report of sale of personal property approved.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-12-1887 – The Courts – County Court – Probate List – Estate of James Thomas; lunacy; inquiry into restoration of reason of alleged lunatic continued until April 18.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-19-1887 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas; inquiry into the restoration to reason of James Thomas, an alleged lunatic, re-set by stipulation for April 25. Order for venire granted.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 1-18-1888 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of James Thomas; order for alias writ of scire facias to James Thomas to show cause why execution should not issue on the judgment of the court allowing a certain claim; returnable February 1.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-27-1895 – Civil Court Briefs – The case brought by “Buckskin Jimmie,” otherwise James Thomas, in the county court to have control of his property was concluded yesterday and the court found that he had not yet fully recovered his reason. George W. Cole, conservator, was ordered to file a new bond within three days.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-28-1887 – Restored to Reason – James Thomas, Better Known as “Buckskin Jimmy,” is Declared to be Fully Able to Manage His Own Affairs – A jury in the county court yesterday found that James Thomas had been restored to reason and was now capable of managing his property and his financial affairs. The conservator, Samuel Shell, will, in accordance with this verdict, probably be removed as soon as he files his final report. This case has been long enough in the County court to be regarded as a cause cebbre (?), and it has involved a large amount of litigation of a most varied character. “Buckskin Jimmy,” James Thomas, is an old timer who spent his earlier years in Colorado as a trapper and hunter and dealer in furs and skins. Dealing with Indians, frontiersmen and old time Coloradoans, he probably has imbibed ideas of business, ownership of property and financial affairs in general a little at varience in some respects with more modern notions of such matters. In appearance Mr. Thomas bears little resemblance to a lunatic. He is a little, dark complexioned man who dresses in black and who wears a black stove pipe hat. He kept for a number of years a little old rookery for a glove and leather store and his goods were always in great demand. In his management of his own business affairs he has showed some eccentricity, some apparent extravagance and some queer ideas as to property. Whether or not this constituted just grounds for regarding Mr. Thomas as insane or for appointing a guardian or conservator over him or his property, is a subject which has puzzled judges, juries or attorneys for some time. The verdict of the jury yesterday probably settles the question and gives Thomas the right to use his rather good-sized earthly possessions as he sees fit.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 6-11-1889 – Local Brevities – “Buckskin Jimmy,” formerly worth $100,000, was arrested last evening for being insane.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 7-12-1891 – The Courts – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: Lunacy; James Thomas; reset for July 15.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 7-16-1891 – The Courts – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: Lunacy; James Thomas; hearing set for July 17.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 7-18-1891 – The Courts – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: Lunacy; James Thomas; hearing as to restoration to sanity set for July 31.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 9-2-1891 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: In re, lunacy of James Thomas; hearing continued by agreement.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 6-3-1892 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: Lunacy of James Thomas; trial reset by agreement for June 7.

Thomas, James
Rocky Mountain News 4-11-1893 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Le Fevre – The following business was transacted yesterday: Estate of James Thomas, lunatic; Willard Milligan and Marcus A. Haines have leave to withdraw file for five days.

Thomas, James
James Thomas, better known as “Buckskin Jimmey,” a State-wide character, died at the State Insane Asylum in Pueblo on October 28, 1911, at the age of 82 years. Mr. Thomas had been an inmate of the asylum for 6 or 7 years. He located in Denver in 1860 and amassed a fortune trading with the Indians. Later he lost much money through the dishonesty of one of his employees, but recovered part of it. Unfortunate investments gradually dissipated his wealth and he died in poverty. Mr. Thomas lived in Denver from the time he came to the territory in 1860 until he was taken to Pueblo to end his days in the asylum.

Thomas, John
Carbonate Chronicle 12-31-1917 – Local Chronology, 1917 – January 6, 1917 – John Downey and John Thomas are ordered taken to state insane asylum by lunacy board of county court.

Thomas, John R.
Eagle County Blade 7-17-1902 – John R. Thomas Insane – About five years ago John R. Thomas, then a resident of Bell's Camp on Battle mountain, became insane and attempted to do himself bodily harm.  Thomas got into his bed in his cabin and then set the bedding on fire.  He was rescued by neighbors who discovered the fire, before he was badly burned.  He was taken into custody by Sheriff Fleck, and after being guarded a few days recovered and was released.  It was thought at the time that his temporary derangement was due to excessive drinking.  For some time he has resided in Leadville, and last week again became insane.  The Herald Democrat has the following account of his conduct: “John R. Thomas, arrested a few days ago on a lunacy charge and who has since been confined in the jail, is becoming vicious.  Last night he attempted to assault a friend who called to see him.  Thomas will spread his blanket on the floor of the jail and then imagine there is a corpse under it.  He told Sheriff Long that a woman, a neighbor of his on Frost street, had died and that it was her corpse which was under the blanket.  He will probably be given a hearing today and be committed to the insane asylum.”  On last Friday his case came up in the County court of Lake county, and he was convicted of insanity and is now confined in the asylum at Pueblo.

Thomas, John R.
patient race: W sex: M age: 61 marital:S place of birth: Wales occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thomas, John R.
Carbonate Chronicle 10-31-1910 – Taken To Pueblo – Undersheriff Dwyer and a deputy yesterday morning took John R. Thomas, who was recently adjudged insane in the county court to the Pueblo asylum. Since his capture at the Moore dairy on Saturday, Thomas has grown gradually worse and was in a very bad condition when removed from the local jail yesterday. The insane man began his third term in the asylum yesterday. Thomas became extremely violent in his actions in the jail Tuesday afternoon and attacked three of the prisoners, the men being forced to fight for their safety, and but for the arrival of jailer Brennan on the scene they might have been seriously injured.

Thomas, John R.
Carbonate Chronicle 12-18-1916 – Mentally Deranged – John R. Thomas, a pioneer resident, suffering from a recurrence of mental derangement which troubled him a number of years ago, was taken into custody yesterday morning and lodged in the county jail for safe-keeping, pending a more satisfactory disposition of his case. Postmaster M. J. Brennan observed Thomas acting strangely in East Ninth street yesterday and reported to Sheriff Schraeder. Ten years ago Thomas was taken to the insane asylum, where he was cared for three years. After recovering from his derangement to a certain extent, he was released and he later returned to Leadville. He has made a livelihood here by sharpening knives and tools. During the fall, however, he had been employed in the potato fields around Eagle, and had just returned to Leadville when his reason became unbalanced again. He has no relatives here, so far as known.

Thomas, John William
patient during 1930-1940 due to a head injury, and died at the hospital. Born April 27, 1881.

Thomas, Mattie
Rocky Mountain News 3-19-1894 – Local Brevities – Mattie Thomas, an insane colored woman, was taken to the hospital yesterday.

Thomas, Mattie
Rocky Mountain News 3-20-1894 – Local Brevities – Millie Thomas, the colored woman who became insane and was removed to the county hospital Saturday, died yesterday morning.

Thomas, Thomas
patient race W gender M age 65 marital status S place of birth Wales source 1910 census

Thomas, Tom
Telluride Journal 12-6-1906 Is This Our Tom Thomas? A few days ago the Sentinel contained an announcement of the search being made for a man in Nevada by the name of Reed who has struck if rich for one Tom Thomas who befriended him and grub staked him six months ago when Reed was broke. Fortune having come his way he now wants to reward the man who loaned him $100 by giving him $50,000. Yesterday there came from Telluride a report stating that Tom Thomas, who has been a resident of that camp for thirty years, was on Saturday adjudged insane and taken to the asylum at Pueblo. Thomas is said to be fifty-five years of age and has led an adventurous life of a prospector since coming to Colorado. Several times he was owner of valuable mining properties, one of which he sold to the owners of the famous Tomboy mine. He was not married and has no relations in the state. It is possible that this Tom Thomas is the man that Reed is hunting. If it is and he is insane the fortune in store for him will not be of much pleasure to him. – Grand Junction Sentinel. It is doubtful if this is our Tom Thomas, as his finances the past few years were hardly such as to permit of his staking prospectors.

Thomas, Tom
Telluride Daily Journal 12-3-1906 – Sheriff Rutan (?) accompanied Uncle Tom Thomas to Pueblo Sunday morning.  It was hard to see the old timer starting for the insane asylum, but he will be more comfortable than in his old cabin at San Miguel, will be well cared for, and contemplation of his work for humanity in removing whole brigades of Molly Maguires and anarchists will furnish diversion for any little mind that is left to him.

Thomas, Tom
Telluride Daily Journal 5-17-1913 – Buried in Pueblo – Letters received here from a brother of Tom Thomas, who died in the state insane asylum last week state that Mr. Thomas was laid to rest in a Pueblo cemetery on Sunday last under the auspices of Pueblo Lodge No. 17, A. F. & A. M.  Mr. Thomas had been bed ridden for the past three years and his mind affected for the past four or five years.  He was 71 years old when he died and leaves two brothers and a sister, all residing in Pennsylvania, to mourn his loss.

Thomas, Tom
died 5-17-1913 buried Roselawn Cemetery, Pueblo, Colo.

Thomas, Tom
Telluride Journal 5-12-1910 – Frank P. Brown, while in Pueblo a few weeks ago called upon Old Tommy Thomas who is in the insane hospital. He found him very feeble and steadily failing, so weak he cannot sit up in bed. He readily recognized Mr. Brown but has lost himself, insisting that Tom Thomas is down in New York, and that he is one Everett, or some such name. The condition of the old pioneer is pitiful, but he seems to suffer little or no pain, and is rapidly approaching the end.

Thomas, Tom
12-7-1906 Ouray Plaindealer - Tom Thomas, a prospector all over the San Juan country since '77 was adjudged insane at Telluride this week and sent to Pueblo.

Thomas, Tony
patient gender M race W age 39 marital status S birthplace Austria source 1930 census

Thomas, W. Perry
Durango Wage Earner 11-15-1906 – Rev. W. Perry Thomas, an insane Episcopal clergyman who was taken from a private sanitarium and placed in the county hospital in Denver by Dean Hart because the expense to his church was too great, is receiving the attention of actors and a series of benefits are being planned for him.  The Post charges that the unfortunate man has been forgotten by his brother ministers.

Thomas, William
patient gender M race Neg age 50 marital status Wd birthplace Oklahoma source 1930 census

Thompson, Andrew J.
patient gender M race W age 47 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Thompson, Bridget
patient race W gender F month born April year born 1857 age 43 marital status W place of birth Ireland occupation housekeeper source : 1900 census

Thompson, Bridget
patient race W gender F age 52 marital status W place of birth Ireland occupation housekeeper source 1910 census

Thompson, Calvin
patient race W gender M age 44 marital status . place of birth . source 1910 census

Thompson, Claire H.
Carbonate Chronicle 5-31-1920 – Student Blackmailer Is Declared Insane – Fort Collins, Colo., May 28 – Claire H. Thompson, formerly an assistant instructor and student in the conservatory of music at the State Agricultural college, being held on a charge of attempted extortion of money by “black hand” letters, was declared insane in the county court this afternoon. Investigation of his sanity was ordered by District Judge George H. Bradfield and a commission consisting of Dr. W. A. Kirkland and Dr. T. C. Taylor was named in the county court to conduct the inquiry. They reported that they believed the young man insane. As a result, he will be taken to the state asylum at Pueblo tomorrow. Under the order of Judge Bradfield, however, he will have to stand trial on the extortion charge if he ever recovers. He is alleged to have attempted to force Charles R. Evans, a wealthy stockman and banker of this city, to give him $10,000. Mrs. Sarah E. Thompson of Baltimore, Mo., mother of the prisoner, arrived here yesterday to visit him and will accompany him to the asylum tomorrow. No word has been received from his wife and two small children believed to be living near Baltimore, since he was arrested. The doctors in their report to the court, stated that they could find no injuries to Thompson as a result of the fall from his bunk which recently rendered him unconscious for several hours.

Thompson, Clarendon H.
Fort Collins Courier 7-22-1920 – Wife of Claire Thomson Files Divorce Action – Alleges Husband's Attempt at Extortion Caused Her Humiliation; Two Children Named – Suit for divorce was filed in the Larimer county court at Fort Collins Thursday morning by Mrs. Hattie M. Thompson against Clarendon H. Thompson, formerly an instructor in the Colorado Agricultural college conservatory of music, who was adjudged insane recently following a fall from his bunk in the county jail, where he was held on a charge of attempted extortion, and who was sent to the state asylum for the insane at Pueblo.  The complaint alleges non-support and cruelty as cause for the action.  The couple were married at Baltimore, Md., June 8, 1911.  Thompson is said to have been unmanly and disrespectful in his conduct towards his wife, and to have so conducted himself in the presence of people with whom they associated as to bring embarrassment and humiliation upon her.  There are two children, Roselva M. Thompson, 6, and Newton H. Thompson, 4, of whom Mrs. Thompson asks custody.  Mrs. Thompson is now at Baltimore, Md., at the home of her father.  The complaint states her inability to support herself as the reason she is not personally in the county to file the suit.  Thompson last spring was apprehended upon charges of attempting to extort $10,000 by black hand methods from Charles R. Evans, a prominent banker of Fort Collins.  He was arrested and placed in the county jail following a sensational attempt to escape from the meshes of the net woven to frustrate his designs.  While sleeping in his bunk in the jail he fell out and is believed to have sustained an injury, from which he has never fully recovered.  In the latter part of May of this year, he was sent to the state asylum for the insane at Pueblo upon the findings of a county board of lunacy.  In the divorce complaint Mrs. Thompson specifies the attempted act of extortion by her husband as one of his acts which have brought humiliation upon her.

Thompson, Clarendon H.
Fort Collins Courier 11-26-1920 – Divorce Granted to Wife of Claire Thompson, Who Was Found Insane – Wife Tells Story of Unhappy Life with Talented Musician Whom She Charged With Cruelty – Hattie M. Thompson has just obtained an interlocutory decree of divorce in the Larimer county court from Clarendon H. Thompson, former instructor in music at the Colorado Agricultural college, who is now in the state insane asylum, where he was sent following his arrest on the charge of attempting to extort from Charles R. Evans $10,000 last spring, and his fall on his head from his bunk in the county jail from which he never recovered and which led to his being adjudged insane.  Mrs. Thompson is in Baltimore, Md., at the home of her father, Newton S. Watts, and her complaint, filed here some time ago, was substantiated by her testimony taken before a notary public there and sent to the local court with affidavits.  After considering this, with Thompson represented by Attorney George Shaw as guardian ad litem, Judge Jay H. Bouton granted the decree.  The grounds upon which Mrs. Thompson asked the divorce were non-support, cruelty, and the fact that Thompson had confessed to committing the crime for which he was arrested.  Father Supporting Her.  Mrs. Thompson stated in her testimony that she is 29 years of age, and she gave her residence as Loveland, Colo., where she was last living with her husband when he was an instructor in music at the ___mpion academy before coming to Fort Collins to teach at the Agricultural college and study music there.  They were married in Fowlesburg, Md., June 8, 1911, and have two children, Newton Hazemer, 4, and Roselva, 6.  Mrs. Thompson stated that she lived in Colorado from June, 1918, to June, 1919, when they had to get out of the house in which they were living because it was wanted by the owner and they had no other place to go, as her husband has just his position and was without money.  “Daddy had been sending me a check regularly every month for the past year for my support,” she stated, “because in the meanwhile he had visited me in Colorado and ___ and Mr. Thompson was going to ____ wall.”  In speaking of her husband's failure to support her she said, “During the last six months that I lived with him he contributed to the support of the children but $40, as near as I can estimate, and nothing for my support.”  Thompson “Talented.”  When she had to move out of the house in Loveland, she said she went to her father's home in the east.  She stated that her husband was “extremely talented,” but that their situation was due to his “bad man element” and to his “selfishness.”  In substantiating her charges of cruelty she related a number of instances.  She was ill at one time, she said, at his parents home in Michigan, when a pet cat of her husband's jumped up on her bed and she knocked it off.  He struck her, she said.  Another time he became angry with her when she wanted to pay the rent with some money he had received and he insisted on buying a gun with it.  On another occasion he told her to stop singing when she was singing the baby to sleep, she said, because he didn't like her singing, and he jerked her out of her chair and slapped her when she refused.  She went to a neighbor's then, she said.  On another occasion when he was angry he kicked the arm of the davenport to express his displeasure.  Gets $1,000: Spends $3,000.  At one time, she said, when their daughter was just past four years of age, she fell on the street in Loveland and he kicked her for falling, so that she felt it for several days.  Mr. Watts, Mrs. Thompson's father, in his testimony, which also was presented to the court, stated that in Loveland, Thompson was getting a salary of $1,000 a year and that he was living at a rate of about $3,000 a year.  He spent most of his money on an automobile he has, said Mr. Watts, and ran bills at the stores.  It has been reported that Thompson is improving steadily at the asylum at Pueblo and that he may be brought back to Fort Collins in the near future for trial on the charge of attempted blackmail.  It was while in the county jail here that he fell or threw himself out of his bunk to the concrete floor, the blow on his head rendering him unconscious for a time.  When he recovered it was only gradually and slowly, and after a long time in his bed at the jail during which time he spoke almost not at all and was clearly deranged, he was sent to Pueblo.  It was never fully determined whether the fall was the result of some fit that seized him or whether it was the cause of his condition.  No injuries could be discovered by the physicians.  Thompson, after his arrest, told the story of how he attempted to obtain $10,000 from Mr. Evans, wealthy local banker and rancher, by writing threatening letters to him by telephone to take it up the alley back of his home in an automobile, driving slowly, and deliver it to the person who would meet him.  The sheriff's office had been notified and laid a trap for the plotter, from which he escaped, but he was arrested the following day on circumstantial evidence. 

Thompson, David R.
patient race W gender M month born September year born 1874 age 25 marital status S place of birth Illinois occupation ballplayer source : 1900 census

Thompson, David R.
patient race W gender M age 35 marital status S place of birth Illinois occupation ball player source 1910 census

Thompson, David R.
patient race: W sex: M age: 44 marital:S place of birth: Illinois occupation: dish washer source: 1920 census

Thompson, David R.
Rocky Mountain News 7-31-1896 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Steele – People vs. T. F. Murphy and D. R. Thompson, alleged insane; ordered committed to county hospital.

Thompson, David R.
Rocky Mountain News 7-31-1896 – Civil Briefs – T. F. Murphy and D. R. Thompson, alleged insane, were ordered committed to the county hospital yesterday by Judge Steele.

Thompson, David R.
Denver Evening Post 8-7-1896 – Eight Insane Cases – Judge Steele's Docket for the Day – Spectators in the county court this morning witnessed a most pathetic scene. Eight insane cases were on the docket for trial… The other cases will be tried this afternoon, nearly all of them are insane over religion. They are Gusta Shauly, Theresa Miller, Hannah Olson, O. R. Thompson, Alice Farrell, Samuel Haesslip and Kate Godfrey.

Thompson, David R.
Denver Evening Post 8-8-1896 – Sent to the Asylum – In the county court yesterday afternoon Rosa Woaudflur, Alice Farrell, David R. Thompson and Mrs. Augusta Shanley were found insane and ordered committed to the Pueblo asylum.

Thompson, David R.
Rocky Mountain News 8-8-1896 – Séance With the Insane – County Court Occupied With the Examination of Men and Women With Wheels – About a dozen feeble minded inmates of the county hospital were taken to the county court yesterday for trial as to their sanity… The baseball crank was the next examined. He is David R. Thompson, 28 years of age. He seemed perfectly rational, but there was much evidence to show that at times he became violent. Dr. Pershing testified that Thompson was generally in a state corresponding to mild intoxication. He was jolly and hilarious and given to immoderate laughter at frequent intervals. A brother of Thompson testified that about two weeks ago David while reading an item on baseball, rolled back in his chair with laughter; also that on several occasions he threw his arms about people passing in the street. Ten days ago Thompson was taken to the hospital in the police ambulance and at that time he was exceedingly violent. In his own behalf Thompson testified that he was a base ball player and was deeply interested in base ball. He said that he drank “three or four beers” the night he was taken to the hospital and that the drinking probably caused his hilarity. Two weeks ago Thompson appeared near the court house and created general consternation by kissing every woman he met. After deliberations lasting over an hour the jury returned a verdict to the effect that Thompson was a lunatic.

Thompson, Earl M.
patient race: W sex: M age: 28 marital:S place of birth: Nebraska occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thompson, Ella
patient gender F race W age 57 marital status M birthplace Iowa source 1930 census

Thompson, Frank
patient race B gender M month born November year born 1854 age 45 marital status M place of birth Alabama occupation laborer source : 1900 census

Thompson, Frank
patient race W gender M age 28 marital status . place of birth . source 1910 census

Thompson, Frank
Yuma Pioneer 5-6-1910 – Proceedings of the Board of County Commissioners of Yuma County – Wray, Colo., April 28, 1910 – The board of county commissioners met in the office of the county clerk… The following claims were audited and allowed out of the general county funds and appropriated to the various sub funds as listed: Out of Court Fund – T. C. Jennings, County Court Costs Case People vs Frank Thompson, insane, $16.30; L. W. Wright, Juror, Case people vs. Frank Thompson, insane, $2.65; H. Lepper, same, $2.65; J. I. Smith, same, $2.65; G. H. Weaver, same, $2.65; D. B. McGinnis, same, $2.65; James Drummond, same, $2.65; Dr. E. J. Bales, witness same case, $5.15; Dr. J. L. Miller, same, $9.20; T. J. Tuttle, same, $6.70; M. M. Bubjelev, special prosecuting attorney same case, $10.00; Louis Henke, attorney guardian ad Litem same case, $10.00… B. E. Devling, Sheriff case people vs. Frank Thompson, insane, $160.55…

Thompson, Frank B.
patient race: B sex: M age: 64 marital:M place of birth: United States occupation: dish washer source: 1920 census

Thompson, Fred
patient gender M race W age 22 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Thompson, Guy
Durango Democrat 1-8-1908 – Yesterday Sheriff Clarke left for Pueblo with Guy Thompson adjudged insane.

Thompson, Guy
patient race: W sex: M age: 35 marital: S place of birth: Utahnone source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Thompson, Guy
patient race: W sex: M age: 46 marital:S place of birth: New Mexico occupation: farm helper source: 1920 census

Thompson, Harold
patient race: W sex: M age: 20 marital:S place of birth: Colorado occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thompson, Harold
patient gender M race W age 31 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Thompson, Harold
admitted 2-27-1914 from Las Animas, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Thompson, Helen J.
patient race W gender F month born . year born 1845 age 55 marital status W place of birth Missouri occupation housekeeper source : 1900 census

Thompson, Helen J.
patient race W gender F age 64 marital status W place of birth Missouri source 1910 census

Thompson, Helen J.
patient gender F race W age 84 marital status Wd birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Thompson, Helen J.
patient race: W sex: F age: 74 marital:W place of birth: Missouri occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thompson, Henry
Ouray Herald 6-23-1898 – Hospital Notes – Henry Thompson, colored, is getting worse. He is insane and thinks he ought to have a new head and also that he has lost his clothes.

Thompson, Henry
Ouray Herald 6-23-1898 – Henry Thompson, colored, was tried last night on the charge of lunacy and was adjudged insane by a jury of his peers. Until word can be had from Pueblo it is not known where he will be sent.

Thompson, Henry
Ouray Herald 6-30-1898 – Local News – Sheriff Edgar this morning took the demented colored man, Henry Thompson to the insane asylum.

Thompson, Henry
Ouray Herald 7-21-1898 – Local News – A short time ago a colored man named Henry Thompson was adjudged insane and sent to Pueblo, where he recently died. He had no relatives here and was by trade a cook.

Thompson, Henry
6-24-1898 Silverite-Plaindealer The colored man, Henry Thompson, was found to be insane in the county court last night and will be taken to Pueblo as soon as there is room for him in the asylum.

Thompson, James N
admitted 12-10-1914 from Weld, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Thompson, Janet R.
patient race: W sex: F age: 50 marital:S place of birth: England occupation: ward help source: 1920 census

Thompson, Mark L.
Leadville Herald Democrat 12-12-1891 – Another Unfortunate – Deputy Sheriff Tom Horrigan yesterday arrested Mark L. Thompson, for being insane, and placed him in the county jail. Thompson recently has been successful in mining, and made considerable money, which he wishes to dispose of to a number of people, by giving them powers of attorney to draw the money form the banks. He is not dangerously insane, and his friends expect that with a change of altitude he will recover his proper senses.

Thompson, Mary
pupil race: W sex: F age: 20 marital: S place of birth: Colorado source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Thompson, Mary
patient race: W sex: F age: 33 marital:S place of birth: United States occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thompson, Mary
Rocky Mountain News 12-26-1884 – Mary Thompson, an insane woman, was arrested yesterday by Officer Pass and placed in jail for safe keeping.

Thompson, Mollie
patient race W gender F month born . year born 1856 age 44 marital status S place of birth Illinois occupation domestic source : 1900 census

Thompson, Mollie
patient race W gender F age 53 marital status S place of birth Illinois occupation domestic source 1910 census

Thompson, Mollie
patient race: W sex: F age: 63 marital:S place of birth: Illinois occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thompson, Mollie
Denver Evening Post 7-17-1897 – Insane – A Quartet of Lunatics to Go to Pueblo Today – Sad Cases, All of Them – Four unfortunates were tried and convicted of being insane by jury in the county court this morning… The case of Mollie Thompson, an intelligent-looking young woman of 26, was a particularly sad one. Relatives testified that her dementia was caused by grief over the death of her mother. Miss Thompson is violent at times, and is considered by the doctors to be a very dangerous lunatic. She imagines that she is under the spell of a black witch day and night. The woman, it is said, has enjoyed little or no sleep in a month past… All four were adjudged insane and unfit to be at large. They were ordered sent to Pueblo.

Thompson, Mollie
Rocky Mountain News 7-17-1897 – Investigating Insane Cases – Judge Steele will hear in the county court this morning the charges of insanity brought against Mollie Thompson, Alexander Young and Edith M. Jackson.

Thompson, Mollie
Rocky Mountain News 7-18-1897 – Pursued By Church People – … Edith Jackson, Alamanda Young and Mollie Thompson were tried before juries and declared insane. They were taken to the county hospital and will later be transferred to the asylum.

Thompson, Mrs.
Routt County Republican 10-2-1914 – Colorado State News – Mrs. Thompson, an insane woman who has been living with E. B. Case, of Loveland, made an attempt to commit suicide, and was then taken in charge by the authorities.

Thompson, Otto
9-3-1896 Chaffee County Republican - Otto Thompson, a half-demented man who has been wandering over town for some time was examined in the county court yesterday as to his sanity. The jury quickly decided that the proper place for him was in the asylum.

Thompson, Rolin
Boulder County Herald Weekly 5-20-1885 – Rolen Thompson was taken to Pueblo Asylum by Frank Metcalf. Source “Boulder County, Colorado, Deaths and the Insane, 1859 – 1900,” by Mary McRoberts.

Thompson, Rolin
patient, white, male, age 60, single, Ohio, 1885 census

Thompson, Rolin
Rocky Mountain News 5-15-1885 – Northern Notes – Boulder – Rolin Thompson was adjudged insane in the County court, and was taken to the insane asylum at Pueblo Tuesday by deputy Sheriff Frank Metcalf. He is the fourth crazy man sent to that institution from Boulder this year.

Thompson, Susan
patient race W gender F month born . year born 1855 age 45 marital status M place of birth Maryland occupation housekeeper source : 1900 census

Thompson, Susan
patient race W gender F age 55 marital status M place of birth Maryland source 1910 census

Thompson, Susan
patient race: W sex: F age: 65 marital:M place of birth: Maryland occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thompson, Thomas
Eagle County Times 7-13-1901 – Thomas Thompson, a well-known resident of Gold Hill in Boulder county, recently became insane and was taken to the asylum at Pueblo.

Thompson, William
patient race W gender M age 33 marital status . place of birth Colorado occupation laborer source 1910 census

Thompson, William
patient race: W sex: M age: 43 marital:. place of birth: United States occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thomson, M.
patient, white, female, age 40, single, Ohio, 1885 census

Thomson, Susan
patient, white, female, age 32, married, Germany , 1885 census

Thornberg, Florence
patient gender F race W age 64 marital status M birthplace Ohio source 1930 census

Thornberg, Florence
patient race: W sex: F age: 44 marital: M place of birth: Ohionone source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Thornberg, Florence
patient race: W sex: F age: 54 marital:M place of birth: Ohio occupation: ward help source: 1920 census

Thornburg, Florence
Fort Collins Weekly Courier 10-7-1903 - The county commissioners have made application to have May Thornburg, the 18 months old daughter of Mrs. Florence Thornburg, who has been sent to an insane asylum at Pueblo, committed to the state home for dependent and neglected children.  Sheriff Cross left on Saturday for Pueblo with Mrs. Thornburg, who will be committed to Dr. Hubert Work's “Woodcroft” asylum for demented people.  The sheriff also took Blanche Mulnix, an incorrigible girl, to friends at Louisville Junction who have agreed to take care of her.  Mrs. Annie Jones accompanied the sheriff as an assistant.

Thornburg, Mrs.
Fort Collins Weekly Courier10-7-1903 – Sheriff Cross left on Saturday for Pueblo with Mrs. Thornburg, who will be committed to Dr. Hubert Work's “Woodcroft” asylum for demented people. The sheriff also took Blanche Mulnix, an incorrigible girl, to friends at Louisville Junction who have agreed to care of her. Mrs. Annie Jones accompanied the sheriff as an assistant.

Thorny, Theresa
Colorado Transcript 2-22-1912 Theresa Thorny, of Arvada, was adjudged insane and committed to the asylum.

Thorp, Amanda
patient race: W sex: F age: 60 marital:M place of birth: England occupation: dish washer source: 1920 census

Thorp, W. W.
Leadville Daily Herald 6-15-1882 – Peculiar Cases – Three Men Examined in the County Court to Test Their Sanity – Yesterday afternoon the attention of the county court was occupied in the examination of three men who, from their peculiar actions have attracted the attention of the authorities. They have been detained in the county jail for several days past, said to be insane. The names of these unfortunates are W. W. Thorp, Paul Stable and J. A. Diamond… Next came Thorp and the jury had a little closer examination to make to ascertain his true mental condition. He was finally adjudged temporarily insane and ordered to the county poor house for the present, in the hope that by good care and faithful watching he would recover.

Thorp, W. W.
Leadville Daily Herald 6-15-1882 – County Court – Judge Gunnell made the following orders yesterday: W. W. Thorp, Paul Stable and J. A. Diamond occupied the attention of the court during the afternoon. Paul Stable was adjudged insane, Thorp was sent to the poor house and Diamond was declared sane and released.

Thorpe, Edward
Record Journal of Douglas County 6-18-1909 - Edward Thorpe was adjudged insane in Judge Bassell's court on Saturday last and was taken to the asylum at Pueblo on Sunday. 

Thorpe, Edward
patient race W gender M age 46 marital status S place of birth California occupation farmer source 1910 census

Thorpe, George
Silverton Standard 2-18-1899 – George Thorpe Dead – George Thorpe is dead – states the San Juan, Del Norte Prospector, died in an eastern insane asylum, and leaves a wife and several children who are in Honolulu.  As is well known to the major part of this community, George was engaged in the drug business in this city for several years.  Ultimately the Durango boom, subsequent to the great fire in that city, came and Mr. Thorpe closed out his business here and re-established in Durango, in which venture we believe he was successful.  Two years ago his mind became shattered and he was taken back to Iowa, his native state.  Among the business men of San Juan and La Plata counties, Mr. Thorpe possessed many warm friends.

Thorpe, George L.
Telluride Journal 2-18-1899 – Another Pioneer Is Dead – The San Juan Prospector at Del Norte announces the death of George L. Thorpe in an eastern insane asylum, and states that his wife and children are in Honolulu. It will be remembered that George Thorp was engaged in the drug business years ago at Silverton and later in Durango. In the fall of '97 he became demented in Durango, and his brother came out and took him to Iowa. During August of that year he was frightened in an electrical storm while walking from his residence to the drug store, and his friends think this fright had the effect of collapsing his already disturbed mind. – Durango Herald.

Thorpe, John D.
patient gender M race W age 71 marital status Wd birthplace Pennsylvania source 1930 census

Thorpy, Michael
Greeley Tribune 4-12-1900 – Michael Thorpy, who had once been to the insane asylum, was judged insane again in Judge Jacobs court and was given over to the care of his sisters who will see that he is taken to Iowa where friends will care for him. [see Michael Turpey]

Thrower, Frederick
patient gender M race W age 44 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Thrower, Frederick
patient race: W sex: M age: 34 marital:S place of birth: Colorado occupation: none source: 1920 census

Thrower, Frederick
patient race: W sex: M age: 23 marital: S place of birth: Kansas none source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Thurston, Daniel D.
Eagle Valley Enterprise 8-6-1920 – Daniel D. Thurston, an employe of the state hospital for insane, was arrested by Special Investigator James W. Melrose of the United States department of justice and City Detectives Brady and McDonald, and is being held in jail at Pueblo, charged with violating the Mann act.  Thurston's wife is also being held.

Thyrett, Eva
patient gender F race W age 46 marital status M birthplace Iowa source 1930 census

Tibbets, William F.
Denver Evening Post 5-9-1895 – Lost His Mind – Captain Tibbets, the Railroad Man, Becomes Insane – In the county court this morning a complaint was sworn to against Captain William L. Tibbets charging him with insanity. The court made an order for his confinement in the county hospital pending a trial and committal to an asylum. Captain Tibbets has been traveling passenger agent for the Denver & Rio Grande railroad for several years and is one of the best known of Denver railroad men. For several months he has shown signs of losing his mind but he did not become so violent as to necessitate confinement until yesterday. He went to the Antlers hotel in Colorado Springs and became violent over the statements that he continually made of owning mines worth $3,000,000 or $4,000,000. He has lately been in the habit of traveling about Colorado towns on the Denver & Rio Grande and acting in an insane manner, annoying the hotel guests where he was stopping and giving all sorts of instructions to the clerks in the railroad offices. About a month ago he made a will which proved beyond a doubt that his mind was unsettled. Captain Tibbets has been in the employ of the Denver & Rio Grande for 17 years and is high in the Masonic order.

Tibbets, William F.
Rocky Mountain News 5-10-1895 – Local Brevities – A complaint for lunacy has been made in the county court against Captain W. F. Tibbets, who is well known in this city.

Tibbets, William F.
Denver Evening Post 7-2-1895 – Unfortunate Captain Tibbets – Captain W. F. Tibbetts, the aged ex-traveling agent of the Denver & Rio Grande Railway company, who recently became insane, late yesterday afternoon walked into the drug store at Fairview avenue and Goss street, North Denver, and proceeded to take possession thereof. The patrol wagon was called and Sergeant McNeill took the unfortunate railroad man to the hospital ward of the city jail.

Tibbets, William F.
Rocky Mountain News 7-26-1895 – Unfortunate Insane – Long List of the Afflicted Set for Trial – The following list of unfortunates will be tried during August in order to determine whether they are sane or not: W. F. Tibbets… W. F. Tibbets was known as “Captain,” and for many years was connected with the Rio Grande railroad. He is one of the best railroad men in the state.

Tibbets, William F.
Denver Evening Post 8-1-1895 – Their Strange Illusions – Insane Patients are Tried in the County Court To-Day – Several insane cases were tried in the county court to-day… This afternoon Captain Tibbits will be tried as to his sanity.

Tibbets, William F.
Rocky Mountain News 8-1-1895 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Steele – Call for to-day: People vs. W. F. Tibbets; lunacy.

Tibbets, William F.
Rocky Mountain News 8-2-1895 – Insane Vagaries – Lunacy Cases in the County Court with the Usual Result – A number of lunacy cases were tried in the county court yesterday and a verdict of guilty returned in every instance… Captain W. F. Tibbets, the aged railroad man, was the last one tried. He greeted Judge Steel warmly and frequently interrupted the proceedings with loud outbursts. He was so plainly insane that the jury were out only a few moments. All the unfortunates will be sent to the Pueblo asylum as soon as room can be made for them.

Tibbets, William F.
Denver Evening Post 1-4-1896 – His Career Ended – Captain Tibbitts Dies in the State Insane Asylum – He Was One of the Oldest Railroad Men in the Country and Was Well Known in This City – Some Months Ago He Lost His Health and Decline Then Began – Pueblo, Colo., Jan. 4 – Captain J. H. Tibbitts, formerly general traveling passenger agent for the Denver & Rio Grande and one of the pioneer railroading men of the West, died in the state insane asylum here last night. The death of the pioneer traveling passenger agent was received at the city railroad offices this morning with a sincere regret. His death failed to cause surprise, as those who were acquainted with the captain's last days premised that the end of an active life was nearing its close. In talking of the captain when he was a genial fixture to the city ticket office of the Denver & Rio Grande, Mr. Firth of the Rock Island said this morning: “The only epitaph you can write for the captain is that he was a good old boy in the true sense of the word. He was one of the pioneer traveling men, and many a hearty laugh we had with Tibbitts in the olden days. I regret sincerely his end. One of the lights of Western railroading goes out!” The captain's life was checkered and full of incident. At the time of his death he was 67 years old, gray haired and patriarchal in appearance. He was born in Michigan when it was as wild as Colorado. He was the son of one of the pioneers. His early life was passed in the region of the great lakes, and after grammar and geography had been thrown aside, the steamers plying up and down the St. Lawrence and the immense sheets of inland water acted as a powerful inducement to the adventurous youth, and while still a young man he took his place by the wheel box, becoming in time a lake captain, from whence he acquired his title. He followed the lakes until the early fifties, when he entered a railroad office and steadily worked his way to the top. At the time he joined the D. & R. G. thirteen years ago, he smilingly boasted that he was the oldest railroad man in the country, and strange to say, his claim was never disputed. He was a pioneer of Colorado, and could tell many tales of the rough early days. Every one of prominence knew the captain, and it would be safe to say his name was a by-word in many homes. His circle of acquaintances was a surprise, so large was it, and by his uniformly courteous and urbane manner he held an acquaintance as a life-long friend. He was a Mason of high degree, and has held many prominent offices. But in September last his strange actions when traveling from place to place in the line of his duty began to attract attention. Alternately fierce and gentle, he seemed no longer master of his mind. Valuable papers and memoranda would be frequently forgotten and left in the train. Correspondence accumulated on his desk, and a careless air pervaded the atmosphere around the aged traveling passenger agent. The officials of the road held an investigation, the outcome of which was a surprise to hundreds of the Captain's friends. He was said to be insane. Taken to the county hospital he became violent, and a few days later Judge Steele of the county court adjudged him insane, and he was conveyed to the state insane asylum at Pueblo, where he remained until his death. According to a message received from the asylum at Pueblo the physicians pronounced Captain Tibbitts' death to have been due to cerebral apoplexy. For the past two days he was unconscious most of the time, so that his end was peaceful. The hospital attendants were alone present at his bedside. Two days before his death he had been visited by his niece, who at that time realized that the end was not far off, and could be expected at any moment. As the lids fluttered in death and the rigid form grew cold there passed the soul of a generous, loving nature, with faults, it is true, but faults of the head rather than the heart. The death of old Captain Tibbitts will be deplored by everyone who knew him in his joyous life.

Tibbets, William F.
Rocky Mountain News 1-5-1896 – W. F. Tibbits Dead – The End Came in the Pueblo Insane Asylum – The death of Captain W. F. Tibbits, for many years general traveling passenger agent of the Denver and Rio Grande road, was announced from the Pueblo insane asylum yesterday. The venerable pioneer in railroading had passed his sixty-seventh milestone before the reaper called him away. Several months ago he was placed in the asylum, his mind having shown evidences of decay and at times his disease taking a dangerous form. The announcement last September that Captain Tibbits had been consigned to the insane asylum was a shock to a large circle of friends and acquaintances whom the genial passenger agent had gained during an experience of thirteen years on the Rio Grande road. Captain Tibbits was one of the oldest railroad men in the United States and ranked with Colonel May of the Pennsylvania line as a veteran in the service. He was born in Michigan and passed his early manhood upon the lakes, rising to the position of captain before he decided to abandon the dangerous life for a place in the passenger service of one of the Eastern lines. He rose through the different grades in the passenger department and early in the '80s came to Colorado to accept a position with the Denver and Rio Grande. He traveled extensively over the West and by his kindly manners and obliging disposition won the esteem of a great circle of acquaintances.

Tibbets, William F.
William F. Tibbets – Denver Evening Post – January 4, 1896 – His Career Ended – Captain Tibbitts Dies in the State Insane Asylum – He Was One of the Oldest Railroad Men in the Country and Was Well Known in This City – Some Months Ago He Lost His Health and Decline Then Began – Pueblo, Colo., Jan. 4 – Captain J. H. Tibbitts, formerly general traveling passenger agent for the Denver & Rio Grande and one of the pioneer railroading men of the West, died in the state insane asylum here last night. The death of the pioneer traveling passenger agent was received at the city railroad offices this morning with a sincere regret. His death failed to cause surprise, as those who were acquainted with the captain's last days premised that the end of an active life was nearing its close. In talking of the captain when he was a genial fixture to the city ticket office of the Denver & Rio Grande, Mr. Firth of the Rock Island said this morning: “The only epitaph you can write for the captain is that he was a good old boy in the true sense of the word. He was one of the pioneer traveling men, and many a hearty laugh we had with Tibbitts in the olden days. I regret sincerely his end. One of the lights of Western railroading goes out!” The captain's life was checkered and full of incident. At the time of his death he was 67 years old, gray haired and patriarchal in appearance. He was born in Michigan when it was as wild as Colorado. He was the son of one of the pioneers. His early life was passed in the region of the great lakes, and after grammar and geography had been thrown aside, the steamers plying up and down the St. Lawrence and the immense sheets of inland water acted as a powerful inducement to the adventurous youth, and while still a young man he took his place by the wheel box, becoming in time a lake captain, from whence he acquired his title. He followed the lakes until the early fifties, when he entered a railroad office and steadily worked his way to the top. At the time he joined the D. & R. G. thirteen years ago, he smilingly boasted that he was the oldest railroad man in the country, and strange to say, his claim was never disputed. He was a pioneer of Colorado, and could tell many tales of the rough early days. Every one of prominence knew the captain, and it would be safe to say his name was a by-word in many homes. His circle of acquaintances was a surprise, so large was it, and by his uniformly courteous and urbane manner he held an acquaintance as a life-long friend. He was a Mason of high degree, and has held many prominent offices. But in September last his strange actions when traveling from place to place in the line of his duty began to attract attention. Alternately fierce and gentle, he seemed no longer master of his mind. Valuable papers and memoranda would be frequently forgotten and left in the train. Correspondence accumulated on his desk, and a careless air pervaded the atmosphere around the aged traveling passenger agent. The officials of the road held an investigation, the outcome of which was a surprise to hundreds of the Captain's friends. He was said to be insane. Taken to the county hospital he became violent, and a few days later Judge Steele of the county court adjudged him insane, and he was conveyed to the state insane asylum at Pueblo, where he remained until his death. According to a message received from the asylum at Pueblo the physicians pronounced Captain Tibbitts' death to have been due to cerebral apoplexy. For the past two days he was unconscious most of the time, so that his end was peaceful. The hospital attendants were alone present at his bedside. Two days before his death he had been visited by his niece, who at that time realized that the end was not far off, and could be expected at any moment. As the lids fluttered in death and the rigid form grew cold there passed the soul of a generous, loving nature, with faults, it is true, but faults of the head rather than the heart. The death of old Captain Tibbitts will be deplored by everyone who knew him in his joyous life. Rocky Mountain News 1-5-1896 – W. F. Tibbits Dead – The End Came in the Pueblo Insane Asylum – The death of Captain W. F. Tibbits, for many years general traveling passenger agent of the Denver and Rio Grande road, was announced from the Pueblo insane asylum yesterday. The venerable pioneer in railroading had passed his sixty-seventh milestone before the reaper called him away. Several months ago he was placed in the asylum, his mind having shown evidences of decay and at times his disease taking a dangerous form. The announcement last September that Captain Tibbits had been consigned to the insane asylum was a shock to a large circle of friends and acquaintances whom the genial passenger agent had gained during an experience of thirteen years on the Rio Grande road. Captain Tibbits was one of the oldest railroad men in the United States and ranked with Colonel May of the Pennsylvania line as a veteran in the service. He was born in Michigan and passed his early manhood upon the lakes, rising to the position of captain before he decided to abandon the dangerous life for a place in the passenger service of one of the Eastern lines. He rose through the different grades in the passenger department and early in the '80s came to Colorado to accept a position with the Denver and Rio Grande. He traveled extensively over the West and by his kindly manners and obliging disposition won the esteem of a great circle of acquaintances.

Tice, Ida M.
patient gender F race W age 46 marital status Wd birthplace Kentucky source 1930 census

Tiedenham, Fred
patient gender M race W age 39 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Tiedenham, Fred
patient race: W sex: M age: 29 marital:S place of birth: Colorado occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tiedtke, Herbert
patient gender M race W age 31 marital status Un birthplace Wisconsin source 1930 census

Tierney, Martin
patient race W gender M month born January year born 1862 age 38 marital status S place of birth New York occupation laborer source : 1900 census

Tierney, Martin
patient race W gender M age 47 marital status S place of birth New York occupation laborer source 1910 census

Tierney, T J
admitted 7-13-1899 from Denver, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Tierney, William M.
patient race W gender M age 67 marital status M place of birth Ireland occupation merchant source 1910 census

Tierney, William M.
patient race W gender M month born January year born 1842 age 58 marital status M place of birth Ireland occupation merchant source : 1900 census

Tighe, James
patient gender M race W age 63 marital status Un birthplace Ireland source 1930 census

Tiglestrand, Annie
patient race W gender F age 11 marital status S place of birth Germany source 1910 census

Tilgnar, Oscar
patient race: W sex: M age: 48 marital:. place of birth: Colorado occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tilley, L. B.
patient gender M race W age 76 marital status Wd birthplace Kentucky source 1930 census

Tilley, L. B.
patient race: W sex: M age: 64 marital:W place of birth: Kentucky occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tilney, John
Boulder County Herald Weekly 2-5-1900 – John Tilney was taken to Pueblo Asylum by Sheriff Autrey. Source “Boulder County, Colorado, Deaths and the Insane, 1859 – 1900,” by Mary McRoberts.

Tinker, Deed
patient race: W sex: M age: 59 marital:M place of birth: Indiana occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tiogofius, Joseph
patient race: W sex: M age: 23 marital: S place of birth: Italynone source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Montezuma Journal 2-16-1911 – Found Insane – A man who gave his name as Abraham Lincoln Tipton was taken into custody here this week on the charge of insanity.  He has been here for a month or more, crippled up with a frozen foot, and came to this place from the oil country.  He appeared all right, paid his board bills promptly and evidenced no signs of being demented until the last four or five days, when the signs became fully apparent.  He was not vicious, but clearly unbalanced mentally, and possessed of strange hallucinations.  Sheriff Gawith was telephoned at once and came up Wednesday and yesterday took the afflicted man to Cortez for safe keeping.  He will in all probability be sent to the asylum at Pueblo.  – Mancos Times.  – Tipton was tried in Judge Morefield's court Monday morning, found insane and sentenced to the asylum.  His affliction is such that it is believed a few weeks treatment there will prove highly beneficial and perhaps effect a permanent cure.  He has been an inmate of the Work sanatorium on one other occasion. S. W. Carpenter conducted the case for the county while H. M. Hogg appeared for Tipton.  Sheriff Gawith took the unfortunate man to the asylum Wednesday.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Montezuma Journal 2-23-1911 - Sheriff Gawith returned Saturday evening from Pueblo where he had taken Al Tipton to the insane asylum.  He reports that practically the first rains or snows of the winter are now on in that part of the state.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Telluride Journal 10-29-1908 – Abe Tipton, the man charged with threatening the life of Lee Bennett, had his trial by jury before County Judge Brown yesterday afternoon to determine his sanity. The jury, after being out nearly two hours, found Tipton to be demented, but whether or not he is temporarily deranged or really insane, there seems to be some doubt, and after a short confinement here awaiting development, his case will be disposed of.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Telluride Journal 4-15-1909 County Judge Brown received word this morning from the superintendent of the Pueblo Insane Asylum that Abraham Tipton, of Norwood, who was adjudged insane here last November, had fully recovered his mind. Papers will be issued at once for Tipton's discharge from the Asylum.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Telluride Journal 12-10-1908 P. R. Steele, the popular clerk at the store of Galloway Bros., recently received a written message from Undersheriff Krudston, saying that Abe Tipton was removed from the county jail to the Pueblo insane asylum on the 25th of November, and that the personal property of the insane man at this place would be disposed of in a legal way later on.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Telluride Journal 2-23-1911 Telluride Man Insane - A. L. Tipton has been adjudged insane at Cortez and remanded to the state insane asylum. It was stated at the medical investigation that Tipton was a former Telluride resident, who had some years ago been declared insane in this city.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Telluride Daily Journal 11-14-1908 – Abe Tipton, it is reported, has been transferred from the county jail at Telluride to the state insane asylum at Pueblo, having made it clear to the county officials that he is a dangerous lunatic.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Telluride Daily Journal 11-25-1908 – Sheriff Fitzpatrick went out to Pueblo this morning, accompanied by Abraham Tipton, the Norwood round-up cook who was adjudged insane in the county court some weeks ago.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Telluride Daily Journal 11-28-1908 – Sheriff Fitzpatrick returned last night from Pueblo, where he placed A. Tipton in the insane asylum.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Telluride Daily Journal 12-5-1908 – P. R. Steele, the popular clerk at the store of Galloway Bros., recently received a written message from Undersheriff Krudston, saying that Abe Tipton was removed from the county jail to Pueblo insane asylum on the 25th of November, and that the personal property of the insane man at this place would be disposed of in a legal way later on.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Telluride Daily Journal 6-25-1909 – A letter from Zurich, Kan., received by C. H. Morgan, bore the signature of A. T. Tipton, who, it will be remembered, was taken to Telluride early last fall and there adjudged insane and committed to the asylum.  The writer wanted information as to some personal effects he had been compelled to leave behind when forced to move out to the county seat.  From the tone of his letter he was not pleased with the state institution, and charged his removal to the place as the result of strong drink, and saying he had not drank any whiskey since he left Norwood and never would again.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
Mancos Times-Tribune 2-17-1911 – Marshal D. S. Thomas went to Cortez Sunday as a witness against A. L. Tipton who was tried in the county court Monday and adjudged insane.  He will be placed in the care of the state asylum at Pueblo.

Tipton, Abraham Lincoln
patient race: W sex: M age: 57 marital:S place of birth: Illinois occupation: farm helper source: 1920 census

Tipton, Adeline E
admitted 7-17-1915 from Las Animas, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Tipton, Pearl
patient gender F race W age 40 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Titterington, Lloyd
Wray Rattler – 11-14-1918 Insane Lloyd Titterington of Yuma, who recently went to Pennsylvania to enter training camp for the Tank Corp of the United States Army, was brought home last Thursday by two soldiers from the camp, he having gone violently insane at the camp. Mr. Titterington was given a hearing before the County Court Friday and was sent to Pueblo, where later he died. It was necessary while bringing the young man home and while having his hearing, to keep him strapped and manacled to a cot.

Tobin, Tom
admitted 4-8-1901 from Las Animas, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Tobyne, Seth E.
patient gender M race W age 68 marital status M birthplace Illinois source 1930 census

Todd, Paul
patient gender M race W age 24 marital status S birthplace Kansas source 1930 census

Todd, Thomas
patient gender M race W age 30 marital status S birthplace Oklahoma source 1930 census

Toit, Annie
patient race W gender F month born . year born 1851 age 49 marital status S place of birth France occupation servant source : 1900 census

Tokarski, Mary
patient gender F race W age 52 marital status Wd birthplace Poland source 1930 census

Tolles, Larkin C.
Rocky Mountain News 1-17-1895 – Adjudged Insane – Central City, Colo., Jan. 16 – Dr. Larkin C. Tolles, one of the oldest practitioners in this city, and a surgeon on the First regiment of Colorado volunteers, was adjudged insane in the county court last evening. His insanity is not of a violent character. He is a prominent Mason, which order has been looking after him for some length of time. He will be taken to some hospital in Denver and cared for.

Tolles, Larkin C.
Denver Evening Post 5-10-1895 – His Mind Impaired – Dr. Tolles of Central City Invades a Friend's House – Dr. L. C. Tolles of Central City was taken from the residence, 1516 Colfax avenue, to the police station yesterday afternoon for safe keeping. He is thought to be insane. The temporary prisoner is one of the best known men in Colorado. He has practiced medicine in Gilpin county for thirty years and previous to going to that part of the state resided in this city. Thirty-two years ago he located 160 acres of ground where the beautiful residences of Capitol hill now stand. He disposed of his property, which was not valuable then, for a mere song, to move to the gold mining region on the crest of the mountains. While Dr. Tolles is not violent his mind is weakened to such an extent that it was recently decided by Gilpin county authorities that he should be sent to the Pueblo asylum. He stated to the police officials, after arriving at the station, that the county court had found him insane at Central City last week. “Isn't that strange?” he continued. “I don't look like an insane man.” It seems as though the Gilpin authorities sent or took the unfortunate pioneer to Pueblo, but the surroundings did not suit him and he returned to Denver on his own responsibility. In explaining himself he said: “I wanted to see my family here and visit my friends about a month before going to the mad house.” He had accordingly called at the friend's residence, from which he was taken to headquarters. County Physician Clark decided to send Dr. Tolles back to Central City. The old gentleman is 69 years old, is over 6 feet tall, wears a long snowy white beard and dresses in the fashion popular a decade since.

Tolles, Larkin C.
Rocky Mountain News 5-10-1895 – Homesteaded the Hill – Dr. L. C. Tolles of Gilpin Alleged to Be Insane – Once Owned All Capitol Hill – The man who thirty-two years ago owned 160 acres of land where Capitol hill now stands was yesterday locked in the hospital ward at the city jail, his mind having become deranged. This individual is Dr. L. C. Tolles, who for the past thirty years has been a practicing physician in Gilpin county. The doctor is a pioneer among pioneers, and in the early days he was a hardy and faithful servant of the public as well as wealthy and influential. Time has worked a sad change upon the man, however, and to-day at the age of 69, he is feeble physically as well as mentally. Grows Incoherent – He is by no means violent, but simply suffers from lapses of memory and he rambles incoherently a greater part of the time. Occasionally, however, he regains his full mental vigor, and then appears to be fully aware of his condition. His personal appearance commands respect. He is over six feet in height and wears a long, snow white beard. He dresses neatly in the fashion of several years ago. According to his own statement he was adjudged insane at Central City last week and was ordered sent to Pueblo for examination. “Yes, sir, they found me insane,” he said. “Isn't it strange? I don't look like a maniac, do I?” It seems as though the Central authorities sent him to Pueblo alone. The doctor says that he went to Pueblo, but that he returned to Denver before going to the asylum. “I wanted to see my family here,” he said, “and visit my friends about a month before going to the mad house.” Friends Are Alarmed – Yesterday noon the doctor wandered to the home of a friend at 1516 Colfax avenue east. The friend was much alarmed at the visitor, knowing that he had been declared insane, and so hastily called the police. Dr. Tolles, greatly surprised at the arrival of the alfalfa policemen, who thought they had to deal with a husky maniac, had some difficulty convincing them that he would do them no violence. He was taken to jail in the patrol wagon much against his wishes. In the hospital ward he walked about uneasily, but expressed no ill-will toward his captors. County Physician Clark was called and decided to send Tolles back to Central City. Dr. Tolles is known to almost every person in Gilpin county. He practiced in Central City, Black Hawk, Silver Plume, Idaho Springs and Georgetown during the thirty years he spent in the county. In 1862-3 he was examining physician in the United States army. His wife and family live at 443 Clark street, this city.

Tomsic, Anna
patient gender F race W age 51 marital status M birthplace Austria source 1930 census

Tomsic, Anna
patient race: W sex: F age: 40 marital:M place of birth: Austria occupation: dish washer source: 1920 census

Tomson, Henry R.
patient gender M race W age 68 marital status M birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Tonelli, Paul
patient gender M race W age 50 marital status S birthplace Austria source 1930 census

Tony, William
patient race: W sex: M age: 54 marital:D place of birth: Illinois occupation: ward helper source: 1920 census

Toogood, Esther
patient, female, white, age 30, single, born Nebraska, 1930 Woodcroft census

Toole, Ethel
patient gender F race W age 36 marital status S birthplace Indiana source 1930 census

Toomey, Edward
Cripple Creek Morning Times 7-25-1899 - Sheriff Stewart left yesterday morning for Pueblo, for the purpose of placing Edward Toomey in the asylum for the insane.

Toomey, Edward
Cripple Creek Morning Times 7-22-1899 – Adjudged Insane – A jury in the county court adjudged Edward Toomey insane and he was sent to Pueblo.

Toomey, Edward
Cripple Creek Morning Times 7-23-1899 – Will Leave Monday – Sheriff Stewart will leave Monday morning for Pueblo, where he will take Edward Toomey to the asylum for the insane.

Tooney, Edward
patient race W gender M month born August year born 1854 age 45 marital status S place of birth Canada occupation laborer source : 1900 census

Topliff, Minerva C.
Rocky Mountain News 3-14-1895 – Disagreed as to Her Sanity – Boulder, Colo., March 13 – A very sad case was tried before Judge Alpheus Wright in the county court to-day. Mrs. Minerva C. Topliff, wife of Dr. Topliff, practicing physician at Longmont, is insane. She is a refined and handsome woman, 62 years old, of noble appearance and is lucid on every other subject. She claimed while on the stand to-day that she was directed in all her movements and actions by God; that the voice of Jesus Christ speaks to her and instructs her in all things, and that she must do what Jesus tells her. On Friday afternoon last she left for Denver because, she claimed, God told her while in a trance. Her case is a sad one. Drs. Ambrook, Dodge and Giffin are called to testify as experts in this case. The jury disagreed as to her sanity.

Topliff, Minerva C.
Rocky Mountain News 5-17-1895 – Dr. Topliff's Will – Boulder, Colo., May 16 – The will of Dr. Joseph J. Topliff of Longmont, who died Sunday, May 12, has been presented to County Judge Alpheus Wright for probate. The property will amount to about $10,000. Dr. Topliff left a wife who was adjudged insane four weeks ago and is now in the insane asylum at Pueblo, and three married daughters, Mrs. Maud Rocho, Mrs. Alice Williams and Mrs. Grace Wilson. The former resides at Greeley, Mrs. Williams and Mrs. Wilson reside in Longmont.

Topliff, Minerva C.
Denver Evening Post 3-16-1895 – Mrs. Dr. Totliff yesterday convicted of insanity at Longmont, is said to be rational on all subjects except spiritualism. How many persons are rational on that subject?

Topliff, Minerva C.
Boulder News 3-21-1895 – Mrs. Dr. J. J. Topliff, of Longmont, was declared insane and taken to Pueblo. Source “Boulder County, Colorado, Deaths and the Insane, 1859 – 1900,” by Mary McRoberts.

Torpey, Michael
admitted 1-20-1899 from Greely, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Torrence, Hugh
Steamboat Pilot 5-26-1909 – Hugh Torrence, for years one of the best known cattlemen in Routt county and also one of the wealthiest, died last week at the insane asylum in Pueblo, where he has been confined for several years.  The body was taken east for burial, accompanied by Boyd Walbridge, who has been conservator of the estate since Mr. Torrence has been incapable of attending to business.

Torrence, Hugh
Steamboat Pilot 7-5-1905 – Adjudged Insane – Yesterday forenoon (June 30, 1905), Hugh Torrence was examined as to his mental condition by Judge Shervin of the county court. The following named gentlemen composed the jury: W. J. Knapp, V. A. Dikeman, A. E. Rees, C. C. Childs, C. C. Schrontz and H. S. Howey. After listening to the testimony the jury brought in a verdict that Mr. Torrence was insane, as charged. The matter of the appointment of a guardian will be completed at a later day by the court. Mr. Torrence is known by everybody in this section. He has been a resident of the Bear river country for over twenty years. He has led an upright and very correct life and enjoyed the confidence and esteem of all. His many friends will be pained to learn that his mind was clouded at the last, just as he was in shape to enjoy life. – Meeker Review.

Torrence, Hugh
Yampa Leader 11-30-1907 – A recent examination by medical experts of Hugh Torrence, who is in the insane asylum at Pueblo, gives no hope of his recovery.

Torrence, Hugh
Routt County Sentinel 8-5-1921 – Sixteen Years Ago – Reminiscences recalled by the early files of The Routt County Sentinel. The news items that appeared for the corresponding week 16 years ago will be republished in this column each week. July 28, 1905 – Hugh Torrence, an Axial basin pioneer who had recently become insane, was in Steamboat for treatment. He was being cared for by Thomas Haggerty, a professional nurse from Colorado Springs.

Torrence, Hugh
Routt County Sentinel 5-28-1909 – Hugh Torrence Dies at Asylum – Hugh Torrence died at the state insane asylum at Pueblo on Friday, May 14. Representative Walbridge, conservator of the estate, left Meeker, Saturday, May 15, to attend to the burial and at the request of friends of the deceased took the remains to Galesburg, Illinois, for burial. Mr. Torrence was one of the old pioneers of Routt county and twice a candidate on the Republican ticket for this District for representative. He was considered the leading cattle man of Routt county until his infirmity about four years ago, when he became insane and was sent to the asylum for treatment and Representative L. Boyce Walbridge was appointed by the court as conservator of his person and estate. Mr. Walbridge has continued his cattle and agricultural interests at Axial, Colo., since his infirmity, at the request of the heirs of the lunatic, and at the date of his death takes charge of the remains and buries them at their request at Galesburg, the home of the deceased before his advent and residence in Routt county.

Torrence, Hugh
Hugh Torrence was buried in Galva Cemetery, Lynn Township, Knox/Henry County, Illinois.

Torrence, Hugh
Meeker Herald 5-22-1909 – Hugh Torrence – A telegram was received last Friday, by L. B. Walbridge, announcing the death of Hugh Torrence at the Work sanitarium, Pueblo. Mr. Walbridge, who has been conservator of the Torrence estate, accompanied the remains to Galesburg, Ill., where they were buried. All are familiar with the mental break down which came on Mr. Torrence a few years ago and the news of his demise was not unexpected. However, all old-timers in Rio Blanco and Routt counties will regret to hear of his passing away. He was a pioneer in northwestern Colorado; prominent in the business and political world; of the highest integrity and greatly esteemed by all who knew him. Meeker Herald 5-22-1909 – Mr. Hugh Torrence, the son of Hugh and Anna Torrence, was born near Connellsville, Pa., October 22, 1843. He was a cousin of the late General Joseph Torrence of Chicago, whose father James was an elder brother of Hugh Torrence, Sr. The boyhood days of Mr. Torrence were spent in Pennsylvania and Illinois. In 1867 he located in Johnson county, Mo., and in 1874 he became a resident of Colorado and a pioneer of Yampah river valley. He first lived near old Yampah, later at Lay, and in 1882 located at Axial, Colo., and formed a partnership in the cattle business with Mr. Charles J. Hulett. This partnership continued until the death of the latter in 1903, and was successful and agreeable, because of the business qualifications of the two men, their congenial natures, and their brotherly treatment and affection for each other. They were widely known among cattle raisers and dealers, on account of their ability in raising, buying and selling cattle. In an early day they purchased cattle in Utah, and in later years in Texas, New Mexico and Oregon. Mr. Torrence departed this life May 14, 1909. His body was taken by Hon. L. B. Waldbridge to Galva, Ill., where it was laid to rest by the grave of his father and mother. Besides hosts of friends who mourn his death, the deceased leaves the following relatives to whom he was dear: Sisters, Mrs. Eliza McGillard and Miss Emma Torrence of Fountain City, Ind.; niece, Miss Pearl Witteman, Blairstown, Mo.; nephews, Messrs. C. E. McGillard and Forest McGillard of Fountain City, Ind., G. E. Witteman of Chicago, and C. H. Wittman formerly of Ringsted, Iowa. Mr. Torrence was a believer in Christ, an attendant at church service, and a reader of the Bible. His spirit has gone to “God who gave it.” Let us not sorrow as those who have no hope, but let us look forward to meeting him in heaven, where “death shall be no more; neither shall there be mourning nor crying, nor pain any more.” The following words of Mr. Torrence, penned years ago, may be used as a message to every person who reads them: “It is only a matter of time with the best of us, and a short time at that. Let us live in accordance and prepare for a better world.” The relatives of Mr. Torrence desire to express their gratitude to Messrs. Hulett and Walbridge for their kindness and assistance in managing the affairs of the deceased during his long illness.

Torrence, Lamar
patient gender M race W age 27 marital status S birthplace Texas source 1930 census

Torres, Juan
patient gender M race Mex age 51 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Toslin, Mary J
admitted 6-13-1898 from Flagler, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Tossett, William
patient race W gender M age 49 marital status . place of birth Ohio occupation woodworker source 1910 census

Tost, Carl
patient gender M race W age 35 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Toth, Joe
Oak Creek Times 12-17-1921 – Joe Toth of Oak Creek was adjudged insane by the lunacy board last week and Sheriff Charles Neiman left with him on Friday's train for Pueblo.

Toth, Joe
Steamboat Pilot 12-14-1921 – Joe Toth of Oak Creek was yesterday adjudged insane by a medical commission in the county court and will be taken to the state hospital at Pueblo.

Toth, Joe
Steamboat Pilot 12-21-1921 – Oak Creek – Joe Toth of Oak Creek was adjudged insane by the lunacy board last week and Sheriff Charles Neiman left with him on Friday's train for Pueblo.

Toth, Joe
Routt County Sentinel 12-16-1921 – Taken to State Hospital – Sheriff C. W. Neiman left this morning for Pueblo, taking two patients, Mrs. Clark Lafon of Yampa and Joe Toth of Oak Creek, to the State hospital, as the result of a hearing by the Lunacy commission. Mr. Lafon accompanied his wife, as an attendant. Mrs. Lafon, who was formerly Miss Leona Souther, has been considered mentally unbalanced for some time, as has been the case with Mr. Toth, a native of Hungary who has been in the United States for 18 years, at least 10 of which have been spent at Oak Creek, where he owns several dwelling houses. His unfortunate condition is thought to have been caused by an accident which he sustained in a mine, a year or two ago.

Toth, Joe
Steamboat Pilot 9-1-1920 – Joe Troth (Toth), an employe of the Moffat mine, was taken to the Oak Creek hospital last week after he had been struck on the head by a falling rock and rendered unconscious. It is said that the accident occurred as he was placing a prop. At the hospital he developed symptoms of lunacy, and was later removed to his home. His condition has since been improving, although he is not yet rational.

Toth, Joe
Routt County Sentinel 9-3-1920 – Joe Toth, one of the best known miners of the Oak Creek district, last week developed signs of lunacy as the result of having been struck on the head by a fall of rock in the Moffat mine. He is thought to be improving.

Toth, Joseph
patient gender M race W age 65 marital status Wd birthplace Germany source 1930 census

Towers, George W.
Steamboat Pilot 5-21-1913 – Real Estate Transfers – Prepared for The Steamboat Pilot by The Zimmerman Abstract Co. – Quit Claim Deeds – Albert Norman, conservator of George W. Towers (insane) to the Government of the United States, SE ¼ NE ¼, NE ¼ SE ½, sec. 24; NE ¼ SW ¼, sec. 32, twp. 1 S., R. 84 W.; $1.

Town, Julia N.
Fort Collins Courier 9-10-1896 – St. Cloud – Two persons have been adjudged insane in the county court this week and committed to the asylum at Pueblo.  The first was the case of E. L. Graham of Stove Prairie, upon which an inquisition was held on Tuesday, and the second was that of Mrs. Julia N. Town who was tried on Wednesday.  The juries found them both insane and Judge Bailey committed them to the asylum.  Graham was taken to Pueblo on Wednesday and Mrs. Town will go at a later date.

Towne, Reuben B.
admitted 1-18-1898 from Gunnison, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Towne, Reuben B.
Telluride Daily Journal 1-24-1898 – R. B. (“Dad”) Towne, one of the earliest pioneers of the San Juan, has gone violently insane, and last week was committed to the state insane asylum at Pueblo, by the Gunnison county court.

Towne, Reuben B.
Telluride Daily Journal 1-25-1898 – “Dad” Towne Has Lost His Mind – A Pioneer of the San Juan Becomes Violently Insane and is Committed to the Asylum – From the Gunnison Tribune – Monday R. B. Towne, familiarly known as “Dad” Towne, was brought down from the mine on Taylor river being worked by Geo. H. Burrows, in a very sad condition, he having lost his mind entirely at times.  He was taken to the home of Mr. Burrows, but later the sheriff had to be called upon to take care of him.  Last Saturday morning he had a spasm in bed and the two men who were with him relieved him as best they could.  From that time he was rational only at short intervals and became violent.  He was brought before a jury in the county court Tuesday and adjudged insane.  Sheriff Wiley took him to Pueblo.  Dad Towne was well known throughout the mining camps of this state.  In company with another prospector he located the famous Yankee Boy mine at Ouray, the sale of which brought him quite a snug fortune.  The money passed lightly through his fingers and the only part left of it is a paid-up life insurance policy in the New York Mutual for $5,000 or $10,000.  He became associated with Burrows in Hinsdale and they jointly own a good claim at Carson.  He then came to Beaver and prospected there and at Iris a couple of years.  Mr. Burrows, noticing that his mind was weakening for the past three years, looked after him and last fall Dad was given the job of cook at the mine on Taylor river.  He has a married daughter living near Batavia, N. Y., who has been communicated with.

Towne, Reuben B.
Ouray Herald 2-24-1898 – It is said that it took eleven men to capture “Dad” Towne when he went insane over in Gunnison County. His was of a violent type, but he has his rational moments. During some of these he remembered a trunk full of clothes he had in Ouray, and they were shipped to him by Clarence Norton. He is at present confined in the Imbecile and Feeble-Minded asylum. Those of us who remember poor old “Dad” in his days of prosperity deeply deplore his sad end. His advanced years make it highly improbable that he will ever regain his reason.

Towne, Reuben B.
Ouray Herald 12-15-1905 – “Dad” Towne Dead – Reuben B. (“Dad”) Towne, one of the oldest residents of the county having resided here for 28 years, passed away at the hospital Saturday morning, death resulting from burns sustained by falling into a fire-place at his cabin near Portland, two weeks ago. He has been subject to periods of lunacy for several years, and it is supposed that it was during such a fit of mental incompetency that he lost control of himself and fell into the fire. It was thought, though terribly burned especially about the head, that he was in a fair way to recover, but his injuries proved too serious. He was 68 years old. When deceased came to Ouray he drove a wagon through from Kansas with a load of “grub” and it was at that time that he was given the nice name of “Dad” which he bore ever since. Practically all of his time has been devoted to mining and prospecting. In '75 he located the Yankee Boy group of mines at Sneffels, consisting of the Yankee Boy, Dutch Boy, York State and Genessee. He had as partners Emil Cherist and Mike Dermody. They sold the group for $80,000 of which sum “Dad” received $60,000. During the past six years, except for six months past, he has lived at the Day ranch near Portland, making the ranch headquarters and prospecting at intervals. He was a well known and familiar figure about Ouray. Years ago when Gus Begole conducted a grocery store he made that place his loafing (?) place when he was in Ouray. The remains were shipped Monday to Elba, N. Y. to his daughter Mrs. Chas. D. Harris. Deceased leaves a policy of $1,000 in the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co. which was paid up by him 42 years ago, and goes to his daughter.

Towne, Stewart
patient race W sex M month of birth . year of birth 1881 age 19 marital S place of birth Colorado source 1900 census

Towne, Stewart
admitted 9-26-1896 from Leadville, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Towne, Stewart
patient race W gender M age 28 marital status S place of birth Colorado source 1910 census

Towner, M. W.
Denver Evening Post 3-17-1896 – Alleged to Be Insane – An extra session of the county court will be held at 8 o'clock this evening for the trial of several persons alleged to be insane. The defendants will be John Hillard, Sanford Critchfield, Charles Anderson and M. W. Towner.

Towner, M. W.
Rocky Mountain News 3-18-1896 – Four Insanity Cases – Peculiar Phase of Disease Developed in Court – Four victims of unsound mind were adjudged insane before Judge Steele last evening. M. W. Towner thought he owned the First National bank and suffered from other similar delusions.

Towner, M. W.
Rocky Mountain News 3-18-1896 – Four Insanity Cases – Peculiar Phase of Disease Developed in Court – Four victims of unsound mind were adjudged insane before Judge Steele last evening. M. W. Towner thought he owned the First National bank and suffered from other similar delusions.

Townsend, Allen
patient gender M race W age 53 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Townsend, Allen
patient race: W sex: M age: 42 marital:S place of birth: Colorado occupation: farm helper source: 1920 census

Towser, Marcus
Boulder News and Courier 1-6-1882 – The Sheriff was ordered to place Marcus Towser in care of the Superintendent of the State Insane Asylum, he having been adjudged insane.

Toy, Lewee
Durango Democrat 2-5-1903 – Starts for Pueblo This Morning – “Big May, he in hevlin, he my wife?”  Thus answered Lewee Toy, a “nutty” Chinaman, who was tried in Judge Pike's court yesterday, as to his saneness.  Lewee took a shot at Charlie Shon last Sunday night, when the latter was trying to drive him to bed.  Up to a month ago Lewee “hit the pipe,” and then he became ill.  He had no appetite, couldn't sleep, talked day and night about a white woman, May Galleghar, who was known in Durango as “Big May.”  She left the town several months ago.  Lewee owns a fourth interest in the Horse Shoe Café and when he began to act so strangely his partners became afraid of him.  He would sit by the fire all night and Charlie Shon poured water on it to drive him to bed, but this only angered him and had not Charlie dodged from the range of Lewee's pistol he might now be in the happy land of pigtails.  Drs. Hurd, Marshal, Wickline, Jailor Smelcer and several Chinamen testified as to Lewee's capers and a jury adjudged him insane.  It was only when speaking of his wife, marriage and money that Lewee seemed to have bats in his belfry.  When Attorney Morgan asked him where his wife was, he would grin, show his teeth, squint his slant eyes and say: “Hevlin.”  He said he could talk to her, but couldn't see her.  If Jailor Smelcer wants to keep Lewee in a good humor all he has to do is to talk about “May.”  The demented man upon being taken back to his cell, talked to himself, saying: “Come black, May; me no see, mo hear.  Money in blalnk; money in hevlin.  Come May.”  Undersheriff Thompson will leave for Pueblo this morning with Lewee.

Tracy, Vera
patient gender F race W age 57 marital status M birthplace Ohio source 1930 census

Tracy, Vera
patient race: W sex: F age: 47 marital:M place of birth: Nebraska occupation: sewing source: 1920 census

Trainor, Anna K.
patient gender F race W age 44 marital status M birthplace New York source 1930 census

Travell, William W.
patient race: W sex: M age: 56 marital:S place of birth: England occupation: none source: 1920 census

Travers, Hugh
Leadville Herald Democrat 1-16-1886 – An Eventful Year (1885) – A Full and Comprehensive Chronological Record of Important Local Occurrences – September 24 – Hugh Travers, an insane person, is lodged in the jail…

Travis, George
patient gender M race W age 58 marital status M birthplace New York source 1930 census

Travis, George
patient race: W sex: M age: 50 marital:M place of birth: New York occupation: farm helper source: 1920 census

Travis, Jack
Rocky Mountain News 1-22-1883 - Doom of the Daft - To Be Placed in Dungeons Unfit for Dogs - No Suitable Place Provided for the Penniless Insane - One of the most important matters which will come up before the present legislature, and which will meet the hearty support of the authorities of every county in the state, is the bill to provide for an appropriation to enlarge and complete the insane asylum at Pueblo.  In its present state of incompletion the asylum will barely accommodate fifty persons, and these uncomfortably.  The result of this is that the state authorities are constantly refusing to accept from counties dozens of insane persons, pleading lack of accommodations in the asylum as their excuse, and the unfortunate beings are thrown into jails, out-houses, cellars or any other disagreeable place where they can be kept with the least trouble or danger.  The Arapahoe commissioners daily receive letters of appeal from the commissioners of other counties, which are not so well provided with accommodations for insane as this county, requesting them to shelter insane men and women in order that they might be given proper medical care.  These letters have to be thrown aside as the commissioners of this county have more insane people on their hands than they can properly care for.  There are now in the county hospital five demented inmates, who cause no end of trouble, and in order that they may not interfere with the conduct of the hospital, are treated very much in the same manner as dangerous criminals.  A News reporter visited the hospital yesterday, accompanied by Mr. J. A. Shreve, chairman of the board of commissioners.  The hospital buildings are two in number and are located on a little knoll just west of Broadway and on the south side of Cherry creek.  Both of the buildings are good looking and substantial in appearance.  Under the direction of Dr. Kelley, the resident physician, the reporter made a complete tour of the hospital.  Every ward was found to be filled with men in various stages of sickness, and suffering with all kinds of diseases.  In one ward in the second building are the patients suffering from acute diseases, such as pneumonia, heart disease and rheumatism.  In this ward the most suffering is visible.  In other wards are men suffering from broken limbs, accidents, chronic diseases, and in a ward by themselves are convalescent patients.  In this way 110 men, women and children are crowded together to share the cup of misery.  Among the patients who are suffering from blindness is Captain Jack Travis, who was once famous as the champion pistol shot of the country.  Very little remains of this once famous man, and as he drags his bent and aged form across the ward, in which he sits continually, the observer can not help but pity him.  Jack like all men who have been famous, is a character in his own way.  His characteristics are excessive talking and excessive melancholy.  It happened yesterday that he was attacked with a fit of melancholy and he was not in a communicative mood, but from his attendants it was learned that he tells big stories of the duels in which he acted as principal and second.  In another ward there is a man named Nels Streeter, who is just recovering from the effects of a railway accident.  This man had a most remarkable operation performed upon him - nothing more or less than removing two inches of the upper bone in the left arm.  He now has complete use of his arm and can move his fingers just the same as if the bone had never been removed.  In the same ward is a laborer named Joseph Brias suffering with frozen hands and feet.  The reporter went from these scenes of misery to the basement of the institution.  This is made decently comfortable by the heat from the boilers.  The front portion is divided off into cells or apartments and are completely devoid of furniture of any kind.  They are cold and cheerless in appearance and must be revolting to the inmates.  In the first of these cells Henry O'Neil is confined.  O'Neil has to be locked up constantly, and has to be kept away from beds or anything which can be destroyed.  The other day he tore an iron bedstead to pieces, and during the operation cut off the front part of his nose.  The wound, though a serious one, was dressed by Dr. Kelley, and is now healing up.  In another cell the reporter saw an object lying on the floor curled up in a blanket and not moving.  This was Ida Stroetger.  She was stark naked, having torn off her clothes, and she was exposed to the cold and chill of her cell.  This poor thing's condition is deplorable in the extreme.  There is another insane patient in the basement named Johnson.  The latter occupies a small couch and rarely ever gets up from it.  An upper story room is occupied by Mr. Godfrey, who was recently adjudged insane.  And there is still another, Agnes Mears.  Dr. Kelley says that the quarters provided for these poor people are not fit to be occupied by dogs, but on account of the crowded wards nothing better can be done for them.  They are practically cut off from seeing the rays of the sun or anything else that is cheerful and aids in the recovery of the insane.  Instead of assisting in their recovery their stay in the county hospital only makes that more improbable.

Trentham, Guy
patient gender M race W age 43 marital status M birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Trescott, Edmund
Rocky Mountain News 6-29-1888 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate Edmund Trescott, lunatic; hearing on petition for appointment of conservator and Mary J. Trescott appointed.

Trescott, Edward
Rocky Mountain News 10-10-1888 – The Courts – County Court – Probate – Estate of Edward Trescott, lunatic; death of lunatic supported by Ralph Talbot; order for discharge of Mrs. Trescott as conservator.

Tresidder, Caroline
Colorado Transcript  8-28-1930 – Vivian's Removal Has Conservator Sought in Court.  A petition to remove John F. Vivian as conservator of the estate of Caroline Tresidder was filed in the Jefferson county court yesterday by Maude Trathen, a niece of Miss Tresidder.  Miss Tresidder, who is 74 years old, was adjudged insane in 1907, at which time Vivian was appointed conservator of her estate.  She was recently released from the insane asylum and now making her home with Mrs. Trathen.  Removal of Vivian as conservator requested on the grounds that he filed no report on the estate since 1907 and that “funds of the estate have been wasted and have not been invested in securities in the manner required by conservators of the laws of the state of Colorado.  No action on the petition, drawn Attorney Jacob V. Schaetzel of Denver, was taken by Judge Charles Call yesterday.

Tresidder, Caroline
patient race W gender F age 55 marital status S place of birth New York source 1910 census

Tresidder, Caroline Miss
admitted 9-14-1897 from N. Y. City - Woodcroft Hospital

Tresidder, Carrie
patient gender F race W age 75 marital status S birthplace New York source 1930 census

Tresidder, Carrie
patient race:W sex:F age: 47 marital: S place of birth: England source: Dr. Works 1900 census

Tresidder, Carrie
patient race: W sex: F age: 65 marital:S place of birth: Michigan occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tresidder, Carrie
admitted 5-11-1900 from Denver, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Treweek, William
Fairplay Flume 6-16-1905 – Sheriff Ringer returned from Pueblo yesterday, where he had gone with Wm. Treweek, an uncle of Wm. Treweek, foreman of the Moose mine, who has been adjudged insane.

Treweek, William
Fairplay Flume 6-23-1905 – Sheriff Ringer is in receipt of a letter from the insane asylum at Pueblo, notifying him of the death of Wm. Treweek, whom he conveyed to that institution only week before last.  No apparent sickness was the cause, but a gradual sinking away that is attributed to meningitis or some similar trouble.

Tribble, Frank
patient race W gender M age . marital status M place of birth Missouri occupation laborer source 1910 census

Tribble, Ray
Wet Mountain Tribune 10-17-1913 – Adjudged Insane – Ray Tribble who was taken into custody by Under Sheriff C. T. Chapman in Orchard Park a couple of weeks ago while in a demented condition and locked up pending an inquiry into his sanity, was adjudged to be of unsound mind by a commission before Judge Cooper in the county court last Saturday morning. Later in the day he was taken by Sheriff Newcomb to Woodcroft's sanitarium at Pueblo for treatment. Tribble who is eighteen years of age, was recently locked up at Silver Cliff for insanity. His father lives in Trinidad – Canon City Record

Trickie, Harry
pupil race: W sex: M age: 13 marital: S place of birth: Colorado source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Trimble, John T.
patient race W sex M month of birth . year of birth 1852 age 48 marital S place of birth Kentucky occupation farmer source 1900 census

Trimble, Truman
Fort Collins Weekly Courier 4-25-1913 – A Lunacy Inquisition? – The county court was today asked for a lunacy inquisition for a popular young druggist. On Monday a gang of gypsies entered the city and did a thriving business telling fortunes. One entered Scott's drug store and engaged the attention of Truman Trimble. It was necessary to have a box of silver to use for a medium and a drawer of change was taken from the safe. Trimble had his fortune told. Last night the drawer was found to be several dollars short. This afternoon Judge Stover agreed to look into Trimble's sanity and Clerk Cushing was asked to make out the necessary documents.

Trincamp, Florence
patient race: W sex: F age: 33 marital:M place of birth: Iowa occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tripp, Freeman
patient gender M race W age 51 marital status S birthplace United States source 1930 census

Tripp, Freeman
patient race W gender M age 29 marital status S place of birth . occupation machinist source 1910 census

Tromell, Weaver F.
pupil race: W sex: M age: 18 marital: S place of birth: Colorado source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Trosper, Agnes
patient race: W sex: F age: 64 marital:M place of birth: West Virginia occupation: dish washer source: 1920 census

Trotman, John
patient gender M race W age 81 marital status Un birthplace England source 1930 census

Trout, G. F.
patient gender M race W age 49 marital status S birthplace Pennsylvania source 1930 census

Troutman, Jacob
Aspen Weekly Times 6-2-1900 – Local Laconics – Jacob Troutman of Rock creek was tried before a jury of six men in Judge Rogers' court Monday on a charge of being insane. Evidence was introducted and the defendant was allowed to speak in his own behalf. The jury found the man insane as charged. Troutman said he was about 39 years old, and was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania; that he removed to Illinois, from there to Wyoming and in '78 or '79 arrived in Colorado. He testified that he was unmarried. A neighbor had his property, which has held subject to his debts. The court sentenced Troutman to Pueblo.

Troutman, Jacob
patient race: W sex: M month of birth: Unk year of birth: 1866 age: 34 marital: S place of birth: unk source : 1900 Woodcroft census

Troutman, Jacob
admitted 5-28-1900 from Pitkin County, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Trugillo, Natividad
patient race: W sex: F none source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Truiner, William
gender m age 40 occupation fireman birthplace Ireland source: 1880 census

Truitt, Mary J.
patient gender F race W age 40 marital status M birthplace Kansas source 1930 census

Trujillo, Agueda
patient race W gender F age 63 marital status W place of birth Colorado occupation housekeeper source 1910 census

Trujillo, Agueda
patient race: W sex: F age: 73 marital:W place of birth: Mexico occupation: none source: 1920 census

Trujillo, Cleothilde
patient gender F race Mex age 50 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1930 census

Trujillo, Desideria L.
patient gender F race W age 31 marital status M birthplace New Mexico source 1930 census

Trujillo, Donaciano
patient gender M race Mex age 60 marital status Un birthplace New Mexico source 1930 census

Trujillo, Juan
patient race: W sex: M age: 14 marital:S place of birth: New Mexico occupation: none source: 1920 census

Trujillo, Maria Agila de Jesus
7-31-1879 Colorado Weekly Chieftain The state insane asylum located in this city will receive one occupant from Trinidad when opened, in the person of Maria Agila de Jesus Trujillo, who has been adjudged a dangerous lunatic. No Wonder. That name would drive anybody crazy.

Trujillo, Nestor
patient gender M race Mex age 80 marital status Wd birthplace New Mexico source 1930 census

Trujillo, Patricio
patient gender M race Mex age 18 marital status S birthplace New Mexico source 1930 census

Trujillo, Pedro
patient race: W sex: M age: 62 marital:M place of birth: New Mexico occupation: none source: 1920 census

Trujillo, Santana
born 1908 buried 12/16/64 at Imperial Cemetery, paid for by State Hospital. Contributed by family

Trujillo, Ursula
admitted 1-1-1914 from Pagosa Springs, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Trujillo, Ursula
patient gender M race Mex age 46 marital status S birthplace New Mexico source 1930 census

Trujillo, Ursula
patient race: W sex: M age: 38 marital:S place of birth: New Mexico occupation: engine room helper source: 1920 census

Trunk, Joseph A. Jr.
patient race: W sex: M age: 18 marital:S place of birth: Indiana occupation: ward helper source: 1920 census

Trunk, Joseph A. Jr.
patient gender M race W age 28 marital status S birthplace Indiana source 1930 census

Tschirge, T.
patient race W gender M age 46 marital status S place of birth Switzerland occupation laborer source 1910 census

Tschirgi, Christ
patient gender M race W age 67 marital status S birthplace Switzerland source 1930 census

Tschirgi, Christ
admitted 6-18-1901 from Gunnison, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Tucker, Benjamin
patient gender M race W age 72 marital status M birthplace Iowa source 1930 census

Tucker, Benjamin
Castle Rock Journal 12-8-1905 – Benjamin Tucker of Greenland was brought before Judge Palm Tuesday Morning and tried for his sanity.  He was adjudged insane and taken to the sanitarium at Pueblo by Sheriff Hilburger Wednesday.

Tucker, Benjamin
Castle Rock Journal 1-26-1906 – Proceedings of the County Commissioners – As to Allowance of Bills, Letting of Contracts and Granting of Rebates of Taxes and Assessments - $28.89, From ordinary county revenue, R. E. Palm, County Judge, Fees Tucker insane, State of Colorado, County of Douglas.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 9-12-1895 – Through a Brick Wall – Thieves Not to Be Baffled by Barriers – One of the most unique burglaries reported at headquarters of late came to the notice of the detectives yesterday morning when their attention was called to a jagged hole about four feet in diameter in the rear wall of C. Tuengel's cutlery and repairing shop at 1425 Lawrence street. The hole was made with a pick after the burglars had made desperate efforts to enter the doors and windows in the front and rear of the building. Owing to the fact that the doors and windows are barred and bolted the parties responsible for the act were unable to gain entrance without attacking the wall. The brick barrier was finally overcome and the appearance of the hole yesterday showed that the persons who did the work had carried out their undertaking in a decidedly persistent fashion. Detectives Watrous and Gardner were detailed upon the case and upon examining the premises where the burglary took place they discovered that a number of valuable papers were missing as well as twenty-five fine knives. The object of the intruders, however, seemed to be to gain possession of the papers and working upon this theory the detectives found that there had been trouble in the Tuengel family. The papers stolen were the property of Otto Tuengel who was taken into custody about two weeks ago upon a charge of insanity and who is now in the county hospital awaiting trial. The Tuengel family live at 1237 Clark street, and from all reports Otto Tuengel and his wife have not lived happily together. Upon frequent occasions Mrs. Tuengel has called at headquarters and requested that her husband be arrested. The detectives have looked into the charges she made against him and have found that they were without foundation. Tuengel is a harmless sort of an individual and his friends say that he is agreeable in disposition, although he is flighty at times. When Tuengel was taken to the county hospital upon a charge of being of unsound mind, his papers, which represented the little property he possessed, were in a desk in the store. His wife has desired to get possession of the papers as most of them were made out in her name, but it appears that C. Tuengel, brother of Otto, has refused to hand them over to her. Tuesday evening, after the shop was closed Mrs. Tuengel was seeen trying to get into the store at the front door but her efforts were unsuccessful. It is believed that she had a hand in the work that took place yesterday morning. The intruders, whoever they were, used a crowbar upon the front door and windows and also upon the doors and windows in the rear. About 2 o'clock yesterday morning people sleeping in the building near the cutlery shop heard the noise made by the burglars but the work went on undisturbed. Mrs. Tuengel, when called upon by the detectives, produced the missing papers and they were handed over to Thomas Ward, who was appointed by Judge Steele to take charge of Tuengel's property. The value of the papers is stated by the detectives to be about $350.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 9-13-1895 – Otto Tuengel's Store – Interesting Developments Are Expected at the Lunacy Trial – The store of Otto Tuengel, at 1425 Lawrence street was opened yesterday by Mrs. Tuengel. Tuengel, who is now at the county hospital awaiting trial as to his sanity, took the keys with him and a duplicate set was made by order of Mrs. Tuengel. It was claimed yesterday by friends of Mrs. Tuengel, that she was not responsible for the burglary that took place at the store early Wednesday morning. They state that other persons whose identity they refuse to divulge, committed the act. There has been trouble in the Tuengel household, however. All the property, however, is in the name of Mrs. Tuengel and it is valued at $10,000. At Tuengel's trial this week some interesting facts may be brought to light.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 9-15-1895 – Tuengel Sane – Jury Find the Cutlery Seller Able to Care for His Own Affairs – The little cutlery shop at 1425 Lawrence street will probably remain open in the future as it has in the past, it's proprietor, Otto Tuengel, lately alleged to be insane, having been discharged as a sane man yesterday afternoon. Thomas Ward, Jr., who was appointed as Tuengel's attorney to defend him in the suit, appeared before Judge Steele yesterday morning and informed his honor that as Tuengel was evidently perfectly sane, his humiliation of being at the hospital could be easily imagined. Ward requested the judge to give Tuengel a hearing and arrangements were finally made whereby he could be tried at the latter half of the afternoon. Accordingly the patient was brought in, followed by Assistant County Attorney Smith who was the prosecuting attorney. The trial occupied about two hours, at the conclusion of which Tuengel, accompanied by his friends, walked from the room with a bland smile. In all, fourteen witnesses were brought onto the stand to testify for or against the sanity of Tuengel, the experts J. T. Eskridge and H. T. Pershing being among the number. That Tuengel was positively a crazy man, was alleged by his wife, his brother-in-law and wife, Attorney Hunt and the insanity experts, Eskridge and Pershing. Eight of the defendant's neighbors and those who had known him in his business for years, testified that he was at the worst only worried or exceptionally nervous. They alleged that he was inoffensive, minding his own affairs, and that while he might have been addicted to liquor, it had not affected his brain in the least. The most interesting testimony elicited at the trial came from the experts, Eskridge and Pershing. The former upon being so instructed, had made a thorough examination of Tuengel Friday last, with the result that he was pronounced not only insane, but positively dangerous. Pershing also testified that the man was crazy and ought to be in the asylum. At last Tuengel was placed on the stand and every eye was upon him as he related, or attempted to relate, the story of the quarrels with his brother-in-law. His story was at times quite disconnected and he spoke in a low voice which was scarcely audible. At one time, however, as some important bit of experience was being related by one of the witnesses, he rose up and started in with a not ever-moderate protestation. Attorney Ward pulled him back in his seat, informing him that if he did not keep his temper he would be sent to Pueblo. This quieted the defendant and he offered no objections during the balance of the case. Thomas Ward, Jr., as attorney for Tuengel, delivered no argument to the jury at the conclusion of the trial, and while the jury was still undecided in its verdict he went downtown. Meeting one of the jurors a little later, he was acquainted with the startling news that Tuengel was declared a sane man, and his astonishment, as he remarked last evening, knew no bounds.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 10-2-1895 – Otto Tuengel's Sanity – False Imprisonment on Lunacy Allegations worth $5,000 – Otto Tuengel yesterday began suit against August F. Wolter, asking for $5,000 damages by reason of false imprisonment. Wolter on September 4 last filed a complaint charging Tuengel with being insane and consequently the latter was jailed from that time until September 14. On this last date he was before the county court on the charge, the verdict rendered adjudging him sane. He claims to have been nearly ruined in business by the imprisonment on the insanity charge, and also to have been wrecked mentally and physically.

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 2-17-1896 – A Crazed Man's Act – Otto Tuergel Drives His Children Into the Street – A peculiarly pathetic case was witnessed in the police court this morning. Otto Tuergel, a gray-haired man, appeared as defendant in a charge of disturbance. His face was dreadfully lacerated, and his general appearance indicated that he had been through a rough experience. Tuergel keeps a cutlery store on Lawrence street, near Fourteenth street. He has a family of pretty daughters, whom at times he is liable, because of his mental disability, to treat in any way but kindly and paternal. His conduct has been so strange that his family had him tried for insanity before the county court, but on the evidence of the medical experts he was acquitted. Last Saturday evening he went to his home at 9:30 o'clock. His two daughters, aged 19 and 17, had retired for the night, but Tuergel insisted on awakening them with an inquiry concerning the material for his Sunday dinner. The replies of his daughters failed to satisfy him, and he proceeded to beat them in a brutal manner. It is said that he kicked them and otherwise maltreated them until they were forced to run into the street in scant clothing for protection. Some of the neighbors interfered for the girls, but this only served to still more infuriate Tuergel, so that it was necessary to use force in order to subdue him. The results of the interference were manifest on Tuergel's face to-day. When Tuergel was called on to plead in the police court, he wandered into a rambling statement, which he would not cease, although requested by the court several times to do so. Attorney Oscar Reuter appeared for Tuergel's children, and made a brief statement of the case to the court. Police Magistrate Abbott continued the hearing of the case until next Wednesday, and ordered that Tuergel be subjected to a medical examination for his sanity by the police surgeons.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 2-20-1896 – Had the Password - … Otto Tuengel, an old man who runs a barbers' supplies establishment on Lawrence, was arrested for disturbance, but it was found that he is insane, and he was committed to the county court for trial as to his lunacy.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 3-10-1896 – Tuengel Is Insane – So Declares a Jury in the County Court Last Night After Deliberating for Five Minutes – Otto Tuengel, the grinder of tools, who has been a familiar figure in Denver for many years, lies in the county jail, a jury having found him insane on complaint of his eldest daughter. The case first came up last fall when he was accused of seeking the life of one Walters, his brother-in-law. His hatred for his brother by marriage was alleged to be an insane one. During his former troubles he was arrested for assault, but the police judge refused to hear the case, saying he was irresponsible. When he came before a jury he succeeded in creating an impression that he was sane and the jury refused to send him to Pueblo, in spite of the testimony of Dr. Eskridge that he was a dangerous lunatic. Some days ago Tuengel was brought into the police court charged with having dragged his daughters from their bed, kicked them and driven them into the street. Police Judge Abbott refused to convict, alleging his irresponsible condition. His eldest daughter, Alma, a fine looking young woman of 18, then had him arrested and tried on a charge of insanity. His wife, his second daughter, Halma, aged 16, and O. B. Hachenberger testified to his actions about the house, his insane delusions regarding his family and relatives, and to fear that he would do damage to himself or others. The jury was out barely five minutes and consigned him to the asylum.

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 3-10-1896 – Otto Tuengel Insane – Otto Tuengel was declared insane by a jury in the county court last night. Tuengel is a cutter, his place of business is at 1425 Lawrence street and his residence is at 1237 Clark street. He has a wife and four children. Tuengel was tried for insanity two months ago, but was acquitted.

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 3-13-1896 – Is Tuengel Insane? – Indignant Friends Are to Thoroughly Test the Question – A petition will probably be filed within a few days in the county court for a new trial of Otto Tuengel, the cutler, whose place of business was at 1425 Lawrence street. Tuengel was found insane by a jury in the county court a week ago and taken to the state asylum at Pueblo. The case is most peculiar. Tuengel is a prosperous German and perfectly sane in many things. The trial last week was the second one, a jury several months before having acquitted him. The evidence at the last trial disclosed that Tuengel was jealous of his brother-in-law, who lived next door to him. He accused the brother-in-law of stealing provisions from the house and being too intimate with his wife. Tuengel also had constant trouble with his wife, who, he said, had, with her brother, conspired against him. Insanity experts Eskridge and Pershing testified that he was insane and liable to attempt to kill one of his family or the brother-in-law. Judge Steele states that the evidence showed that Tuengel was dangerous to his family and had hallucinations. He, however, said that new facts might be brought to light which would warrant another trial. The friends of Tuengel claim that the cutter had good grounds for distrusting his wife and brother-in-law and that while he might have done unwise things in his anger, he is not at all insane. Several men who have known him for many years have taken the matter up and will endeavor to secure another trial.

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 3-16-1896 – Deny Tuengel's Story – Relatives Indignant That Such Statements Should Be Circulated – August A. Walters indignantly denies the statements made with reference to the Otto Tuengel case. Tuengel is an old-time resident of Denver who was recently found insane by a jury and is now confined in the asylum at Pueblo. An effort is being made to secure his release on the ground that the man, while peculiar and eccentric, is not insane and that his incarceration is due to a conspiracy on the part of Walters, his next-door neighbor, and Mrs. Tuengel, who is Walter's sister. Walters, his wife and Mrs. Tuengel say the charges which have been made against them in connection with the case are all due to the disorganized condition of Tuengel's mind and have no foundation in fact. They furthermore claim that Tuengel is not the owner of any property, the house in which they lived being owned by his wife.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 3-24-1896 – Otto Tuengel's Insanity – County Court Asked to Reconsider a Lunacy Commitment – A petition has been signed, and will be presented in the county court asking for a new trial for Otto Tuengel, who was adjudged insane March 9, and who is now confined in the insane asylum at Pueblo. Judge LeFevre, H. P. Steele, George J. Kindel and many other citizens certify that they have known Mr. Tuengel for many years, and that while peculiar, he has never been of unsound mind. Ex-Governor S. H. Elbert, an old-time neighbor of Tuengel, will appear in the latter's behalf. It is claimed that the whole matter is a conspiracy to get possession of Tuengel's property.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 6-2-1896 – Criminal Court Notes – In the West Side court yesterday afternoon Attorney H. J. Hersey in behalf of George J. Kindel made application for a writ of habeas corpus for Otto Tuengel, confined in the state insane asylum. The grounds of the application were persecution and malicious mischief. Judge Le Fevre intimated that he would issue the writ if $40, the expense of bringing Tuengel from Pueblo, was paid into court. This was not done at the adjournment of court.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 6-5-1896 – West Side Court – Otto Tuengel, who was formerly in the cutlery business on Lawrence street, and who was declared insane and sent to the asylum at Pueblo, has filed a petition for a writ of habeas corpus in the West Side court. Yesterday Judge Le Fevre granted the motion of the petitioner to prosecute as a poor person.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 6-9-1896 – Sane Man in Asylum – Otto Tuengel Was Never Demented and Is Released by Pueblo Authorities – It has finally been settled beyond a doubt that Otto Tuengel, who was sent to the Pueblo asylum several weeks ago upon an order from the county court, is not insane. Some time in April last a petition was filed in the county court alleging that Tuengel was so mentally unbalanced as to endanger his own life and the life and property of others. The case came to a hearing, and a jury duly found that such was the case, and Judge Steele thereupon ordered his committal to the asylum. Not long after, it is claimed, that evidence came to the surface showing that the relatives of the accused had connived for the purpose of getting him out of the way in order to obtain possession of his property. The petition alleging insanity is said to be the outcome of such conspiracy. A few days ago, friends of Tuengal realizing the facts in the case, presented before Judge Le Fevre of the criminal court a petition for a writ of habeas corpus, claiming that Tuengel was unjustly sent to the asylum and that he was a sane man. Yesterday the petition came up for hearing, and the proceedings were dismissed. The court in throwing out the case said that it had received word from the superintendent at the asylum that Tuengel was not insane, and that he intended making preparations for his release. Such being the case, there was no need for habeas corpus proceedings. “I never did believe Tuengel to be insane,” said the court afterwards. “At times, it is to be acknowledged, he acted queerly, seemingly keeping aloof from others, but as to his being out of his mind, I never believed it. Many people act queerly who are not out of their head, and I believe Tuengel to be one of them. I am glad the case has turned out as it has.”

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 6-10-1896 – Pronounces Him Sane – Otto Tuengel will be released in a few days from the state insane asylum, where he has been incarcerated as a lunatic since last fall. Dr. Thombs has pronounced him entirely sane now. Tuengel has many friends in Denver.

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 6-11-1896 – Tuengel to Be Released – Pueblo, June 11 – Otto Tuengel, who was sent here from Denver because of insanity, is improving rapidly at the insane asylum, and Dr. Thombs says he will release him in the course of a few days.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 6-11-1896 – Deny the Allegations – Family of Otto Tuengel Insist That He Is Hopelessly Insane – The statement that the incarceration of Otto Tuengel in the insane asylum at Pueblo was unjustifiable and that he was placed in the institution through machinations on the part of his family with the alleged purpose of securing control of his property, is objected to by the family. The legal representative insists that Mr. Tuengel is insane and refers to the records of the court in which the testimony, coupled with that of neighbors, the patient was sent to Pueblo; and, furthermore, the testimony of physicians was that Mr. Tuengel's form of insanity was incurable. He may be mild for three, six, nine months or a year, but with the form with which he is afflicted he may become violent at any moment. This legal adviser refers to Mr. Tuengel's violent action in the justice court when brought to the bar to answer a charge of disturbance. As to the statement about wanting to get hold of his property, the attorney says the conditions make such a proposition impossible. All the property there is is a little cottage at 1357 Clark street. This Tuengel at one time deeded to his wife; later she deeded it back to him in trust for herself and children.

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 10-27-1896 – Tuengel in Trouble – Judge Steele, in the county court has been pursued all the morning by Otto Tuengel, the man whom he some months ago committed to the insane asylum on the charge of insanity. Tuengel claims that he has been released from the county hospital on parole and after earning $90 at hard work, his employer refused to pay him. He was advised to bring suit.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 5-22-1897 – Wants a Divorce – Mrs. Otto Tuengel Thinks She Cannot Live With Her Husband Longer – Charlotte Tuengel wants a divorce from Otto Tuengel, who has been in the county court several times on a charge of being insane. The wife says she was married in Denver on November 12, 1876, and that Tuengel has not only failed to support her, but has called her vile names and threatened her with her life. The couple have four girls. Mrs. Tuengel was allowed by judge Le Fevre to prosecute as a poor person.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 2-5-1897 – Razors in the Air – Desperate Encounter of Deputies With an Insane Cutler – Deputy Sheriffs Ebersole and Murray had a very exciting time of it with an insane man yesterday, during which they had to dodge big butcher knives and a hammer. Otto Tuengel has again been acting queerly, his mania being that his brother was stealing from him. For some time he has been measuring out the meat for the household by rule and doling the bread allowance with great care and complaint was lodged against him. The officers found the man in the shop and in the tussle which occurred before Tuengel was overpowered several large butcher knives and a hammer were attempted to be used on the officers. It was necessary to hold the man all the way to the county hospital.

Tuengel, Otto
Rocky Mountain News 2-10-1897 – Otto Tuengel Again Insane – County Court Bailiff Murray yesterday took to the Pueblo asylum Otto Tuengel, who used knives and a hammer when the officers arrested him last week.

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 1-19-1898 – The Tuengle Divorce – The divorce case of Elizabeth Tuengle from Otto Tuengle will be tried before Judge Allen this afternoon. Mrs. Tuengle wants a divorce on the ground that her husband has been cruel to her, but there is considerable doubt whether the complaint will stand trial. Tuengle is now an inmate in the state insane asylum and the law is that no divorce can be granted where one of the parties is an insane person. But Mrs. Tuengle contends that the acts concerning which she complains were committed previous to the time the husband was adjudged insane.

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 1-20-1898 – Three Divorce Cases - … In the same court yesterday Elizabeth Tuengle was divorced from Otto Tuengle, the charge being habitual drunkenness. The husband is now an inmate of the Pueblo insane asylum.

Tuengel, Otto
Denver Evening Post 12-3-1897 – Wearies Him – Judge Butler Does Not Like to Hear Domestic Brawls – The district court today again wrestled with the divorce problem, a goodly number of cases being docketed for the verdict of jury and the opinion of judge… It is probable that the trial of the water case today will postpone the suit of divorce of Charlotte Tuengel from Otto Tuengel, the case being in Judge Le Fevre's court. This case may not have easy sailing when it comes up for trial. Tuengel is now confined in the Pueblo asylum for insane, and no law exists which makes it possible for a lunatic to defend himself from such a charge, and therefore the case may not be allowed further progress than the filing of it. Mrs. Tuengel does not charge insanity as a reason for divorce, but alleges habitual drunkenness. Furthermore she charges that he threatened to kill her on March 16, 1896, and again on February 19, 1893 (?), when she had to flee from her house. They were married in 1876 and four girls, in whose names the letter “a” is reiterated with alliterative effect, have been their issue. They are Wanda, 17 years old; Nora, 16 years old; Paula, 14 years old, and Stella, 12 years old…

Tuhill, John
patient gender M race W age 70 marital status S birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Tuhill, John
patient race: W sex: M age: 59 marital:S place of birth: Missouri occupation: farm helper source: 1920 census

Tull, Samuel
admitted 1-3-1901 from Leadville, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Tull?, Fred
patient race W sex M month of birth March year of birth 1858 age 42 marital M place of birth Indiana occupation miner source 1900 census

Tully, William H.
patient race: W sex: M age: 66 marital:. place of birth: England occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tumbleson, Susan
Boulder County Herald Weekly 6-26-1895 – Mrs. Susan Tumbleson, of Ward, was declared insane 20 June 1895 by a jury. “The unfortunate woman's mind is a perfect blank.” Source “Boulder County, Colorado, Deaths and the Insane, 1859 – 1900,” by Mary McRoberts.

Tumbleson, Susan
admitted 9-26-1896 from Boulder, Co - Woodcroft Hospital

Tumbleson, Susan
Boulder Daily Camera 6-13-1896 – Local News – Sheriff Dyer left for Pueblo today, having in custody Mrs. Thos. Tumbleson, insane.

Tumbleson, Susan
Boulder Daily Camera 6-15-1896 – Local News – Sheriff Dyer and wife returned on the morning train from Pueblo after placing Mrs. Tumbleson, the insane lady, in the careful charge of the authorities of the insane asylum. On their return they were considerably delayed by the wreck of a freight train on the road ahead.

Turley, Orville J.
Telluride Daily Journal 7-11-1922 – Decide Today of Condition of Murderer – Turley's Sanity Trial Opened Today in the State Capital – Denver, July 11. – The trial of (Orville) Turley, self confessed murderer of Mrs. Emma Wise, began today.  The trial is for the purpose of determining the question sane or insane.

Turley, Orville J.
Steamboat Pilot 6-28-1922 – Orville Turley, self confessed perpetrator of the most atrocious crime that has stained the record of Colorado, has been pronounced insane by a medical commission. To hang or at least chloroform a few insane people might have a salutary effect.

Turley, Orville J.
Fort Collins Courier 6-22-1922 – O. J. Turley Is Declared Insane By Physicians – By United Press.  Denver, June 22. – Orville J. Turley, confessed slayer of Mrs. Emma Wise, today was declared insane by Drs. Moline and Delenanty.  Turley was examined at the request of the prosecution.  He may still be tried for the murder, however.

Turley, Orville J.
Fort Collins Courier 6-26-1922 – Judge Butler Denies Turley Venue Change – Confessed Murderer In Denver, Again Pronounced Insane and Physician Says His Disease Will Kill Him In Two Years; Insanity Hearing Planned.  By Associated Press.  Denver, June 26. – District Judge Charles C. Butler, today denied a petition for a change of venue by attorneys for Orville J. Turley, facing a trial in the criminal court here on a charge of first degree murder in connection with the slaying of Mrs. Emma G. Wise, whose mutilated body was found in the furnace pipe of a North Denver house on June 17.  Turley confessed that he had killed Mrs. Wise after the body was found.  He was later declared insane by two Denver alienists appointed by Judge Butler to examine him.  A second report declaring Turley insane was presented today by Dr. Howell T. Pershing, Denver alienist, and a member of the county court sanity commission.  Dr. Pershing's report stated that Turley would probably die within two years from the effects of his disease.  Following the submission of this report, District Attorney Philip Van Cise asked that an inquiry be held in the county court to determine legally the question of Turley's sanity.

Turley, Orville J.
Fort Collins Courier 6-29-1922 – Turley May Be Sent To Pueblo Without Trial – By Associated Press. Denver, June 29. – District Attorney Phillip S. Van Cise today announced that Orville J. Turley, confessed slayer of Mrs. Emma Wise, will be removed to the state insane asylum at Pueblo tomorrow morning providing the lunacy commission now examining Turley reports that he is insane.  The commission is expected to make its report late today.  Turley was declared insane recently by two Denver alienists, and Dr. Cyrus L. Pershing, who took a blood test.  Mrs. Wise was found brutally slain several weeks ago in a North Denver residence.  The body had been wedged into a furnace pipe.

Turley, Orville J.
Fort Collins Courier 7-18-1922 – Turley Found Sane By Jury; Will Be Tried – In Spite of Report of Several Boards of Alienists That Confessed Murderer Is Insane, Jury Decides Denver Man Must Stand Trial. (By Associated Press) – Denver, July 18. – Orville J. Turley, confessed slayer of Mrs. Emma G. Wise, whose mutilated body was found in a furnace pipe of a North Denver house, June 17, was declared sane by a jury in the Denver county court today.  Turley had previously been declared insane by three different boards of alienists who had examined him, but the jury followed the testimony of laymen who expressed the belief on the witness stand that Turley was sane.  Turley must now face trial on a charge of first degree murder in the district court.  Following the report of alienists early this month declaring Turley insane preliminary steps had been taken by the court to commit him to the state insane asylum at Pueblo.  City officials, however, led by Mayor Dewey C. Bailey, protested against the commitment, as they are privileged to do under the law, and demanded a jury trial to determine the question of Turley's sanity.

Turley, Orville J.
Fort Collins Courier 6-4-1923 – Turley Must Spend Life In The Pen – Murderer of Mrs. Wise Will Not Be Able To Escape Penitentiary On Ground of Insanity; Sentence Is Approved By High Court – By Associated Press.  Denver, June 4. – Orville J. Turley, convicted of the sensational murder of Mrs. Emma G. Wise of Denver, June 13, 1922, must serve a life term in the Colorado penitentiary, according to a decision handed down today by the supreme court.  Mrs. Wise disappeared on the early morning of June 13, 1922.  On June 15, Turley appeared at the Denver police station and asked property (?).  He was arrested the same day in connection with her disappearance, but denied all knowledge of the case.  On June 17 the police searched his Denver home and found her body.  He later confessed having taken Mrs. Wise to his home on June 13 and after obtaining her signature to a bill of sale for a rooming house property and a check for about $380 struck her, choked her into unconsciousness, tied a rope around her neck and pushed her body down a furnace ventilating pipe, tied the rope to a register and allowed the body to hang.  Turley, according to the confession, returned to the place in the evening, cut the rope, stayed in the house that night and the next morning poured dirt into the register and over the body.  He was pronounced insane by alienists, but District Attorney VanCise demanded his prosecution for murder and he was tried and convicted.  Justice Burke, who delivered the opinion upholding the district court in commenting on the claim of Turley's attorneys that one of the prosecuting attorneys had improperly said to the jury that the defendant had started his defense with alienists and ended with jailbirds, declared: “This statement, of course, was so true and the jurors cognizant of the facts that further comment is unnecessary.  We are in full accord with the trial judge in his statement that the evidence was ample to justify the verdict.”  Turley who is being held in the Denver jail will probably be taken to the penitentiary at once.

Turley, Orville J.
Fort Collins Courier 7-3-1923 – Turley Must Stay In Pen For Life – Denver, July 2. – Orville J. Turley, convicted of the murder of Mrs. Emma J. Wise in Denver June 13, 1923, must serve a life sentence in the Colorado penitentiary, the supreme court held today in denying him a rehearing in the case.  Turley, according to the evidence in the case, mutilated the body of Mrs. Wise and then stuffed it down the furnace ventilating pipe in his home.  He was given a hearing to determine his sanity, was held sane, then tried and convicted of murder.  His defense was that he was insane at the time of the killing.

Turley, Orville J.
Fort Collins Courier 8-24-1923 – Turley, Denver Killer, Occupies Insane Ward – Denver, Aug. 23. – Orville J. Turley, who was sentenced to the state penitentiary for life for the murder of Mrs. Emma G. Wise more than a year ago, had been confined in the insane ward at the prison.  Turley entered insanity as a defense during his trial.  The verdict of guilty to first degree murder, on which he was sentenced, was returned after jurymen held him to have been sane.

Turner, Charles A.
patient gender M race W age 72 marital status S birthplace Canada - Eng source 1930 census

Turner, Charles A.
patient race: W sex: M age: 62 marital:S place of birth: Canada occupation: ward helper source: 1920 census

Turner, Curtis L.
patient, male, white, age 79, widowed, born New York, 1930 Woodcroft census

Turner, Cyrus
patient race: W sex: M age: 53 marital: W place of birth: Iowanone source: 1910 Woodcroft census

Turner, Cyrus
Wray Rattler – 11-26-1909 Cyrus Turner, the clerk for the Shields hotel became quite insane Monday evening. Tuesday morning Mr. Turner left on No. 3 going west. It is not known where he went. Mr. Turner had shown signs of insanity for more than a week. He talked to himself a great deal and upon receiving a letter Monday, which purported to be from his wife in the East, he became very much worse.

Turner, Edna
patient gender F race W age 41 marital status M birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Turner, Elizabeth
Aspen Weekly Times 11-16-1895 – A Courtesan's Fate, Adjudged Insane by A County Court Jury – Became an Imbecile Through Excesses – Property Acquired in Younger Days All Gone – Wrecked Physically and Mentally – From Tuesday's Daily - Elizabeth Turner, otherwise known as Mrs. Elizabeth Maxfield, was adjudged of unsound mind by a jury in the county court yesterday.  The defendant in this case is a woman with a history, very little of which is known in Aspen, however.  Except for that portion of her career which was spent here, her life's lesson might never be recorded.  Testimony in the examination made by the authorities did not cover a period extending back over eight years ago.  She was a resident of the demi monde district then and continued as such a resident until disease overtook her.  As Lizzie Turner she was known to the half world in which she moved.  Since retirement to a lowly cabin, there to pass declining years in loneliness and without the comforts of companionship, she went by the name of Mrs. Maxfield.  Where she got that cognomen is unknown.  The woman's end has almost arrived, and the lunacy proceedings in the civil court are expected to precede by only a few days her death.  The evidence showed that for many years she had been subject to epileptic fits.  These became more frequent and severe until, the physician stated on the stand, the nervous system was no longer strong enough to get into convulsions.  Last May she fell upon a stove while in a fit and burned one hand almost off.  But for the timely coming upon the scene of a neighbor the member would have been cremated.  Three months ago her mind gave way and it has dwindled until none of it remains.  The woman is an embecile, a most hopeless physical and mental wreck.  She cannot talk and knows naught what transpires around her.  The county court jury which heard the evidence in her case was composed of Julius Reiner, Phil Coll, J. D. Ryan, L. P. Wolfe, J. D. Hawkins and C. A. Strauss.  These men acting in an official capacity, visited Mrs. Maxfield's cabin in the alley between Durant and Cooper and Hunter and Galena streets.  They found her in a pitiable condition.  Friends had provided for her a nurse during the last few days.  She was at one time possessed of some property, but this dwindled until none remains in her name now.  Dr. Ramsey, examiner in lunacy, testified that her condition would not warrant removal.  She has relatives in the east but none in the west.

Turner, Elizabeth
Aspen Weekly Times 11-30-1895 – Sent to the Insane Asylum – From Tuesday's Daily.  Judge Johnson, in the county court yesterday, ordered that Mrs. Elizabeth Maxfield be transferred from the Citizens' hospital to the Pueblo insane asylum.  It was shown by testimony that her mania is taking a turn for the worse and she had become unmanageable.  Mrs. Maxfield was found insane by a county court jury last week, but her removal to the asylum was deemed inexpedient until such time as her general health might improve.  With better physical conditions, which the court was informed had resulted from hospital treatment, the unfortunate woman has become a raving maniac.

Turner, Ella
patient race W gender F age 26 marital status M place of birth Hungary source 1910 census

Turner, Ella
patient gender F race W age 47 marital status M birthplace Austria source 1930 census

Turner, Ella
patient race: W sex: F age: 36 marital:M place of birth: Austria occupation: none source: 1920 census

Turner, Henrietta
patient gender F race W age 74 marital status Wd birthplace England source 1930 census

Turner, James
patient race W gender M age 20 marital status S birthplace Colorado source 1920 Woodcroft hospital census

Turner, M. W.
Denver Evening Post 3-18-1896 – Four Men Found Insane – Four men were adjudged insane in the county court last evening. M. W. Turner, an old man, believed that he owned the First National bank… All four will be taken to Pueblo.

Turner, May
patient race: B sex: F age: 40 marital:M place of birth: Massachusetts occupation: none source: 1920 census

Turner, Mrs.
Collbran Plateau Voice 1-16-1914 – Peninsula Items – Art Turner has brought his mother home from Pueblo, and his sister, Mrs. Hudson from Kansas, will undertake the care of her mother.

Turner, Mrs. John
Aspen Democrat 6-26-1909 Insane Woman Terrorizes Her Neighbors With Knife - Grand Junction, June 25, Mrs. John Turner, a widow 60 years old who lives on a ranch near Colbran became violently insane there last night and threatened the lives of those on the ranch. She brandished guns and knives, terrorizing the whole neighborhood. Officers left for Colbran to her and bring her to this city, where she will be tried for insanity.

Turner, Mrs. John
6-26-1909 Aspen Democrat Times Insane Woman Terrorizes Her Neighbors With Knife – Grand Junction, Colo. June 25 – Mrs. John Turner, a widow 60 years old who lives on a ranch near Colbran became violently insane there last night and threatened the lives of those on the ranch. She brandished guns and knives, terrorizing the whole neighborhood. Officers left for Colbran to get her and bring her to this city, where she will be tried for insanity.

Turner, Nellie
Colorado Springs Gazette 3-20-1918 - Nellie Turner and Edward Olander were taken to Pueblo yesterday by Sheriff John Weir, where they will be confined in the state insane asylum.

Turner, Ralph B.
Rocky Mountain News 6-5-1892 – Disease, Not Crime – Kid Turner, the Adroit Forger, Said to Suffer from an Unbalanced Brain – Moral Sense Deficient According to the Evidence of Dr. Eskridge, the Expert Alienist – Ralph W. Turner, otherwise known as the Kansas City kid, is insane. So a jury returned to the county court yesterday afternoon. The public will not be more surprised at this finding than the “kid” evidently was himself. Turner has had a rather checkered career. The day before Christmas last he was placed on trial in the district court on a charge of forgery. He refused to accept the services of an attorney and pleaded his own cause. For an hour he held jury, court and audience spell bound by one of the most remarkable arguments that has ever been heard in a Denver court room. The jury, despite his eloquence, found him guilty. Judge Rucker, before whom the case was tried, thought he would give the defendant another show. He set aside the verdict and assigned Ralph Talbot as counsel. Turner was a second time convicted and bond was given for his appearance. In the interim, after his counsel had succeeded in obtaining a supersedeas, Turner seems to have employed his leisure hours in wholesale forgeries, mostly of small amounts invariably signing the name of S. S. Simpson. These forgeries grew so frequent, that Judge Bentley after fixing Turner's bail at $5,000, ordered that a trial be had as to his sanity. The hearing which was conducted yesterday before a jury in the county court, was a most remarkable one. Albert S. Frost was assigned by Judge Miller to appear as guardian for Turner. Mr. Frost, however, instead of defending his client, made an elaborate speech to show that Turner was insane. S. S. Abbott, representing the district attorney's office, objected, claiming that Frost was appearing against the prisoner instead of for him. The court held that in matters of this kind great latitude should be allowed. Ralph Talbot told the story of his connection with the case and Dr. Eskridge said that the prisoner's moral sense was not up to the average; that Turner has the idea that he could forge checks under $20 and that there was no harm in it so long as he made the amounts good. The doctor said that he was a monomaniac on the subject and was incurable. Turner was placed on the stand in his own behalf. He said that he was 22 years of age; that on his trial he had talked nearly an hour in his defense, but didn't think he could do it now. He said he knew it was wrong to commit forgery. He had had an interest in gambling rooms on the West side and had dealt faro and run a roulette wheel there. After getting out on bail, he had lived with an uncle in Ouray. Turner frankly admitted the forgeries, for which there are now some fifteen cases pending. “I have been arrested enough times to know it is wrong,” he blandly answered. He said that he had returned to Denver so that his bonds would not be forfeited. Deputy District Attorney Abbott argued that if the plea made in this case were allowed the doors of the county jail might as well be opened and all the prisoners released. The jury was composed of men who usually sit on such cases in this court, and they were out but a few moments when they returned a verdict that Turner was morally irresponsible. The prisoner will be sent to the asylum, where he confidently claims he will remain but a few months. Turner has the reputation of being just as slick as they make 'em. When last arrested he had about $4 upon his person. Captain Crews, the jailer, gave him upon his release a check for that amount. Turner afterwards complained bitterly to the captain of his (Turner's) shortsightedness. “I'm mighty sorry,” said the kid, “that I didn't rate (?) that $4 check to $400. I could have done it just as well as not, and I'm sorry I didn't.” Pending further proceedings in the district court, Turner is in the custody of the sheriff.

Turner, Ralph B.
Rocky Mountain News 6-23-1892 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Miller – The following business was transacted yesterday: Lunacy of Ralph Turner; judgment on verdict; guardian ad litem allowed $15.

Turner, Ralph B.
Rocky Mountain News 7-10-1892 – The Kansas City “Kid” – Turner, the Forger, Brags of His Escape From Punishment – R. B. Turner, the “Kansas City Kid,” has broken out in a new place. Several weeks ago a jury in the county court solemnly declared that Turner was insane. Everybody, including Turner himself, knew that he wasn't. Yesterday there was a sensation at the county jail when a letter from Turner to his wife in Missouri was intercepted. In this letter the kid stated that he had been adjudged incapable of managing his own affairs. This, he went on to say, had been brought about through the efforts of County Attorney Le Fevre and Dr. Eskridge, assisted, he added, “by my attorney, Ralph Talbot and guardian ad litem, Mr. Frost.” The Kid's epistle was of a delicately sarcastic nature. “Since my incarceration here,” he said, “my reason has largely returned to me, so that I am now able to recognize many of the guard. I shall go to the asylum for a short time, when I shall be free.” The Kid underscored the statement that he would be at Pueblo but a short time. It has already been related in The News as to the escapade of his being taken by a guard at the county jail to a house of ill-repute. He was seen at a saloon in the city on Wednesday evening in company with an officer, which would seem to indicate that the Kid has a pull. Captain Crews, the jailor, yesterday said to a News reporter that a letter had been forwarded by Turner to his wife, but declined to give the nature of the contents. The above information was obtained from a party who saw the epistle and it is a notorious fact that Turner, although in the custody of the sheriff is allowed the liberty of the town. Judge Bentley ordered the inquiry into Turner's sanity after the latter had been convicted of forgery and while several similar charges were pending. After the verdict of the jury was rendered, Judge Miller ordered Turner into the custody of the sheriff to await the further order of the district court.

Turner, Ralph B.
Rocky Mountain News 10-11-1892 – Court of Appeals – The court reversed the decision of the Arapahoe county district court in the case of R. B. Turner who has been adjudged insane by the county court. The attorney general confessed that certain errors had occurred in the trial of the case in the lower court and recommended that the judgment of the district court be reversed.

Turner, Ralph B.
Rocky Mountain News 10-11-1892 – Moral Insanity – Dr. Eskridge Discusses the Various Forms of This Mental Disease – Dr. Eskridge addressed the Medico-Legal society at its meeting in Judge Rising's court room last evening upon the topic of “Moral Insanity.” Dr. McLauthlin presided. Several ladies were present. The paper by Dr. Eskridge dealt with four varieties of moral insanity. One was the case of young Turner, the frequent forger of small checks, who was not long ago declared insane. This species the speaker thought incurable. The young man forged checks as a matter of convenience, and had no idea whatever of the rights of others. If he had money in his pocket he still took a delight in passing worthless paper, simply for the object of indulging in his mania. Another case was that of a woman who became insane at the birth of her first child, and upon apparent recovery developed into a kleptomaniac. She would steal articles for which she had no possible use. This mania was due to physical causes and could possibly be cured. Another woman, who had formed the morphine habit, forged eighteen checks for small amounts, one after another; and then, although the proof was convincing against her, and she was sent to prison, denied all knowledge of the fact. The morphine had made her a confirmed liar as well as a criminal. A young man who had used twenty grains of morphine daily for some time presented a similar case. The paper concluded by a suggestion of more strict laws against the sale of morphine and other drugs, and with a hope that a solution of the treatment of morally insane and imbecile people may be found.

Turner, Ralph B.
Denver Evening Post 4-19-1897 – Turner Came Back – An Ex-Convict Annoys the Police by Reappearing Here – Ralph B. Turner, better known to the police as “Kid” Turner, an alleged passer of fraudulent checks, who has operated here with tolerable success, has returned to this city. He was observed by the police late Saturday evening, and was taken before Chief Russell. He ordered Turner to leave Denver within twenty-four hours. The fellow is an ex-convict from Topeka, Kan., where he once received a twelve-year sentence for passing a fraudulent check. The fellow for a similar offense was sentenced early in 1892 to eight years at Canon City, but inside of six months was released on a writ of supersedeas granted by the supreme court. As in a very little while Turner managed to have himself pronounced insane in the county court he escaped his original sentence. He has been away from Denver for several years.

Turner, Ralph B.
Rocky Mountain News 1-7-1893 – A Lunatic at Large – Kid Turner, the Forger, Turned Loose by the Court – Ralph R. Turner, “the Kansas City Kid,” was yesterday released from confinement in the county jail by order of Judge Miller. Application was made by the mother, Mary O. Turner, who represented that the patient was threatened with “a decline,” that his health was impaired and that further incarceration would probably result in a physical and mental wreck so far as the boy was concerned. Turner has had a most remarkable experience. Arrested and convicted of forgery a year ago, released by the court, he was again placed upon trial. The plea was then made by his counsel that he was not accountable for his idiosyncrasies. Brought into the county court, he was found incapable of managing his own affairs and was by the court committed to the insane asylum at Pueblo. He has, however, since the time of his sentence, June 4 last, been held at the county jail.

Turner, Ralph B.
Rocky Mountain News 4-19-1897 – Insanity Trick Exposed – “Kid” Turner Fooled the Denver Courts Once – Three characters were last night ranged before the night patrolmen as they were lined up before going on duty at the city hall and after their appearance and general make-up had been well taken in by the officers they were given their freedom. They were Ralph B. Turner, familiarly known as Kid Turner; S. C. Koehler and S. B. Sackett, all known as “sure thing” men and persons who would willingly “go against any game.” The trio arrived on Friday morning from Butte, Mont., and on Saturday night were met by a reception committee in the shape of Detectives Loomis, Burlew and Ingersoll and Officer Branch. It developed that they had tossed up a coin recently in Butte, agreeing to take in Denver if it turned heads and to go further East should the opposite side of the coin turn up. Heads it turned and true to the compact the three made for Denver. They were just sizing up the city and preparing to turn a few tricks, it is supposed, when the officers discovered them and decided that they were not needed here. They were accordingly arrested on Curtis street late on Saturday night and last evening were taken before the chief. Turner was given until this evening to leave town. Sackett will go this afternoon and Koehler agreed to shake the place last night. The patrolmen were given a good look at the men and instructed to arrest any one of them they should see in town after their time for staying should expire to-day. Well Known Character – Kid Turner is a character well known about Denver, especially in police circles. He is not more than 25 years old and is known as the smoothest man in his line that has yet reached the city. Passing fraudulent checks is his forte, and he is an adept (party?) in that business. Being a good penman and having a good appearance he finds not the least trouble in deceiving the most wary. He was first heard of in Denver December 1, 1891, when he was arrested for passing a number of fraudulent checks and was held in the sum of $300. On December 7, while yet out on bail, he passed two more fraudulent checks, and was again arrested and released on $1,500 bond. Two days after that he wanted some more money and passed more check

Turner, Ralph B.
Rocky Mountain News 4-19-1897 – Insanity Trick Exposed – “Kid” Turner Fooled the Denver Courts Once – Three characters were last night ranged before the night patrolmen as they were lined up before going on duty at the city hall and after their appearance and general make-up had been well taken in by the officers they were given their freedom. They were Ralph B. Turner, familiarly known as Kid Turner; S. C. Koehler and S. B. Sackett, all known as “sure thing” men and persons who would willingly “go against any game.” The trio arrived on Friday morning from Butte, Mont., and on Saturday night were met by a reception committee in the shape of Detectives Loomis, Burlew and Ingersoll and Officer Branch. It developed that they had tossed up a coin recently in Butte, agreeing to take in Denver if it turned heads and to go further East should the opposite side of the coin turn up. Heads it turned and true to the compact the three made for Denver. They were just sizing up the city and preparing to turn a few tricks, it is supposed, when the officers discovered them and decided that they were not needed here. They were accordingly arrested on Curtis street late on Saturday night and last evening were taken before the chief. Turner was given until this evening to leave town. Sackett will go this afternoon and Koehler agreed to shake the place last night. The patrolmen were given a good look at the men and instructed to arrest any one of them they should see in town after their time for staying should expire to-day. Well Known Character – Kid Turner is a character well known about Denver, especially in police circles. He is not more than 25 years old and is known as the smoothest man in his line that has yet reached the city. Passing fraudulent checks is his forte, and he is an adept (party?) in that business. Being a good penman and having a good appearance he finds not the least trouble in deceiving the most wary. He was first heard of in Denver December 1, 1891, when he was arrested for passing a number of fraudulent checks and was held in the sum of $300. On December 7, while yet out on bail, he passed two more fraudulent checks, and was again arrested and released on $1,500 bond. Two days after that he wanted some more money and passed more checks. His bail was increased by $300 and it was while he was out looking for a bondsman in the company of a bailiff that he stepped into a store and succeeded in cashing a check in the name of Emma S. Barker. He was tried in the criminal court on December 19. He turned up his nose at the proffered assistance of a lawyer and conducted his case for himself. Bringing all of his acute senses into play, he questioned his witnesses with the air of the best lawyer in the land, bringing out fine points and arousing the admiration of every person in the room. His address to the jury was a gem. He not only attempted to prove that he was asleep at a hotel during the time when he was supposed to have been passing the check of Mrs. Barker, but tried to show that he was in jail when the other checks were passed. He aroused the sympathy of the jurors and of every occupant in the court room as he fluently told how his wife was sick, how he had fallen a prey to ill luck and related a hundred incidents to show that he should be innocent of the crime of passing checks. Escaped Imprisonment – The jury returned a verdict of guilty, but recommended clemency. On January 2, 1892, he was sentenced to eight years in the penitentiary, but on the intervention of Ralph Talbot was released on a supersedeas. While he was at liberty he committed four more offenses and was arrested on April 20, 1892, by Detectives Loomis and Burlew. He feigned insanity when placed in the county jail and was released. He was sentenced to twelve years in the penitentiary at Topeka, Kan., a short time after and is at present out on a supersedeas from that place. One of Turner's ruses is to remove his hat and coat, place a pen behind his ear and rush into a store and throw a check on the counter with the air of an employe of the firm “just next door.” His checks were invariably cashed and Turner was generally out of the way when the fraud was discovered. He told the police that he came to Denver for the purpose of visiting his parents who live at 830 Twenty-fifth street. He says he spent Friday night at home and the family had planned to have a big dinner yesterday to celebrate the reunion. He was much disgusted while having to lie in jail all day instead of visiting with his folks, but faithfully promised to leave town to-day. Chief Russell has expressed his intention of keeping all suspicious characters, especially gamblers and confidence men, out of the city. As fast as they arrive, providing the officers know of it, they will be immediately pushed along.

Turpey, Michael
Greeley Tribune 1-26-1899 – Michael Turpey, formerly of Keokuk, Ia., was adjudged insane in County court Thursday. [see Michael Thorpy]

Turrell, Clara M.
patient race W gender F month born . year born 1864 age 36 marital status M place of birth Indiana occupation housekeeper source : 1900 census

Turrell, Clara M.
patient race W gender F age 45 marital status M place of birth Indiana source 1910 census

Tuttle, Emma
Rocky Mountain News 4-15-1890 – Local Brevities – M. Murrott was taken to the county hospital yesterday. He was slightly demented. Mrs. Tuttle, another insane person, was also removed to the county institution.

Tuttle, Emma
Rocky Mountain News 4-20-1890 – Courts and Clients – The Staid Precincts of the County Court Turned Upside Down by an Insane Woman – There was a mingling of fun and sadness in the county court yesterday when Mrs. Ed Tuttle was presented by the county officers in order to be examined as to her mental condition. The lady was neatly dressed and, to all appearances, had arrived at that time of life when she could neither be called young or old. In her own opinion, however, she is a juvenile, and one that can do more talking in five minutes than the most voluble Irishwoman could crowd in across a wicket fence in an hour. A lawyer had been provided to defend her at the expense of the county, but her case was no sooner called than she declared her intention to conduct her own defense, giving it as her opinion that lawyers, at best, are mere bunco steerers. Doctors she characterized as butchers, stem-winding murderers, who would just as soon knife a patient as cure him. As to the court, she had also her opinion of that – it was all a farce, a delusion and a snare and Stenographer Gillette she regarded as but a detective in disguise. Medical testimony was scarcely necessary to prove that the woman's mind was unbalanced, but Dr. Eskridge placed the matter beyond all doubt. He thought if she was given her liberty she would be dangerous both to the community and herself. The medico was cross-examined by the lady. “Who are you, anyway?” “My name is Eskridge.” “No it ain't. You are suffering from spinal meningitis and your days are numbered. Show me your diploma. This is only a great conspiracy. I'm onto you, you old Guy Fawkes, and I'll have you in the penitentiary in a week.” In this way the woman was rushing along at a headlong speed, and it was only with difficulty that the bailiffs could bring her under subjection. Mrs. Tuttle is the woman who some days ago was the means of raising a literal, as well as a metaphorical odor in her neighborhood, when it became noised abroad that she was harboring something dead on her premises. The stench eventually became so terrible and nauseating that the people were in arms, a policeman's services were called in and a march made upon the Tuttle mansion. On entering the house the gravest suspicions of the attacking party were placed beyond all doubt, as the smell was of a nature to put the highest-flavored Limburger to the blush. The lady pleaded innocence but the party had come for business and would not leave until a search was made. Nothing less than the digging up of a putrid corpse was expected and the task as well as a suspicious-looking trunk were approached with a caution akin to fear. The cop, however, was equal to the task and breaking open the box, the decomposed remains of – a dorg (dog), were presented to view. Only a poor little cur for which the woman had some affection. While the jury were considering their verdict Mrs. Tuttle again made things lively, until a verdict of guilty was pronounced. Her next escapade was to have a stand up fight with the bailiff whose duty it was to transfer her to the county jail prior to her departure for the Pueblo asylum to-day.

Tuttle, Lemuel
gender m age 40 occupation Miner birthplace Ohio source: 1880 census

Tweden, Dagmer
patient gender F race W age 29 marital status S birthplace Nebraska source 1930 census

Tweed, Chas
patient race W sex M age 69 marital M place of birth Ohio occupation civil engineer source 1920 Woodcroft census

Tweed, Maggie
Denver Rocky Mountain News 1-25-1895 - Maggie Asked For Money - An Insane Patient Makes It Interesting at the Court House - Maggie Tweed, who has recently been in the county hospital under treatment for lunacy, but was discharged as being harmless; made it rather lively for Clerk Steele in Chairman Wells' office yesterday afternoon.  Mrs. Tweed suddenly entered the office and demanded that she be given money to rent and furnish a house and that a goodly supply of groceries, fuel, etc, be sent to her at once.  "But we do not give money," said Mr. Steele, "to any applicants for help.  If you are in need we will see what can be done for you."  "No," said Mrs. Tweed, "I want money.  If you don't give it to me I will go to Dave Moffat.  He is a friend of mine and I know he will give me what I want."  After further talk of a similar tenor Mr. Steele saw that the woman was unbalanced, mentally, and an order was made committing her again to the county hospital.  She was formerly in good circumstances in Leadville and is well known to the old-timers there.

Tweed, Maggie
Rocky Mountain News 7-26-1895 – Unfortunate Insane – Long List of the Afflicted Set for Trial – The following list of unfortunates will be tried during August in order to determine whether they are sane or not: Maggie Tweed…

Tweed, Maggie
Rocky Mountain News 8-1-1895 – Court Calendar – County Court – Judge Steele – Call for to-day: People vs. Maggie Tweed; lunacy.

Tweed, Maggie
Rocky Mountain News 8-2-1895 – Insane Vagaries – Lunacy Cases in the County Court with the Usual Result – A number of lunacy cases were tried in the county court yesterday and a verdict of guilty returned in every instance… Maggie Tweed thought everybody she met was an old acquaintance, and she was very friendly to Clerk Clark… All the unfortunates will be sent to the Pueblo asylum as soon as room can be made for them.

Tweed, Maggie
Rocky Mountain News 12-24-1896 – Bodies Without Claimants – Dilemma of an Undertaker with Surplus Cadavers – The McGovern Undertaking company have at their headquarters, 1442 Arapahoe street, the bodies of Miss Annie Burnham and Mrs. Margaret Tweed, who have been confined in the state lunatic asylum at Pueblo up to the time of their death. The bodies are awaiting the arrival of friends or relatives to arrange for their interment and so far none have presented themselves. Miss Burnham was sent to the asylum August 8, 1891, while Mrs. Tweed was taken to Pueblo on Oct. 22, 1895. One man yesterday said that he thought that Mrs. Tweed was the divorced wife of Al Tweed of Leadville, but was not certain. Mr. McGovern is now scouring the city in search of relatives of the deceased.

Tweek, Charles
Colorado Springs Gazette 3-7-1911 – In the county court yesterday, Charles Tweek was adjudged insane and was last night taken to Woodcroft sanatorium, Pueblo.

Tylee, Jim
Elbert County Banner 10-11-1907 – Deputy Sheriffs Corkett and Tweedy brought a demented man to Kiowa Saturday from Horse creek whose name in Jim Tylee.  Three times before he has received treatment at the insane asylum.  His wife requested he be taken.  He was given an examination before Judge Fahrion's court and found to be insane.

Tyler, F. M.
patient gender M race W age 43 marital status S birthplace Missouri source 1930 census

Tyler, Flora C.
patient race: W sex: F age: 59 marital:M place of birth: New York occupation: none source: 1920 census

Tyson, Henry G.
Aspen Weekly Times 8-17-1889 – The Insane Dodge.  Denver, Aug. 14.- The attorneys for Henry Tyson, sentenced to be hanged during the third week of August, to-day called the attention of Governor Cooper to chapter 25, section 12, criminal code, general statutes, which relates to the execution of an insane person.  The governor has referred the matter to the attorney general for his opinion and, in all probability, the governor will, to-morrow, issue a stay of proceedings in the case.

Tyson, Henry G.
Aspen Weekly Chronicle 8-19-1889 – Tyson's Insanity Saves Him – Special to The Chronicle – Denver, Colo., Aug. 14. – Tyson's attorneys have made the discovery in chapter 25, section 12, of the criminal code, that a person who becomes a lunatic after committing a crime ought not to be tried during the continuance of his insanity, but if after the verdict and before judgment is rendered no judgment should be passed during the continuance of the insanity, but if after judgment he becomes insane execution ought to be stayed until his recovery. In all these cases it is the duty of the court to instruct the jury to try the accused for insanity. The attention of the governor was called this afternoon to the statute, and he said he had changed his intentions and was about decided not to interfere, but the clause caused him to refer the matter to the attorney general for an opinion. Warden Lamping has written to the governor certifying the opinion that Tyson is insane. Attorney General Jones' opinion is expected to-morrow. Tyson's attorneys are confident of a new trial and an acquittal.

Tyson, Henry G.
Aspen Weekly Times 12-14-1889 – Tyson Declared Insane – Denver, Dec. 13 - The jury which, for several days, has been investigating the sanity of Henry Tyson, this evening returned a verdict that the prisoner is insane.  It will be remembered that Tyson was recently convicted of the murder of Jas. King and sentenced to be executed in the third week of the present month.  The verdict rendered to-day will save his neck, but he will have to spend the remainder of his days in prison.

Tyson, Henry G.
Castle Rock Journal 12-18-1889 – Tyson, the murderer who was to have been hung at Canon City last week, has at last been pronounced insane.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 7-23-1889 – Tyson's Last Hope – A New Trial the Only Avenue of Possible Escape Open to the Convicted Murderer – Lengthy Arguments to Show That Court, Jury, and Attorney Conspired to Put His Neck in a Noose – More Talk of the Same Nature Will Be Poured Into the Ears of the Judge This Morning – Arguments for a new trial in the case of Henry Tyson, convicted of the murder of John King, were yesterday heard before Judge Allen. Mr. Brierly appeared on behalf of the accused and Assistant District Attorney Tom Ward resisted the motion for the state. Mr. Brierly's address occupied the greater part of the day. Tyson was present during the day in charge of a bailiff. He still wears the same woe-be-gone appearance, which characterized him during the first trial. Counsel opened his statement by announcing that one of the main grounds of his application was founded on the fact that important evidence with regard to the insanity of the prisoner could have been produced at the trial, but was excluded owing to the hurry with which the case was brought into court. Many authorities held that such testimony, if not cumulative, should be regarded as a good foundation for a new trial. As a second ground for his motion counsel asserted that the allowing of Mrs. Tyson to testify in the case was illegal and contrary to all state precedents which recognized civil marriage as a bar to a wife testifying against her husband. During the ten years for which the parties had lived together Mrs. Tyson had gone by that name, and even after the killing of King she had stated to a bailiff who brought her a subpoena that she was Mrs. Tyson. It was only after the time she had made up her mind for revenge that she repudiated the name. Various English chancellors held that the living together and bearing of children was prima facie evidence of marriage. Didn't Have Their Rights – Counsel also argued that the defense should have been permitted to produce testimony in contradiction of that given by Mrs. Tyson. The presumption was that a prisoner was innocent until he was found guilty, and on that general ground if no other the impeachment of Mrs. Tyson's testimony should have been allowed. The essence of all contracts depended on the concurrence of the parties. Mr. and Mrs. Tyson had lived and cohabited together after the legal presumption had arisen that her husband was dead, and the inference followed that they had agreed to live together as husband and wife. The testimony all pointed to the fact that the woman was not living with Tyson as a prostitute. The evidence the defense wished to produce with regard to the marriage was all fact and as such was matter for the consideration of the jury and as such should have gone before them. Counsel then took up the dying declaration of King and argued that it was not made in the form authorized by law. In the same connection counsel stated that the testimony of Mrs. Tyson and Mrs. Graybell with regard to King's ante-mortem statements were wrongly admitted. The proper foundation had not been laid for the declaration. King, too, had made no disposition of his property or called his friends together or given any evidence that he knew he was going to die, other than that he stated to the state's witnesses that he could not live. The declaration was made at the investigation of Mr. Palmer and other officers, who wanted all the evidence they could get. Their statements had a tendency to make King think he was going to die whether such was the case or not. Mr. Brierley's next objection was to the language used by District Attorney Stevens in his address to the jury to the effect that besides being a murderer, Tyson was also a thief. Counsel also quoted the following statements of Mr. Stevens made to the jury as unwarranted. Pretty Plain Talk – “1. The defendant is a liar, seducer, and a cold blooded murderer. 2. He is an adulterer, beyond question he is a seducer. 3. That besides being a liar, a seducer and murderer he is a thief. That defendant has been proved to be a liar and a perjurer. The people request a conviction at your hands. I believe the defendant is guilty.” The action of the court allowing such statements to be made had prejudiced the jury, and if no other objection was taken, that feature of the case should be sufficient to give the defendant a new trial. Another objection was to the fact that testimony was admitted to prove the handwriting of a letter from Tyson to Mr. Johnson threatening “to do up the whole outfit,” which had not been introduced into the case. The evidence of George Pedley that Tyson had purchased poison in the name of King should have not been admitted except in rebuttal. Counsel went in to argue that the court had erred in instructing the jury that if they had a doubt as to defendant's sanity such a doubt should not work his acquittal. So soon as the defense had tendered testimony showing that the prisoner was insane the burden of proof was on the prosecution to prove that he was sane. Mr. Brierley wound up his arguments by producing an affidavit of Dr. Eskridge stating that Judge Allen, after a lengthy discussion in regard to Tyson's sanity, made the remark to defendant's counsel that certain testimony might be admitted in the following words: “Well, you may inquire. We can meet it.” Judge Allen – Now, Mr. Brierley, as an officer of this court and a fair man, do you think the court ever said anything of the kind? Mr. Brierley – I do, your honor. Mr. Wycoff made a remark to me about it at the time. The Court – Do the words appear in the stenographer's notes? You know his book is the official record. Mr. Brierley – No, the words do not appear there. Mr. Ward opened his arguments in reply at a late hour and asserted that he had never seen a motion for a new trial conducted with so much unfairness and animus (?) not only against the prosecution but also against the court. The attorneys on the other side had most unjustly intimated that a desire was indicated by the court that the jury should convict. It was claimed that testimony as to the insanity of Tyson could have been produced if more time were given. If such was the case why did not his lawyers apply for a continuation? They would certainly have been granted it. The defendant himself had been examined at length but not one word had been said by him about insanity or his family. The test of insanity was whether the defendant knew the difference between right and wrong, and Dr. Eskridge, their own witness had testified that Tyson was well aware of the enormity of his crime. Mr. Ward read from authorities to show that it was only a valid marriage that would forbid a wife from testifying against her husband. Mr. Ward will continue his arguments this morning.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 8-15-1889 – Tyson's Insanity – The Question Which Confronts Governor Cooper and Calls for a Special Court of Inquiry – Warden Lamping of the Penitentiary Stays the Executioner's Hand with a Sworn Declaration – At the Eleventh Hour Prisoner's Counsel Discover a Constitutional Provision that Compels a Reprieve – After considerable hesitation Governor Cooper has given ear to the public clamor against the execution of Henry Tyson, ere the mental condition of the murderer has been inquired into. Almost at the last moment the chief executive of the state has been brought face to face with a statute which, whatever his inclinations might be, leaves him no alternative but to reprieve the culprit and give him the chance which, if he is really insane, he is entitled to. The Colorado courts and juries have heretofore been more than lenient with the takers of human life, but this should not certainly afford any reason for instituting a reform and committing a judicial murder by hanging a man whose mind may be in a condition that renders him irresponsible for the crime he committed. An Inquiry De Lunatico – “Are there any new developments in the Tyson case?” asked a reporter for The News of the governor yesterday. “Yes sir. They seemed to have placed the case now in a position where I am compelled to take some action in the matter,” replied the governor. “Here is the statute governing the case as it now stands, which seems to call for some action on my part. I have just received the certificate of the warden of the penitentiary certifying the fact that Tyson is insane,” and the governor turned to section 700 of the criminal code of the state, which reads as follows bearing on this case: “If after judgment and before execution of the sentence, such person becomes a lunatic or insane, then in case the punishment becomes capital, the execution thereof shall be stayed until the recovery of such person from the insanity or lunacy. In all these cases it shall be the duty of the court to impanel a jury to try the question whether the accused be at the time of impaneling insane or lunatic.” To Be Reprieved – “I had not thought to do anything in this matter, but it now looks as if I would have to issue a reprieve in accordance with this statute. I have not yet done so and shall not until I consult the attorney general. The attorneys in this case have been endeavoring to have me take action under section 2583 of the code, but I cannot see that that section could in any sense apply to a person convicted of a capital offense, but the certificate of the warden that Tyson is insane puts the matter in a different light, and as I read the section first referred to I am compelled to take some action.” A call at the office of Wycoff & Brierley, attorneys for Tyson, revealed the fact that Mr. Brierley is now and for some time past has been in Canon City looking after the interests of their client. “Yes,” said Mr. Wycoff in answer to an inquiry from a reporter for The News, “We have the strongest hopes of securing a reprieve for Tyson, as he is undoubtedly insane. Everybody who has come in contact with him since his removal to the penitentiary is fully convinced of that fact, and I have been as firmly convinced of the fact, even before and during his trial, that he was decidedly of unsound mind.” Method of Proceeding – “How will you proceed after a reprieve is granted by the governor, to inquire into the allegation of insanity?” “The judge issuing a writ of habeas corpus will bring the body of Tyson before him, and proceed to impanel a jury whose duty it will be to hear testimony, as in any civil case, and determine the question of his alleged insanty.” “Will you make any effort to push the case on its merits before the supreme court?” “Certainly we shall. I am of the settled conviction that the case will be reversed – in fact the record is as full of holes as a sieve. In the first place, all known principles of law were violated by allowing this woman – who in all good morals and sound law was proven to be the wife of Tyson – to testify against him. The matter which we complain of relative to the charge of the judge on the question of insanity is good ground for reversal and it seems like an intervention of Providence, which will permit us to carry the case to the supreme court. It was clearly the duty of the presiding judge to order a transcript made so that it might go before the supreme court, whereas in this case the defendant could not pay $350 for the transcript. It has been done in this state, but Judge Allen refused and still refuses to order it, and Tyson can no more raise $350 than he can break out of the penitentiary and free himself. We were looking for action by the governor to-day, but have not yet heard of the reprieve being issued, but it doubtless will be to-morrow.”

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 10-16-1889 – Courts and Clients – The Tyson Case – Henry Tyson, the slayer of John King in May last, was led once more into the district court yesterday morning, his first reappearance since the day in June last when he was sentenced to hang by the neck until he was dead. This time the condemned man, now under reprieve, appeared as a problematical lunatic, and his attorneys who have fought his case throughout appeared with him to make the last struggle to save the wretched man's neck from the noose. Tyson's appearance as he was led tottering into the court room by a deputy sheriff was a most miserable one. During the period of his confinement since last seen by the public, he has become, apparently feeble and worn. His face is wan, pale and sunken, while the extreme disorder of his toilet and attire gave him a most thoroughly woe-be-gone look. So extremely untidy and almost repulsive was Tyson's appearance that it gave rise to a reasonable suspicion of a certain amount of “make-up.” His beard had been allowed to straggle out uncropped for at least a week; his hair stood out in every direction in the most unkempt and frowsy manner, and around his neck was draped a kerchief which had evidently seen hard usage in unclean places. Tyson sank down in his chair with a vacant, pitiful look, and employed himself in looking listlessly out of the window and picking at his hands. Occasionally, when one attorney or the other would make a good point one could fancy a gleam of intelligence in his eyes, and there was certainly an unmistakeable start of the head as if of a restrained impulse to look at the speaker. It was thought strange that the condemned man was not given more aid from his keepers to enable him to present a somewhat tidy and cleanly appearance in the court-room. His dirtiness is inexcusable on any plea of insanity. The selection of the jury was accomplished with little difficulty. District Attorney Stevens' ever recurring question was: “Would the fact that this defendant, into whose sanity you are to inquire, is condemned to death influence you in giving your verdict?” And Attorney Wykoff always countered with, “Would you allow expert testimony to take the place of your own judgment, or would you decide by the whole result of your own observation?” The state has a lot of expert testimony in reserve and the defense has little or none. Attorney Brierly stated the case of the defense. It was of a somewhat psychological tenor, dividing the mind into “intellect, sensibility and will,” etc., and taking the jury some distance into the realm of metaphysics. The chaplain, warden and deputy wardens at the penitentiary think Tyson insane, he said. He countered thus early one of the prospective strong points of the state, that Tyson's insanity is too multiform and incongruous to be genuine, but explaining that “insanity, like rheumatism, often shifts.” It might destroy one faculty and leave others intact. He concluded with a strong appeal to the sympathies of the jury by pointing to the forlorn and friendless condition of his client, immured in a solitary cell now for many months. Mr. Stevens was not sympathetic. He said to the jury that this man had for a long time most consistently and persistently put on a somewhat perfectly feigned aspect of insanity, but incredulity arose from the fact that he had feigned four different kinds of insanity most imcompatible and incongruous. Even should he be decided insane there was no law to send him to an insane asylum as the defense suggested, but the convict must lay in his cell as before until some special intervention of clemency was made in his favor. Or else he would be obliged to keep on trying him every time he was declared sane by some new authority. If Tyson's solitary incarceration was so pitiful and heart-breaking as depicted, it was curious that the warden and chaplain had spent so much time with him as to be able to come down and testify that the man was certainly insane, as the result of their close and constant observation. The court adjourned until 9 o'clock this morning, after Juror Shea, express messenger for the Denver and Rio Grande, had excitedly risen in the box and declared: “I thought this thing was only going to last half an hour or so. I wouldn't have come if I had known I had to stay all night. The court quieted the juror's pangs by saying soothingly: “Well! I guess you won't have to stay all night.”

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 10-17-1889 – Cries Like a Baby – Tyson Bursts into Floods of Tears Whenever His Wife is Mentioned in His Hearing – Penitentiary Officials Give Evidence Showing They Believe Him at Least Partly Insane – Testimony of Medical Experts Tends Rather Strongly to Corroborate the Same Opinion – The investigation as to the mental soundness or unsoundness of Henry Tyson was continued yesterday before Judge Rucker and a jury in the first division of the district court. As before the condemned murderer presented either a real or feigned absence of all interest in his surroundings. Fidgetting about in his chair from one position to another, he did not appear to be influenced by anything except the orders of the burly bailiff, who sat by his side throughout the day. District Attorney Stevens and his assistant, Mr. Ward, and Messrs. Wycoff and Brierly appeared for Tyson. Judge Dudley, formerly county judge of Fremont, but now deputy warden at the penitentiary, was the first witness called. He stated that he had seen Tyson nearly every day and conversed with him while in Canon City. He did not know his attorneys' names, and had forgotten the names of the states where his friends lived. On one occasion a dog followed witness into the cell, when Tyson raised a tremendous howl. He said he was dying by inches and talked of flying up the chimney. From these and other of Tyson's peculiar ways, he concluded he was insane. Mr. Ward – This opinion that you have now, was that formed of what you have seen of Tyson or from what you have heard other people say? Witness – From my own observation. Mr. Ward – What do you mean by unsound mind? Dudley – I think he cannot take care of himself. My opinion when I first saw him was that he is a sort of an imbecile. I hold the same opinion still. The Chaplain's Observations – Dr. Hall, chaplain of the penitentiary, took the stand. He had in the course of his duties come in frequent contact with Tyson. On his first visit he asked him if he believed in God, and he replied he did. Questioned as to his former life, his home, etc., he replied that his mind was like water on the ground, he couldn't gather it up. On a second interview I noticed a sore on his hand and on inquiry he told me he had bit it. When I asked him about his wife he would always burst out in tears. I also asked him about his child, and where she was. He replied that she was with his sister, but he could not think of the name of the place. He told me that one night a great crowd of men came into his cell. Another morning he said he had been out all over town, that he had been flying with wings. Again he told me he had found the place where he was going. Asked him where it was and he replied, it is a hole in the ground. He has often spoken of his head and he complained that visions seemed always to be dancing before him at night. The last three weeks he was in the penitentiary Tyson would not wear a shirt or coat or vest. I asked him was he not cold to which he replied no. The scar on his hand he told me he had made to take his mind from other griefs. On visiting him a week ago he told me he had been out the night before. Said he had gone out through the bars. Told me he sometimes went out that way and sometimes through the ventilator. He jumped up on the bed and called “Hello,” several times through the ventilator, but got down again, saying he couldn't make them hear. He attributed the pains in his head to the fact that he stood beside a cannon once when it was fired and his head had never felt right since. He stated to me on several occasions that he wanted to get out and work. I asked him if he remembered the sentence of the court against him. He replied no, that he only recollected he had been ordered to leave Denver in twenty-four hours. When the reprieve was granted I read it over to him and explained it to him, telling him it was only a suspension, and that he should try to fix his mind on God and depend on his mercy. Two days afterward he told me he had destroyed the reprieve. Convinced of His Insanity – Counsel – Now, doctor, have you formed any opinion as to the sanity or insanity of Tyson. Yes. “On what do you base that opinion?” From the facts as I have related them. I think he is not sane. Cross-examined by Mr. Ward. I was impressed with the idea that there was something wrong the first day I saw Tyson. I noticed a great change in him from the time he came till he left. He kept getting worse. It was after the reprieve that he began to go naked and see visions. My opinion that he was of unsound mind was greatly strengthened after the reprieve. “Is it a fact, doctor, that he began to quit praying after the reprieve?” “I cannot say exactly.” “Did he begin to walk a little different after the reprieve?” “He appeared to be getting weaker.” “When you say he is unsound do you say he is incapable of distinguishing between right and wrong?” “That I could not say.” Mr. Ward – Then, your honor, I ask that this witness' testimony be stricken from the record, as this question of right and wrong is the test in the case. The motion was denied. Medical Examination – During the noon hour Tyson was privately examined by Dr. Eskridge at his office. With the view of gaining some better evidence as to the condition of the man a News reporter was present by permission. A part of the dialogue is here given: Dr. Eskridge – Now, Tyson, you must tell me why you think you are crazy. “Crazy? I don't understand. Do you mean jump around and yell. I'm not that way.” “Do you know where you are?” “Yes; I'm in town.” “What town?” “I don't know the name of it.” “Do you know your name?” “Yes, sir. Tyson. Everybody calls me Tyson.” “Nothing else?” “That's all the name I've got.” “What did your wife call you?” Here Tyson burst out in a violent fit of weeping and begged the doctor not to refer to her. “Were you very fond of her?” “Yes, I liked her.” “Was she a good woman?” “No; she wasn't the right kind of a woman.” “Where is she now?” “Oh, she's dead. They took her away.” “Who took her?” “The devil, he got her.” “Did you ever try to get her back?” “Yes, I asked the devil to let her away.” “And what did he reply?” “He told me he couldn't do it, that I was too late.” “Now Tyson, you know I want to do all I can for you, why can't you tell me straightforward and like a man why you killed King?” “I never killed anybody.” At this juncture the doctor began arranging some of his instruments with the view of testing Tyson's temperature, etc. “What, are you going to kill me now?” queried the condemned man with a scared look. “Yes, are you ready to die?” “No, I don't want to die at all. I want to see my little girl – that's what I want.” On the resumption of the hearing at 2 o'clock the testimony of Dr. Bradbury, of Canon City was read. He stated that Tyson's intellect was feeble and that he could not direct the operation of his mind except to a very little extent. He seemed to have but little power to bring up past events and the faculty to compare events was also feeble. His will power and his memory were very limited. The doctor gave it as his opinion that Tyson's symptoms could not be feigned. The written testimony of Dr. D. C. Gray, M. D., Canon City, was also read. It was virtually to the same effect as that of Dr. Bradbury. Dr. Clarke, of Denver, testified that he visited the jail and conversed with Tyson. He called witness his boss and said he was a good one. He examined him physically and found him very feeble. He did not make any replies to the questions asked him. He seemed not to recognize witness. He complained that his head did not feel right – that it was stuffed full. Witness gave it as his opinion that Tyson was of unsound mind. Cross-examined: “I never treated any insane patients.” “Do you think Tyson can distinguish between right and wrong?” “Well, yes. He is an imbecile. I never examined any imbeciles, but I am still prepared to say that Tyson is one.” The doctor was further cross-examined and disclosed a very considerable ignorance of the true meaning of the word “imbecile.” Dr. Cline was called and testified to the irregularities of Tyson's thoughts and the wildness in his eyes. The latter were congested. His evidence was warmly corroborative of that given by the other doctors.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 12-4-1889 – A Reprieve Probable – “I have no doubt but that Governor Cooper will issue another reprieve for the condemned man Tyson, if that should be necessary, until the fact is determined by a jury as to whether he is insane or not,” said Henry Riddle of the attorney general's office to a reporter for The News yesterday. “At the time the question of Tyson's sanity was first raised and the governor felt from a sense of duty that he should issue a reprieve in order that a jury might be called to pass upon the prisoner's condition, I advised him that it was the only proper step to take and should he call upon me again my advice would be the same. It makes not the slightest difference in the world what this or that expert may decide the fact remains that a jury has heard the evidence on this question and disagreed and this certainly raises a legal doubt of his sanity. Were I in the governor's place I should issue reprieves until doomsday before I would consent to have a man hanged under these circumstances. Neither can any other form be now advisedly selected than that of trial by jury as to this fact. It is a question which should constantly be determined by a jury.” The murderer of John King continues to act in an insane manner and his attorneys have decided to have his mental condition judicially inquired into once more. The hearing will take place on December 9. At the last inquiry the jury failed to agree on a verdict.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 12-13-1889 – The Tyson Investigation – The further investigation into the mental condition of Henry Tyson, the convicted murderer, was held yesterday, when Drs. Eskridge, J. H. Kimball, S. A. Fisk and H. W. McLauthlin testified that although not strong mentally Tyson was a sane man in the ordinary acceptation of the term. Dr. Eskridge was especially pronounced in his opinion that the condemned man is only making a clumsy effort to feign insanity. The medico claims that Tyson's symptoms and actions are of a nature to be found in four different forms of insanity, but incompatible with any one of them. Drs. Gray, Clarke, Kline and P. D. Rothwell were just as pronounced in declaring Tyson a lunatic of the first water. Leonard Dill, who was foreman of the jury that convicted Tyson, testified that at the trial the defendant gave his residence in a perfectly rational way. All the testimony was completed last evening, and the investigation will probably conclude this morning.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 12-14-1889 – The jury having found Tyson to be an insane person, the law of this state requires that he shall be treated as such and the verdict operates as a suspension of the sentence condemning him to death so long as the insanity continues. His inducement for recovery is a trip to the gallows.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 12-14-1889 – Tyson Declared Insane – The trial regarding the mental condition of murderer Henry Tyson was yesterday concluded with a verdict to the effect that the convicted man is insane. Under this decision Tyson will be taken from the penitentiary and consigned to the state insane asylum until such time as he may recover his reason. In the latter event the law provides that the death sentence shall be carried out, but in view of all the circumstances it is probable that Tyson will be allowed to die a natural death. The verdict of the jury is notable for the fact that the testimony of the lunacy experts that Tyson was shamming insanity has been altogether ignored and the hard and fast rules which they attached to the various forms of insanity utterly disregarded. When the verdict was announced Tyson, to all appearances, did not seem to appreciate its momentous significance to him. He continued staring into vacancy and seemed to be devoting all his attention to a thread of his coat that had escaped from its moorings. The crime for which Tyson was sentenced to hang was the shooting of John King, in the month of May last. The affair arose more or less out of jealousy aroused through King's alleged intimacy with Tyson's paramour.

Tyson, Henry G.
Central City Weekly Register-Call 12-20-1889 – His Neck Safe – Henry Tyson, condemned for the murder of John King on the night of May 21, 1889, in Denver, has been adjudged insane. He was to have been hung next week. The court ordered the sheriff of Arapahoe county to remand him back to the warden of the state penitentiary at Canon City, where he is to remain for treatment.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 12-22-1889 – Occupants of Cells – Familiar Criminals as They Appear in the Cramped Quarters of Arapahoe County Jail – “Yes, siree, there's many a funny thing about jail life that the public don't know anything about,” said the veteran jailer, Tom Hutchinson, better known as “old Hutch,” to a News reporter yesterday… (About the Arapahoe County jail) “Oh! We have been getting along nicely – no overcrowding and a fairly well behaved crowd, take 'em all round… Want to take a turn through and see the boys?”… (The reporter) has scarcely entered the prison… Attention was next drawn to a bundle of humanity crouched in a corner and presenting a most deplorable appearance. This was none other than Henry Tyson, the murderer who has saved his neck by losing his mind. The jury that tried him declared him insane and Tyson is filling the bill in a most complete and commendable way. “Think that fellow is shamming?” was asked of one of the jailers. “Yes, certainly he's shamming. He is a great big coward and that's all there is the matter with him. I have been keeping a pretty close eye on Tyson right along, and I can tell you there is nothing of the lunatic about him. He has bamboozled the jury though, and I don't think there is any one cares much whether he hangs or not.” “What's become of the woman who caused all the trouble?” “Oh, she's around town keeping a boarding house. I would hate to live with her.”

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 12-5-1890 – Wants His Liberty – Tyson Dodged the Gallows and Now Asks to Leave the Insane Prison – Henry Tyson, who was convicted of murder in the first degree in 1886, through his counsel yesterday applied to Judge Decker in the criminal division of the district court for a writ of habeas corpus, directing the production of his body in court. Tyson wants to be free. He has had two trials and is now an inmate of the insane division of the jail at Canon City. He was found guilty of murder in the first degree at the first trial and sentenced to be hanged. Governor Cooper granted him a reprieve of sixty days in order that his mental condition might be inquired into. He was finally declared to be insane and the supreme court decided that he could not be executed. Tyson now claims to be sane and wants to be discharged a free man. Judge Decker promised to look into the case before he would decide whether he would grant the writ or not.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 2-14-1895 – Tyson Would Be Free – The Opportunity Opened by Changes in the Law – Has Recovered His Reason – His Attorney Will Endeavor to Have Him Officially Declared Sane and Will Then Ask His Release on the Ground That He Was Convicted Under an Ex Post Facto Law – History of the Case – Other Murderers Convicted at the Same Time as Tyson Were Released on Technical Grounds – Efforts are being made to secure the release of Henry Tyson, the murderer now confined in the penitentiary at Canon City. After having been sentenced to hang Tyson secured a trial as to his mental condition. He was declared insane by a jury in the county court and was remanded to the penitentiary. The court ordered that “execution under the original judgment of court be stayed until said Henry Tyson should have recovered from his insanity.” Nathan P. Tanquary, attorney for Tyson, will now attempt to prove that his client is not insane at present and has not been during the past year. In a petition presented in the West Side court yesterday Attorney Tanquary claims that Tyson is now sane. In support of this statement the affidavit of Dr. J. T. Eskridge is added to the petition. Dr. Eskridge states that he examined Tyson on February 8, this year, and that he believes Tyson to be sane. The petition prays that Tyson be given an official examination as to his mental condition. The hearing of the argument upon the petition was set for February 23. If Tyson is declared sane by a jury his attorney will demand his release from custody on the ground that the prisoner was convicted under an ex post facto law. Since Tyson's conviction it is claimed that the law relating to murder has been materially changed; that when sentence was passed the statutes provided that murderers be confined in the county jail and there hanged. Now the law is that persons found guilty of murder in the first degree shall be taken to the penitentiary. Many other technical points will be advanced to argue in behalf of Tyson's liberty. Tyson has applied for a pardon, but his petition has been denied. Rather than remain behind the bars, he has taken chances to get entirely free. Tyson fatally shot John King on the night of January 18, 1889, at 207 West Twelfth avenue. King was foreman of a gang of bridge builders on the Denver, Texas and Gulf railroad. He boarded at the Tyson home and Tyson suspected that his wife was unfaithful to him. On the night of the shooting the men met in the back yard and Tyson shot King in the back. In a dying statement King said that Tyson had handed him a bill for 75 cents. King claimed that his refusal to pay the bill caused the shooting. On July 20 Tyson was sentenced to be hanged some time during the third week of August 1889. It is a strange fact that James Savage, James Medley and Robert Holmes, who committed brutal murders during the same month when Tyson killed King, were all released from the penitentiary upon technical grounds. The result of the present proceeding is awaited with much curiosity by the legal fraternity.

Tyson, Henry G.
Denver Evening Post 3-2-1895 – Criminal Court Happenings – Henry Tyson Wants to Be Declared Insane (Sane) – In the Criminal court this morning the attorneys for Henry Tyson submitted an application for an examination as to his sanity. Several years ago Tyson was convicted of murder, but was proved to be insane. He has been in confinement over since, and now an attempt will be made to get him free.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 3-11-1895 – Tyson in Denver – Henry Tyson, convicted of murder and afterwards declared insane, was brought up from Canon City last night by Deputy Sheriff Tom Clarke. He has been granted a new hearing as to his sanity. Hence his arrival in Denver.

Tyson, Henry G.
Denver Evening Post 3-11-1895 – Tyson is Back – Henry Tyson, who was convicted of murder several years ago and who was sentenced to life imprisonment, was brought back to the county jail late last night for an examination as to his sanity. At the jail he did not appear to be of sound mind. To a few questions he replied in unintelligible mutterings.

Tyson, Henry G.
Denver Evening Post 3-15-1895 – Worse Than Siberia – The Awful Punishment Inflicted on Henry Tyson – Alone for Three Years – The Unfortunate Man Who Was Sentenced for Murdering His Wife Was Kept in a Dark Cell During Many Years of His Confinement – He Lost His Sense of Hearing, Smelling and Sight – He May Be Set Free – A story of punishment so terrible that it brought tears to the eyes of the jury and the court was heard in the criminal court this morning. Henry Tyson, a convicted murderer, was on trial as to his sanity. He was convicted in 1889 and sentenced to be hung but afterward was adjudged insane and placed in solitary confinement. In describing his confinement at Canon City on the stand, he said: “In June, 1889, I was placed in a solitary cell; it was a very small one and I was never out of that cell for three years. At first it was terrible. I did not talk to a single person and I never cared to read and don't know whether they would have let me if I had wanted to. The place was dark and my eyes pained me and after a time I gradually lost my sight until I could not see at all, not even my hands in front of me. There was not much room for exercise and my legs got so stiff I could not walk. I don't know how long I had been confined then. One day was the same as another; I either sat on my cot or laid on the floor all of the time. Before I was let out I had lost my hearing; my eyes were swelled and I could not stand on my feet. I had no idea how the time passed and seldom if ever said a single word. Now I don't know whether I could read or not. When Warden McLister came, June, 1892, he ordered that I be let out of the cell for exercise. Two convicts came to my cell and lifted me up and, one on each side, carried me up and down the corridor; they did this for two hours every day and after a while I found that I could use my limbs again and gradually my eyes got accustomed to the strong light and I could see a little. Now I can walk fairly well and see some but yet I can't hear plain. On the examination he said that he had not heard from his relatives during the five years of his confinement and did not know whether his mother was alive or not; his father died before he was imprisoned. Dr. Eskridge testified that he examined Tyson yesterday and found him to be of sane mind; he was well physically and his faculties of hearing and seeing and walking would be fully restored after had had exercise; his long confinement had made him accumulate an abundance of fat. The jury, after being out but a few minutes, found that Tyson was now sane. At 2 o'clock his attorneys applied for his discharge and the motion will be heard later. Since Tyson was brought back from the penitentiary he has refused to talk, spending his days in jail in perfect silence. This morning was the first time that he has loosened his tongue. After he had left the stand he relapsed into the same moody silence and all endeavors to converse with him were futile. Tyson's crime was committed on the evening of May 18, 1889. He shot John King, a railroad employe. Jealousy was the motive. He had deserted his wife and after several months had come back to find her, and she was on intimate terms with King, who was a boarder at her house. He quarreled with his wife and left her again. Mrs. Tyson moved to 207 West Twelfth street and King accompanied her. On the night of the murder Tyson came back to town. He proceeded directly to his wife's house and, Enoch Arden-like, he watched through the window. He saw that his wife and King were happy together. Presently they both came out of the back door to the pump in the yard to get a pail of water. He watched the pair return to the house and just as Mrs. Tyson stepped over the threshold of the door he crept from his ambush and shot King through the back, the wound proving fatal. Tyson at once went to the depot and took a train out of town. He was, however, speedily captured and brought back for trial. He was convicted of murder and sentenced to be hanged by Judge Rucker. A month after he was brought back to court and adjudged insane. His attorney believes that he can now free his prisoner, as a man cannot be tried for the same offense but once, and the laws are so changed since Tyson was convicted that he could not be sentenced to hang under the former conviction.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 3-16-1895 – Years in an Iron Box – Terrible Experience of Henry Tyson – The galleys at Toulon, France, where Jean Valjean spent nineteen years during the early part of the present century, as described in “Les Miserables,” has its double in the Colorado state penitentiary, according to the story of Henry Tyson. Sitting in the witness chair at the West Side court yesterday, Tyson, once convicted and sentenced to hang, then declared insane, told a story of a death in life that he endured for three long years. Tyson was given a hearing yesterday as to his sanity. He was beneath the shadow of the gibbet five years ago when he was declared guilty of the murder of John King, but before the fatal week had arrived he was granted a hearing as to the condition of his mind. A jury declared him insane and he was returned to the penitentiary by order of the court until “such time as he recovered his reason,” then the original sentence to be carried into effect. For three years the miserable man was confined in a cell, allowed to see or talk with no one. Three Years in a Cell – “I was never out of that cell for three years,” said that man yesterday. His face and hands were the color of earth and his speech came in faltering tones. The three years in an iron box had taken the color from his skin and the expression from his eyes. “At first it was terrible,” he said. “I could not talk to anyone and I didn't read. The cell was dark and my eyes began to pain me. After a time I lost my sight so that I couldn't see my hands even if I put them up before me.” He told how his hearing gradually left, and how he was tortured with the thought that he must remain there until his soul passed from his body. His joints became stiff and he could not walk. His hands and knees became swollen and finally all that he could do was to lie down upon his cot, the horror of his situation gradually dissipating itself, all hope being lost. Breaking in of Light – But a light burst upon his darkened soul when Warden McLister assumed charge in June, 1892. The warden made an order that he be allowed exercise, and the boon was one that he was hardly able to believe. Two convicts were detailed each day to exercise him, and for some time they were compelled to lift him from his cot and bear him between them up and down the long corridors. Gradually the tortured man regained his senses, his eyesight returned, and finally he could distinguish sounds. Dr. Eskridge testified that he was of the opinion that Tyson was in possession of his right mind. After deliberating ten minutes the jury declared Tyson sane. Nathan P. Tanquary, attorney for the prisoner, filed a motion for his discharge from custody, claiming that the prisoner was convicted under an ex post facto law. The motion was set for hearing to-day, when the fate of Tyson will probably be decided.

Tyson, Henry G.
Denver Evening Post 3-19-1895 – Sentenced to Death – Henry Tyson Must Pay the Penalty of His Crime on the Gallows – Henry Tyson was sentenced to be hanged during the second week in April in the criminal court this morning. The prisoner listened to his death warrant with the same stolid expression and lack of interest that has marked his demeanor during the argument of his case. Until the reading of the decision he apparently was the most disinterested spectator in the court room. As the sentence was read he watched the court intently, but farther than that did not display emotion. After the ordeal was over he quietly reached for his hat and got up from his chair and walked back to the jail with the sheriff without saying a word to anyone or showing a tremor in his face or walk. The sentence was the result of a motion that Tyson be discharged from the custody for the reason that since he has been adjudged sane the laws under which he was sentenced to be hanged in the year 1889 have been so changed that the sentence of that court could not now be legally carried out, and he could not be again tried for the same offense for which he was once convicted. Judge Butler decided that the motion was not sufficient grounds why the former sentence should not be carried out, now that Tyson had been found sane, and so ordered that he be hanged. His attorneys say that they will take the case to the supreme court of the United States. The death sentence read as follows: “Wherefore, it is ordered by the court that the sheriff of Arapahoe county take the body of Henry Tyson and him keep safely, convey and deliver to the warden of the penitentiary of the state of Colorado within twenty-four hours hereof, to be kept by said warden until the second week of April, A. D. 1895, and that the said warden shall upon a day and hour in the second week of April to be designated by him, execute the sentence of this court of July 26, 1889.” The former sentence was that Tyson be hanged until he was dead. Shortly after sentence was pronounced Tyson was found to be insane by a jury in the criminal court at that time. He was then taken back to Canon City and the story of his solitary confinement and terrible suffering was told on the witness stand a few days ago and fully published in “The Evening Post.” He was advised by his attorneys that there was a chance of getting him free but that he would run the risk of being hanged if their plans should fail. Upon this advice he decided to stand trial as to his sanity and after being proved sane run the risk of getting free by habeas corpus. His attorneys relied upon a decision in the United States court in which a man was sentenced to death and the execution for some reason delayed until the legislature had made several material changes in the laws relative to the trial of murder. They then held that he could not be executed for the reason that with different laws the result of his trial might have been different. Judge Butler held that the laws of our state had not been changed so materially as to effect the sentence of the same court in the year 1889.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 3-21-1895 – Another Hope Gone – Supreme Court Refuses a Writ of Habeas Corpus for Tyson – The supreme court yesterday denied the application of N. O. Tanquary for a writ of habeas corpus in the case of Henry Tyson. The application was made for the purpose of receiving his discharge from capital sentence pronounced by the district court of this county. Tyson, it will be remembered, was sentenced to be hanged nearly five years ago. Then the question of sanity was raised, and for three years, he claims, he was subjected to solitary confinement. Last week a jury in the district court declared him sane, and Tuesday he was sentenced to be hanged during the second week in April. He was taken to the penitentiary last night. In passing on the application for a writ of habeas corpus the supreme court had no time to render a written opinion, but directed Clerk James A. Miller to inform Tyson's attorney, that it was refused. The court saw no reason for issuing a writ of habeas corpus, stating that the only resort of plaintiff was a writ of error. The story of Tyson, the condemned murderer, that he was confined three years in a dark cell at Canon City is pronounced a hoax by citizens of Canon City, who often visited the penitentiary and saw Tyson in the institution. Ex-Warden Bill Smith said last night: “I saw the story which Tyson told, but paid no attention to it, as it appeared too big a fabrication for any sensible person to believe. Tyson was confined in the cell house and had the opportunity of taking exercise if he wanted it. He was too stubborn to ask for any privileges and pretended to be insane. His cell was one of the best lighted cells in the penitentiary.” Tyson was not allowed to go to the dining room with other prisoners and was not permitted to work on the “ditch.”

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 4-2-1895 – Supersedeas For Tyson – Sentence Deferred Until After Another Hearing in Court – Henry Tyson, in the Canon City penitentiary, under sentence to be hanged during the second week of the present month, has one more chance of life. After both the supreme and United States courts had refused to issue a writ of habeas corpus, his attorney yesterday took a writ of supersedeas issued which will stay the execution until the court passes upon the case. Tyson, when first sentenced to be hanged, escaped through being declared insane. He was treated for insanity, his reason pronounced restored, and last month he was again arraigned and sentenced to death.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 4-13-1895 – Tyson's Life Saved – He Cannot Be Tried a Second Time for Murder – Attorney General Carr yesterday filed with the clerk of the supreme court, in the case of Henry Tyson, plaintiff in error, vs. the people, a confession of errors assigned by plaintiff in error and consenting that the cause may be reversed. If this is allowed by the supreme court, as it doubtless will, it will probably result in Tyson's discharge under the indictment. He cannot be tried for murder in the first degree in face of the decision of the United State supreme court in the Medley-Savage case, which mades the act under which he was tried ex post facto. He might possibly be tried for manslaughter. The chances are, however, that Tyson will go unwhipped of justice. The crime, the murder of King, occurred seven years ago in Denver. He was sentenced to be hanged in 1889, but a commission was appointed and he was declared insane. Last month he was declared sane and the sentence of death was ordered executed. The supreme court has twice refused a writ of habeas corpus in the case. Then a writ of error was sued out and a supersedeas granted.

Tyson, Henry G.
Denver Evening Post 8-31-1895 – Henry Tyson is Free – The Murderer Set at Liberty in Court To-Day – His Awful Confinement – Sabbath morning will chronicle the freedom of Murderer Henry Tyson and the end of one of the most famous criminal cases in the history of the courts of Colorado. In the old West Side court room this morning Tyson was arraigned before Judge Johnson and allowed to plead guilty to involuntary manslaughter. The sentence was one day in the county jail. Not five months ago Tyson stood before the same bar and Judge Butler pronounced the death sentence. The supreme court reversed this decision and sent the case back to the district court. The district attorney was at a loss how to act in the case. Tyson could not be tried twice for the same offense and the supreme court, by its decision, held that Tyson could not be hanged under the first sentence. The case stood in this way. Seven years ago Tyson was sentenced to death by Judge Burns, a month later he was found insane by the same court, and the death sentence commuted to life imprisonment. He lay in Canon City penitentiary until this year, and then his attorney, N. Q. Tanquary, discovered a means by which he believed that he could free him. Tyson was brought to Denver and again tried as to his sanity, and this time found sane. Tanquary immediately applied for his release on the ground that the law under which Tyson's first trial and sentence was had had been changed. For instance, the first sentence was that he should be hanged at the Arapahoe county jail and the present law makes the execution of the death penalty only legal at Canon City. The attorney therefore contended that Tyson could not be re-sentenced on the facts at the first trial and could not be tried twice for the same offense. Judge Butler did not look at the case in this light and resentenced Tyson to hang during the second week of April this year. As stated above the supreme court sent the case back to the district court. This placed the district judge in a quandary and he did nothing about the case until this morning when Tanquary offered to allow Tyson to plead guilty to involuntary manslaughter and the plea was accepted. The story of Henry Tyson's crime and his solitary prison life is one of strange interest. Tyson came to Denver from Illinois back in the '80s. He and his wife did not live happily together. A boarder at their home named John King was the cause of much of their trouble. Tyson was very jealous of him and left the city on several occasions. During one of these periods of desertion Mrs. Tyson moved to West Denver and John King continued to board with her. One night Tyson suddenly returned to Denver and walked directly to the house of his wife. He had procured a shotgun and concealed himself in some bushes at the rear of the house. Here he patiently waited until nearly dark when his vigil was rewarded by seeing King and his wife come out of the back door. They carried a pail between them and went to a pump in the yard to draw water. They filled the bucket and returned to the house chatting happily together. Mrs. Tyson crossed the doorstep and King stood on the threshold when Tyson stepped from his concealment and fired. King fell dead in the arms of Mrs. Tyson and Henry Tyson fled. He was captured and tried before Judge Burns. Public feeling ran very high and there was much talk of lynching. The case was the absorbing topic of conversation. He was speedily found guilty and sentenced to be hanged. Preparations for the execution were made when Tyson's attorneys brought the case back into court on a plea of insanity and the plea was successful. Tyson was taken to Canon City penitentiary and there placed in solitary confinement. Here he endured all of the tortures of a Siberian dungeon. In telling the story not long ago to a reporter for The Evening Post he said: “For three years I remained in that small cell. There was no room for exercise, no one to talk to, and nothing to do. I never was a reading man and did not care to read. I doubt if they would have allowed me a book had I asked for it. Day after day I lay in that cell. I lost all track of time, when the prison lights were lit I went to bed and when it was daylight I either sat on the edge of my cot or laid flat on my back on the cell floor. After a time I felt my eyes failing. They swelled until my face was twice as large as natural. My limbs also swelled until they were of horrible size and my body became bloated. I must have been in this cell two years when I found I could not walk. Then I lost all track of time or things. Then a new warden came to prison and found me in this shape, and ordered that my solitary confinement should cease. When they took me out of my cell I could neither talk or walk. For days two guards came to my cell and took hold, one of each arm, and walked me up and down the corridor. Gradually I found that I could step on my feet, and then I could see plainer. The warden was very kind to me and I got along nicely. I told him that I was not insane and they brought me here. You know the rest.” Tyson's conduct has been very peculiar since he came back from Canon City to the Arapahoe county jail. He has seldom spoken a word to any one, and even to-day, when the gates of freedom are only twenty-four hours' distant, he refuses absolutely to hold conversation with any one. This he accounted for in a moment of forgetfulness when he said that he got out of the habit of talking while in Canon City in solitary confinement.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 9-1-1895 – Raced With Grim Death – Henry G. Tyson Wins Life in the Final Heat – Between Lunacy and Scaffold – Six Years of Frightful Uncertainty, During Which a Prisoner Experienced the Utmost Horrors of Insanity, Starvation and Condemnation – Twice Sentenced to Death and Thrice Under Trial for Insanity – One Day in Jail on a Plea of Involuntary Manslaughter – After a six years' race with death Henry G. Tyson, who shot and killed John King, has at last escaped from a fate that seemed relentless and sure. To-day he is a free man. He was twice sentenced to be hanged and was tried three different times for insanity. For three long years he was confined in an iron cell alone and suffered horrible anguish mentally as well as physically. When, at length, he was taken from the darkened chamber he could not walk or see. His case stands foremost among murder cases in many features for it is seldom that a twice condemned homicide lives to associate with free people. The case of Tyson was called for hearing in the West side criminal court yesterday. A plea of involuntary manslaughter on the part of the defendant was accepted by Judge Johnson. Tyson was sentenced to serve one day in the county jail. Remarks of the Court – “Punishment in this case is now out of the question,” said Judge Johnson, when the prisoner was called to receive sentence. The imposing of a one day sentence in the case was simply a formal matter. When Tyson was returned to jail he was at once released but he returned and slept at the jail last night upon instructions from Jailer Weber. To Attorney N. Q. Tanquary is due credit for the successful issue of the long fought legal battle. Many times was the slayer of King beneath the shadow of the gallows but both the condemned man and his attorney never lost hope. There was every proof at the trial of Tyson that the act committed was pre-meditated. He killed King because he thought King had improper relations with Mrs. Tyson. The tragedy occurred in 1889 at a boarding house in West Denver conducted by Mrs. Tyson. Tyson was married in 1888, but owing to unhappy domestic relations between man and wife there were frequent separations. Tyson spent much of his time in Ohama, where he was engaged as clerk in a wholesale house. He was in this place when upon the wings of gossip word reached his ears that his wife was living with one John King at her Denver home. Without telling his intention to anyone he disguised himself and quietly slipped away one night and boarded a train for Denver. He armed himself with a large revolver before leaving. He had failed, however, to disguise himself in a manner that would not attract attention. He wore a new hat and overcoat and naturally was not able to appear as though he was used to his attire. The conductor and a brakeman, who later proved valuable witnesses, took particular notice of this particular passenger. Upon his arrival in Denver Tyson went to his wife's home, but did not enter. He concealed himself after dark in the back yard and awaited the appearance of King. He had not long to wait, for Mrs. Tyson and King came out together, King carrying a bucket. They were going to a pump for water and King never had a hint of the death that lurked so near. Shot in the Back – Tyson came forth and shot King in the back. The husband then fled and took a train for Omaha, returning before his absence was particularly noted. The detectives traced the crime to Tyson, who at first strenuously denied his guilt. The overcoat and hat with which he had disguised himself were found in his room and when he was dressed with these articles in court the conductor and brakeman already mentioned identified him positively as the man who came to Denver just before the killing. Other evidence clearly fixed the guilt upon Tyson and he was found guilty of murder in the first degree. Judge Allen sentenced him to be hanged. The condemned man was taken to the penitentiary, where he showed signs of being insane. It is said that Tyson swallowed candles and tobacco. By this means he induced a strange and uncanny appearance. The chaplain of the penitentiary interested himself and the attention of the governor was called to the case. Tyson was brought to Denver and tried before Judge Rising for insanity. At the first hearing the jury disagreed but at another trial Tyson was declared to be of unsound mind. This decision saved him from the gallows, but a punishment as great, if not greater, was in store for him. Shut Out from Light – He was taken to the penitentiary again and put into a dungeon cell shut out from the light of day. The unfortunate inmate for three long years spoke to no one, not being allowed the companionship of another human being. He could not exercise his limbs and consequently lost their use. It seems that he was left to die in solitude, and he would probably have been in the cell yet but for the efforts of C. F. Adams, a former employer, in his behalf. He secured the services of Attorney Tanquary at this stage of the case. The attorney visited Tyson and the latter said that he would rather stretch a rope than endure the agony of solitary confinement. Upon application of Tanquary Tyson was again tried for insanity. This trial occurred last year before Judge Butler and Tyson was declared sane. Judge Butler then resentenced the prisoner to the gallows the final act to take place during the second week of April this year. Attorney Tanquary after great difficulty secured an order from the supreme court of the state granting Tyson a new trial. This trial was the one set for yesterday. Tyson has grown prematurely old. His hair is gray and his face is ashy pale and somewhat sunken. His health is fairly good with the exception of a weakness in his legs due to his experience in the penitentiary. According to the jail officials he suffers frequently from delusions. A few days ago he told Jailer Weber that he went to Kansas City and stayed a week during the time he was in jail. He made other strange statements leading the officials to believe that his mind was really affected. To-night Tyson will leave for Kansas City. He has been engaged by the C. F. Adams company. His wife has left the city and it is not known where she is.

Tyson, Henry G.
Leadville Herald Democrat 8-15-1889 – Is Tyson Insane? – His Attorneys So Claim, and Will Likely Get a Stay of Execution – Denver, Aug. 14 – The attorneys for Henry Tyson, sentenced to be hanged the third week of August, to-day called the attention of Governor Cooper to chapter 25, section 12, criminal code, general statutes, which relates to the execution of an insane person. The governor has referred the matter to the attorney general for his opinion and in all probability the governor will to-morrow issue a stay of proceedings in the case.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 6-25-1889 – Insanity Alleged – Henry Tyson's Attorneys Bring the Theory of Insanity in Defense of Their Client – The trial of Henry Tyson for the murder of John King was yesterday resumed in the district court before Judge Allen. Although six days have been spent in unraveling the mysteries of the case, the interest of the public continues to assert itself in closely packed benches of eager listeners. The state having closed its case on Saturday evening, Mr. Wykoff yesterday opened with his testimony for the defense. The district attorney and his assistant, Mr. Ward, were in attendance. A Landlady Testifies – Mrs. W. F. Cole was the first witness called. She stated: I live in the next house to Mrs. Tyson on Twelfth street. Mr. King and Mrs. Tyson represented themselves as Mr. and Mrs. King and rented a room in my house. They lived there one week before I knew they weren't man and wife. They both occupied one room. I frequently heard Mr. King and Mrs. Tyson talking about the defendant. King said if Tyson ever interfered with Mrs. Tyson he would go for him with a hatchet. Cross-examined by Mr. Ward – Mr. and Mrs. King came together between 7 and 8 on Sunday morning, May 5. Mr. King never told me that Mrs. Tyson was his wife. On paying the second week's rent Mrs. Tyson told me that Mr. King was not her husband; that the latter's name was Tyson and that she expected him to come there and make trouble. She asked me if Mr. Tyson should come there to tell him that she was not in the house… Reference To Insanity – After a recess for lunch Mr. Van Scotten was called and testified – I met Tyson at Dr. Clark's office in April. The defendant appeared to be very excited and said he was in great trouble. He was looking very queer and acted strangely. He told me he had decided to have a complaint of lunacy made out against his wife. He told me his reasons for doing so, and I asked him why did he cling to such a woman? He replied: “I don't want any other wife whilst I live.” He said she was weak minded and under the influence of others; that she would get drunk and when she was in that state these people could do with her what they had a mind to. He talked of getting her away from the people she was with. I told him the best place for such a woman was the lunatic asylum. Subsequently I came to the county court with Tyson. I there drew out the proper papers to ground the case on lunacy but Tyson refused to sign them. We then went to the county attorney's office where they had a talk with Mr. Pitkin, Mr. Cranston's partner. There was some discussion as to the expense and Tyson said he did not have the money. “Did you have any conversation with the defendant about suicide?” “Yes. I told him that if he had any intention of taking his life the best thing for him to do was to leave his revolver with Dr. Clark. He afterward told me he had torn up the lunacy complaint.” “From what you (had) seen would you say that the defendant's mind was unbalanced at that time?” “Yes, sir.” Cross examined by Mr. Ward – It was from the enlargement of the pupil of the eye, the strange way he looked at me and his peculiar demeanor generally that I formed the idea he was insane. He wouldn't look at me straight in the eye. A Nervous Expert – Dr. Eskridge – I am a specialist in nervous and mental diseases. I have examined Henry Tyson on three occasions. My opinion as to his ordinary mental condition is that he is a narrow minded man more or less vacillating and unreasonable and he has a very poor memory. He has forgotten the events of his early life. What he expected of Mrs. Tyson seemed to me was unreasonable. He would not allow her the liberties most women expect and demand. Persons thus organized do not possess the same self-control as where the mind is better balanced. They are less able to restrain themselves, avenging themselves for any real or supposed wrong. They are also most apt to have delusions than persons of a strong mind. A mind that is weak is more determined in its convictions than a healthy mind. Tyson is of a jealous disposition. Under ordinary circumstances I consider Tyson able to distinguish between right and wrong. His imaginings are very acute with regard to his wife, as if he had an insane passion for her… Jessie L. Metcalf, residing at 1308 Blake street was next called and testified that Mrs. Tyson had said she would drop Tyson if she had to poison him, and that she would not have him around if he was not her husband. “Did Mrs. Tyson have a bottle of whisky in her stocking in the witness room yesterday?” “Yes, sir.” Mrs. Metcalf also stated that the witnesses had been posting each other in the witness room as to what they were to say.

Tyson, Henry G.
Tyson, Henry G.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 6-27-1889 – Awaiting a Verdict – Evidence Closed in the Tyson Case and Arguments Heard on Both Sides – At 11:15 yesterday the long line of testimony of both the prosecution and the defense in the Tyson-King murder trial was before the exceedingly attentive but somewhat wearied jury. Eight days had been spent in the work, and probably no stone has been left unturned by the district attorney or counsel for the defense that would tend to help either side of the case. Whatever the result may be, no one who has been familiar with the testimony will question the fact that the trial has been one of the hardest fought in the annals of the district court. As the end draws near Tyson's indifference to his surroundings seems to increase. With eyes bent towards the ground and his feet invariably resting on his counsel's chair, the accused presents more the appearance of a weary and uninterested listener rather than of one whose life is trembling in the balance. The proceedings during the forenoon consisted of the recalling and examination of several witnesses by the district attorney. Purchasing Poison – George Pedlay, druggist, testified that on the 29th of April last, whilst employed in Healy's drug store at the corner of Sixteenth and Blake streets, he sold poison to Henry Tyson, who gave the name of John King. The entry he made at the time was “John King, 1223 Ninth street, twelve grains strychnine. Use, rats.” On cross-examination the witness stated that he spoke to Mr. Brierley as to who would pay his expenses for attending court and was informed that he must take his chances of getting paid by the defense. Dr. McLauthlin was next called and stated that he had examined the wounds on Tyson, alleged to have been sustained by him in the scuffle with King. The wound on the hand was scarred. It could not in the estimation of witness have been made by a sharp instrument such as the hatchet produced. The wound on the leg was similar to what would result from a man falling over something or running up against some object. Cross-examined – The wound is several weeks old. The scar on the hand appeared to be older than that upon the leg. W. F. Cole, recalled, stated that on hearing the shot fired he went around the alley of Mrs. Tyson's house. At the rear he saw a man who asked “what is this shooting about?” He had something clasped in his hand. He went away at a good gait and witness heard him say to some people he passed “clear the way there.” Mrs. W. F. Cole was also recalled and identified Tyson as the man who had called at her house inquiring for Mrs. Tyson on the night of the shooting. Mrs. Tyson identified the hatchet which King carried in his hand immediately after the shooting. Charles Linton, ex-chief of detectives, stated that nothing was said by Tyson whilst on the way from Kansas City to Denver with regard to his having any wounds. Mr. Mensedick gave similar testimony as to Tyson while in Kansas City. Dr. McLauthlin was called a third time and examined concerning Tyson's state of mind. He said: “From my observations of the defendant I would say that his memory of names, dates, etc., is somewhat lame. He has ordinary reasoning powers. His mind is such that he knows the difference between right and wrong.” Cross-examined – “He spoke feelingly of his child and said he wanted to die.” Both sides of the case being now closed Judge Allen charged the jury. His honor defined the several degrees of murder and manslaughter and presented exhaustive instructions on the different phases of the case. Arguments Opened – Mr. Ward opened the arguments and in an able speech reviewed the testimony, commenting in strong terms on the extreme improbability of the defendant's account of the killing. Step by step he followed the chain of testimony which the state had constructed against Tyson, and appealed to the common sense of the jury for a verdict of guilty. Counsel advanced telling arguments against both the self-defense and lunacy theories set up by the accused and dwelt at length on the doctors' testimony, which went to show that Tyson at the time of the killing knew the difference between right and wrong, and having this knowledge was responsible for his acts. The plea of insanity was characterized as the last resort of guilty prisoners. On the question of self-defense Mr. Ward commented on the actions of the defendant, holding that the letter written by him to Johnston, in which he threatened to “clean out the whole gang,” his sudden flight to Kansas, and other circumstances of the case, were a sufficient answer to any such flimsy defense. Mr. Brierly followed with an extended and impassioned appeal to the jury on behalf of his client, and Mr. Wykoff, whose efforts on behalf of Tyson have been of a more or less heroic nature, was also heard on behalf of the prisoner. Counsel spoke at length on the testimony of Dr. Clarke and other witnesses who declared that Tyson's mind was unbalanced. The matter of self-defense was also presented in its most favorable light. Mr. Wykoff had not concluded his address at 6:45 p.m., when his honor postponed the further hearing till this morning at 10 o'clock.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 8-7-1889 – Tyson's Case – He Is Said Not to Be Responsible for His Acts – The following letters were received at the governor's office yesterday, but as the governor was out of the city no intimation of the probable effect the facts stated would have on Tyson's fate could be learned: Hon. J. A. Cooper, Governor of Colorado – Dear Sir: I forward to you letters from Dr. E. C. Grey, physician of Colorado state penitentiary, and Judge D. E. Dudley, deputy warden. They voice the judgment expressed to you in my letter of previous date. The warden, J. A. Lampsing, will go to Denver this week and will see you. Respectfully yours, L. R. Hall, Chaplain Colorado State Penitentiary. – Honorable J. A. Cooper, Governor of Colorado: Henry Tyson, who is here from Arapahoe county under sentence of death, is, in my judgment, from daily observation, a man of unsound mind. He cannot give the names of his attorneys at times, so defective is his memory. His action here has convinced his attendants beyond a doubt that his mental faculties are seriously affected. In my opinion he is not responsible for his acts. Yours very truly, George E. Dudley, Deputy Warden. – Honorable Job A. Cooper, Governor of Colorado: As physician of the Colorado state penitentiary I have visited the prisoner, Henry Tyson, frequently and firmly believe that his mental condition is such that it in a large degree renders him irresponsible for whatever he does. I believe him to be afflicted with a species of insanity, and that he ought not to be treated in the eyes of the law as a sane man. E. C. Gray.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 8-20-1889 – Tyson's Insanity – The Prisoner Suffering from Congestion of the Brain – Mr. Brierley of counsel for Tyson returned last night from Canon City, where he has been for several days in the interest of his client. Mr. Brierley stated that he expected to obtain a hearing on the question of Tyson's insanity on or about the first of the month before a jury convened by the court to try that question. He reported Dr. Grey of the penitentiary as saying that Tyson had been suffering from an attack of congestion of the brain, which had confined him to his bed for four days. When Mr. Brierley called, Tyson did not know him. He hopes to get a hearing on the case by the 1st instant, and for this purpose will sue out a writ of habeas corpus and ask that it be made returnable at that time.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 10-8-1889 – Will Examine Tyson – The convicted murderer and seeming lunatic, Henry Tyson, was brought up from Canon City penitentiary yesterday by Under Sheriff Wheeler, and lodged in the county jail. Whether his actions are to be attributed to shamming or not remains to be decided, but jail officials assert that he is much more erratic and forgetful than ever before. “He absolutely knows or pretends to know nothing at all now,” said Mr. Wheeler. “He will not talk and refuses to answer even when asked a question.” On motion of Assistant District Attorney Ward Dr. Eskridge was appointed by Judge Allen to examine Tyson professionally and report from the investigation the result of his observations.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 10-19-1889 – Courts and Clients – Unable to Agree – The jury which deliberated thirty-six hours over the question of the insanity of Henry Tyson, condemned to death, yesterday morning notified the court that they had failed to agree and saw no chance of ever agreeing. They were accordingly discharged. It is understood that the first ballot resulted in a vote of seven for sanity to five for insanity, and so it stood throughout on every ballot taken. The result seems to have been expected by all who watched the case closely, the evidence on both sides being of a kind to bear home conviction and of an exceptionably conflicting nature. Nothing was done yesterday about resetting the case. Although tried by Judge Rucker it belongs in Judge Allen's division, and the latter is expected to express his further pleasure as to the advisability of trying it again in court at all or not. It is said that this probably finishes the court investigation, and that a commission will be appointed to report definitely and decisively whether the condemned murderer is really insane or merely feigning.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 10-25-1889 – The Tyson Case – The Tyson case came up again yesterday in the district court on an application by Mr. Wycoff to have a day fixed for a second investigation as to the insanity of the condemned man. District Attorney Stevens opposed the motion and drew the attention of the court to the fact that the previous inquisition was carried out in a manner unauthorized by the statute. Under the section it was provided that “the court” should make the inquisition, assisted by a jury. No authority could be found for the admission of counsel, either for the state or the prisoner. “It is absolutely ridiculous,” said Mr. Stevens, “that a man of unsound mind could instruct lawyers to appear for him.” After discussion it was decided that the court should hear arguments on Saturday next as to the proper modus operandi to be adopted at the inquisition. Tyson yesterday received the following letter from his brother in Missouri: Oct. the 20, 1887 – Well, I thot I would right you a fieu lines to in form you that I am well at present time and I hope when these fieu lines comes to hand may find you well at present time. Henry Tyson, I want you to let me know how you come out in that trile of yours if you can and if you can't, get your lawyer to inform me what they dun with you and when I get your letter from you I expect I will come out there right soon. Alfred M. Tyson, Clarence, Shelby county, Mo.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 1-27-1891 – Tyson Gets a Chance – James Tyson's petition for habeas corpus came up before Judge Allen of the criminal court yesterday. Tyson represents that he is unlawfully held in the penitentiary of Colorado; that he was indicted and tried at the April term of the district court in 1889, and was sentenced to be hanged on the 26th of July of that year; that the governor of the state granted him a respite of sixty days in order that his mental status might be inquired into; that on September 10, 1889, a motion was presented to the court representing Tyson's insanity, upon which question he had two trials. The jury in the first trial for insanity disagreed, the second jury found him insane. An application was made, in the meantime, to the supreme court for a supersedeas. His counsel contending “that the prisoner could not be legally executed” on the ground that the law under which he had been tried and convicted had been repealed and a new law of homicide enacted and gone into effect after the commission of the crime, and that a person sentenced under the old law was expost facto, unconstitutional and void… So far as Tyson's murder is concerned, he is entirely free under the decision of the supreme court. He is now being held for insanity, and this petition is to have him released from the penitentiary. He also represents that he is a poor person, and is allowed to prosecute as a pauper; and that his condition is such that he should be released. Judge Allen granted the writ of habeas corpus, returnable in twenty days from January 28, and directed the warden of the penitentiary to deliver Tyson to Sheriff Barton, who is directed to have his body in court on the return day of the writ.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 3-15-1895 – West Side Court – Judge Butler appointed Dr. J. T. Eskridge to examine Henry Tyson, in jail, charged with murder, as to his sanity. The motion to have this done was made several days ago. On February 11, Attorney N. Q. Tanquary made affidavit that the prisoner, then in the penitentiary, was of sound mind. Tyson was brought here to jail and will now be examined to determine his mental state. He was once convicted and sentenced to hang, but the insanity phase developed and interfered.

Tyson, Henry G.
Rocky Mountain News 3-20-1895 – Tyson Must Hang – Judge Butler Denies All Motions for Release or Delay – Henry Tyson's attorney will make another attempt to get the supreme court to take cognizance of the plight of his client. Yesterday Judge Butler refused to interfere to change the verdict in his division of the district court and set the second week in April for the execution of the sentence of July 26, 1889. Attorney N. Q. Tanquary's motion to discharge Tyson on the ground that the sentence against him had not been carried out and the courts had no hold on him, was yesterday morning denied. Judge Butler decided that the sentence had been suspended during the period of Tyson's insanity owing to that insanity, and now that the cause of delay was removed it must be carried into effect. He directed that Tyson be taken to Canon City and hanged during the second week of April. Attorney Tanquary then asked and was granted permission to file a petition for habeas corpus. In the afternoon the petition was filed and overruled, and the sheriff directed to carry out the morning's instructions. The attorney will now appeal to the supreme court for a supersedeas to delay the execution until the motion denied by Judge Butler can be acted on in the higher court.

Tyson, Henry G.
Denver Evening Post 3-20-1895 – Tyson Must Die – The supreme court has just decided that Tyson, the convicted murderer, must hang. Tyson was sentenced to death several years ago and escaped the death penalty on the grounds of insanity. He was resentenced to death a few days ago by Judge Butler and the supreme court now confirms Judge Butler's decision.

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