The Tri-County Obituary Project

Huerfano County, Pueblo County, and Las Animas County, Colorado.



The Tri-County Obituary Project Coordinator is Louise Adams .
This page contributed by Karen Mitchell.

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Thach, Jeannette Faris
Jeannette Faris Thach - Huerfano World - July 2, 1992 - Funeral service for Huerfano Jeannette Faris Thach, Southern Colorado real estate broker, educator, artist and historian was Saturday from J.M. Antle Funeral Home. Mrs. Thach died early Thursday, June 25, 1992, in Huerfano County Medical Center in Walsenburg. She was 81. Born Dec. 11, 1910 in Walsenburg to Asperidon and Louise Saliba Faris, she was the couple's oldest child and only daughter. Her father was the owner of a general store in then, Talpa, northwest of Walsenburg. When the citizens of Talpa applied for the permit to have their own Post Office, Jeannette was four. Her father, being the store owner, was designated to be the Postmaster. The people of Talpa were told they must choose another name for their town because it was confused by the Postal department with Talpa, NM. To honor their storekeeper, the townsfolk opted to name the town Farisita, a Spanish word meaning "little Faris girl," after Jeannette. She was then predestined to be a collector of history for the area and for the county. She spent much of her life preserving artifacts, articles, and mementos of historical significance to Huerfano County, Walsenburg and much of Southern Colorado. Mrs. Thach attended Huerfano County schools, graduating with honors. She went on to attend a two year teacher certification program in Greeley. Upon completion of this certification she returned to Walsenburg to earn a living teaching eight grades in a one room schoolhouse on the upper Huerfano River basin. During this time as a teacher and assisting her mother and brothers in the operation Of the store and sheep and cattle ranch she was introduced to a young reporter from United Press in Denver who had come to the area to do a story on the Penitentes. Jeannette Thach While escorting him around the county, the reporter, William Thach fell hopelessly in love with the young teacher acting as his guide. They were married while he was state editor for the Billings (MT) Gazette. The wedding took place on Apr. 25, 1936, in Billings. The couple returned to Huerfano County where they continued in the ranching business after Jeannette's mother became very ill. She returned to school teaching as a means to help support them during some very lean years in the ranching business. The Thaches became proud parents of a son, William M. Thach Jr., and a daughter, Edith Louise Thach. Shortly after, Thach formed a real estate brokerage partnership for Southern Colorado Land & Livestock Company. The untimely death of his partner brought Mrs. Thach into the world of real estate trading. She studied and became a licensed salesperson and then broker, becoming a full partner in the business that the two ran successfully for nearly 35 years. During this time Mrs. Thach continued with her community activities and was the driving force in the creation of Francisco Fort Museum in La Veta and served as a leader in the effort to build a modern 30 bed hospital to serve the county. Mrs. Thach was a water color artist and spent many hours accompanying Bill on ranch showings, painting endless small environmental images of the ever changing scenes of the Sangre de Cristo mountains she loved so much. She was honored by the Huerfano County Chamber of Commerce in 1978 as Outstanding Businesswoman of the community. She was mentioned in several editions of Outstanding Women of Colorado, Outstanding Women of America and Who's Who of American Women. She was an honored member of the Colorado State Historical Society, Business and Professional Women, Huerfano County Historical Society and Huerfano County Board of Realtors. She served on the President's Council of Senior Citizens, VISTA for Huerfano County. She was also a member of the Huerfano County Republican Party and the United Church of Walsenburg. Survivors include her husband, William, Walsenburg; two children, William, Denver and Edith Sheldon, Denver; a brother, Joe E. Faris, Walsenburg; four grandchildren, sisters-in-law, nieces and nephews. The family suggests contributions to the Huerfano County Historical Society in La Veta.

Thach, William Mason
William "Bill" Mason Thach - Huerfano World - April 17, 2003 - William Mason (Bill) Thach, a resident for nearly 70 years, passed away Monday, Apr. 14, 2003 at Spanish Peaks Regional Health Center. He was 93 years young. Born in Athens, Ala, in 1909, his father, Alabama State Senator Henry Clyde Thach was taken from him by an unfortunate death when Bill was only six and his mother, Edith Marion Mason-Thach then moved Bill, his elder brother and herself to Salt Lake City, UT, to be with other members of her family. Soon the entire family moved to Denver. Bill attended elementary and high school in Denver Public Schools and was among the first graduating class from the new East High School. He attended CU and graduated in 1932 with a degree in Journalism. He often related experiences that counted such well-known people as Pete Smythe and Byron "Wizzer" White among his college buddies. He was an athlete who excelled in boxing and baseball while attending CU and always supported the school's athletic endeavors as an avid fan. He also was a member of Phi Psi fraternity. Bill came to Huerfano County in 1934 while employed as a stringer for United Press in Denver. He was given the assignment of doing a story on the Penitente religion in Southern Colorado. When he arrived in Walsenburg and asked about finding out something about his assignment he was told to 'find Jeannette Faris because she would know.' He found her and she took him to see a Morada and then to witness the private service. He fell in love with her. When he asked to see her again, she tried to discourage him to no avail. They were married in Billings, MT, on Apr. 25, 1936 where Bill was named city editor of the Billings Gazette. Jeannette and Bill had Bill Jr. in 1938 and Edith Louise in 1941. During this time the family was ranching sheep after returning to Huerfano County. In 1944 during a downturn in the agricultural stock market Bill took and passed his real estate broker's test and entered into a partnership agreement with a local realtor. The realtor passed away very suddenly and Bill became the sole owner of the business. Jeannette also took her broker's test and then went to work with him. The couple built Southern Colorado Land and Livestock Company, one of the most successful real estate businesses in Southern Colorado and perhaps in all of the state. Among Bill's many accomplishments were transactions involving most of the land deals in Huerfano County and many other parcels throughout the state and New Mexico that were transacted through the office. Bill took flying lessons, became the owner and pilot of a Piper Pacer, ran for the Colorado State Senate on the Republican ticket and was defeated by the Democratic candidate. He served on the city council twice, belonged to the Chamber of Commerce, the Huerfano County Board of Realtors, Lions Club, Elks Club, served as a deacon for the Community Church and later the United Church of Walsenburg and became a Master Appraiser for the State Highway Department. He assisted in the effort to fund and build the Walsenburg Municipal Golf Course and became one of the most avid golfers the course has known. Bill displayed an unparalleled passion for whatever he did. He was highly respected for his ethics in business. He and Jeannette always appreciated the opportunity to live and do business in Huerfano County. Bill and Jeannette retired from the real estate business in 1976 to spend time with their art, golfing and traveling. They had built a beautiful home with a fabulous view of the Sangre de Cristo Range and each enjoyed expressing their artistic talents in different mediums. Bill was terribly saddened to lose Jeannette in 1981 and fondly recalled many wonderful memories of their 55 years together. They surely must be rejoicing to be together now. Survivors include: Bill Jr. and his beloved companion Karen Kaiser Their four children include Bill's children, Jason Asperidon of Carlsbad, CA, and Rebecca Clair of New York City. Karen's children are Wendy Nossaman of Denver and Aason and Eric Alms and son Brayden of Pasadena, CA. Bill's daughter Edith is widowed from John Sheldon. Her children include Michael Mason and wife Lori, their son John Patrick and daughter Nancy Jeannette of Broomfield, CO and William David of Southbury, CT and wife Joy, one niece, Susan Thach Dean of Annapolis, MD, three cousins, Cindy Smith, Rusty McClintick and Barbara Blow. Surviving in-laws include members of the John Faris, James Faris and Joe Faris families. Following cremation, memorial services will be held on Monday, April 21, at the United Church of Walsenburg at 11:00 a.m. There will be a brief reception immediately following the service in the basement of the church. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the William Thach Memorial Fund at the Community Bank of Walsenburg.

Thacker, Carol F.
Mrs. Carol F. Thacker - Pueblo Chieftain - March 10, 2004 - Mrs. Carol F. Thacker, 59. Anchorage resident Carol F. Thacker, 59, died in her home Saturday, March 6, 2004 of a Heart Attack and Cancer of the Lungs. Visitation will be held March 9 & 10, 2004 from 5-8:00 P.M. at Kehl's Forest Lawn Mortuary, 11621 Old Seward. Services will be held March 11, 2004 at 2:00 P.M. at Jewell Lake Church of The Nazarene, 4025 W. 88th. Her cremains will be buried at Imperial Gardens in Pueblo, Colorado. Mrs. Thacker was born May 8, 1944 in Colorado Springs, Colo. She attended High School at East High in Pueblo, Colorado. In October of 1980 she became a resident of Anchorage. In 1983 she started C & L Enterprises and was an active Officer (secretary) in its operation. Carol loved homemaking and business. Her family stated "She will be missed by all who touched her in life and whose lives she touched." Mrs. Thacker was preceded in death by two of her sons, Christopher James Thacker & Eric Mayers Thacker, and her sister Lola Baker. She is survived by her husband LaVerne M. Thacker Jr., son Todd James Thacker, brothers Cliffer and Larry Gray, grandchildren Kristine McDaniel, Kourtney Frazuer and Kathryn Rieth and brother-in-law Bob Baker. Memorial Donations can be made to American Diabetes Association, 801 W Fireweed Lane #103, Anchorage, AK 99503 or American Heart Association, 1057 W. Fireweed Lane Suite 206, Anchorage, AK 99503 in lieu of flowers. Arrangements were made by Kehl's Forest Lawn Mortuary.

Thacker, Irvin Earl
Irvin Earl Thacker - Pueblo Chieftain - March 16, 2005 - Irvin Earl Thacker, 81, born May 29, 1923, passed away peacefully at his home in Rye on March 14, 2005. Preceded in death by his parents, Edgar and Stella Thacker; brother, LaVerne Thacker; brother-in-law, Robert May; and son-in-law, Jim Perkins. Survived by his loving wife of 61 years Madelyne; and his children, Linda Perkins, Charlotte (Dave) Baker, Illinois, Norman (Joy) Thacker; and Monie (Eddie) Hintz of Nevada. Also survived by 12 grandchildren; 18 great-grandchildren; one great-great-grandchild; brothers, Freddie (Pam) Thacker and Edward "Junior" (Jennie) Thacker; numerous nieces, nephews, other relatives and many friends. Irvin was a World War II Army Air Corp veteran serving in the South Pacific. He was a rancher and farmer in the Rye area all of his life. His many joys in his life were his children and grandchildren, and taking care of his many animals. He was a kind man who did not know the meaning of the word no. His handshake was his word. Irvin always had a smile on his face and will be sadly missed by all those who knew him. He lived up to the old adage "good guys wear white hats." At his request, no viewing. Cremation with a memorial service, 2 p.m. Friday, Imperial Funeral Home Chapel, with military honors by the Pueblo Veterans Ritual Team. A private family inurnment will be held at a later date.

Thacker, Leona Ethlyn
Leona Ethlyn Thacker - Pueblo Chieftain - March 07, 2002 - Age 86, born July 11, 1915, in Goodland, Kan., passed away March 4, 2002, in Colorado Springs, Colo. Preceded in death by her parents; loving husband, LaVerne M. Thacker; daughter, Elaine Reynolds; brothers, Harry and David Belvill, William Jenkins; sisters, Lucille Thacker, Zetta Mae McKenna; grandchildren, Timothy Rafferty, Evan Cochran, Christopher and Eric Thacker, Willard Hahn; great-grandchildren, Jedidah Rafferty, and Seth Flerchinger. Survived by daughter, Lanore (Boyd) Rafferty; sons, Gilbert (Hope) Cooper, Wesley (Claire) Cooper, Tom (Tanny) Cooper, Ben (Donna) Hahn, LaVerne (Carol) Thacker Jr., Michael (Barbara) Thacker; and foster son, Francisco (Rita) Valenzuela; 19 grandchildren, 36 great-grandchildren, and 11 great-great-grandchildren. Graveside service, 11 a.m. Saturday, Imperial Memorial Gardens, Pueblo, Colo.

Thacker, Madelyne L.
Madelyne L. “Grandma” Thacker - Greenhorn Valley View - June 10, 2009 - Madelyne L. “Grandma” Thacker, 83, born August 31, 1925, passed away June 2, 2009. Preceded in death by her parents, William and Dorothy May; husband, Irvin Thacker; brother, Robert May; and son-in-law, Jim Perkins. Survived by her children, Linda Perkins, Charlotte (Dave) Baker, Norman (Joy) Thacker and Monie Hintz. Loving Grandma to 12 grandchildren; 26 great-grandchildren; and 1 1/2 great-great grandchildren. Also survived by numerous other relatives and friends. Madelyne spent most of her life on the family ranch beside her husband Irvin. Her many joys in life were being a Girl Scout leader, “Birthday Club”, her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Grandma always loved being surrounded by her family. At her request, cremation with a memorial service to held on Saturday, June 13, 2009, 11:00 a.m., Rye Home United Methodist Church. Inurnment, Brookside Cemetery. Donations may be made in her memory to a charity of your choice.

Tharp, Mildred L.
Mildred L. Tharp - Colorado Springs Gazette - May 13, 1993 - Mildred L. Tharp, 71, of Florence died May 10, 1993. She was a homemaker and former resident of Colorado Springs. The funeral will be held at 10 a.m. today at Wilson Funeral Home chapel, Canon City, with the Rev. Terry Eyman officiating. Mrs. Tharp was born June 12, 1921, in Punkin Hollow, Mo., to Ed and Anna (Stevens) Wagner. She was married May 28, 1938, to Otto Tharp, who survives. Mrs. Tharp also is survived by a son, Lonnie of Canon City; two daughters, Alice of Pueblo and Dortha Clausen of Penrose; two brothers, LeRoy Wagner of Colorado Springs and Paul Wagner of Santa Rosa, Calif.; a sister, Grace Aden of Colorado Springs; 10 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. She had four brothers, Charles Wagner, Arthur Wagner, Eugene Wagner and Jake Wagner, and a sister, Dorothy Ellingsworth, who are deceased.

Thatcher, Ella
Mrs. Ella Thatcher - Colorado Daily Chieftain - July 20, 1875 - One of the largest funeral processions which we recollect seeing in Pueblo was that which on Sunday afternoon attended to their final resting place the remains of Mrs. Ella Thatcher, wife of H.C. Thatcher, Esq., of this city. Mrs. Thatcher had many warm friends in this city and her death will leave a vacancy in her large circle of acquaintances which will not soon be filled. Mr. Thatcher has the sympathy of the entire community in his great bereavement.

Thatcher, Ella May
Ella May Thatcher - Colorado Daily Chieftain - August 18, 1875 - On Sunday last, H.C. Thatcher, whose wife died a short time since, suffered a second bereavement in the loss of his little daughter, Ella May, aged three months. The funeral took place on Monday morning. Mr. Thatcher has the sympathy of many friends in his double bereavement.

Thatcher, Ethel M.
Ethel M. Thatcher - Pueblo Chieftain - July 09, 1998 - Ethel M. Thatcher, 89, passed away July 4, 1998. Memorial service, 2 p.m. Friday, at the Peacock-Wood Chapel.

Thatcher, Henry Calvin
Judge Henry Calvin Thatcher - Aspen Weekly Times - March 20, 1884 - Judge Henry Calvin Thatcher, of Pueblo, died of Bright's disease at San Francisco on the 20th. He came to Colorado in 1866. March 21, 1884 - Special Dispatch to the Tribune, Pueblo - March 20, 1884 - As the Tribune readers are aware, Judge Henry C. Thatcher has been lying at San Francisco quite sick for the past week. This morning news was received that he had breathed his last at 5:35 a.m. of Bright's disease of the kidneys. Judge Thatcher and wife, and a party of friends left Pueblo for a visit to Southern California about March 1. The Judge was apparently in excellent health and spirits, but it was known to his intimate friends that he had been suffering from kidney complaint. Arriving at Los Angeles, several days were spent there, but the weather being so damp and disagreeable a steamer was boarded for San Francisco on the 9th of March, and at noon the following day the deceased was seized with convulsions, which continued for several hours. There was no physician on board, but one was procured at Port Hartford, where the boat touched, and the journey was continued to San Francisco. The afflicted man never rallied from the attack and sank rapidly until death relieved him. Henry Calvin Thatcher was born in Perry county Pennsylvania, on April 21, 1842. He was educated at the Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, graduating in 1864. The succeeding year he read law at Hollidaysburg, Penn. In the spring of 1866 he graduated in the law department of the Albany University, New York, and in the fall of the same year he came to Colorado, and at once located at Pueblo. Here he commenced the practice of his profession, which he has actively continued since, with the exception of three year's service as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Colorado. In 1879 he was appointed United States Attorney of Colorado by president Grant, the duties of which office he discharged for more than a year, when he resigned. He was elected a member of the Constitutional Convention from this district on a non partisan ticket, and in 1876 he was nominated by the Republicans as one of the candidates for the Supreme Court of Colorado, to which he was elected, and in drawing lots for terms, Judge Thatcher drew the short term - three years - thus becoming Chief Justice. At the conclusion of his term of office he returned to Pueblo and resumed the practice of his profession as a member of the firm of Thatcher & Gast, which formed in 1874. At the time of his death he was the solicitor of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe road for the State of Colorado. Judge Thatcher was first married in 1869, his wife dying in 1875. The fruit of the first marriage was a son, now about 12 years old, who survives his father. In 1879 the deceased was married to his present wife, the fruit of the second marriage being also a son, now, in his third year. The father and mother of the deceased are still living at Martinsburg, Pennsylvania. Deceased was recognized as one of the most influential citizens of Southern Colorado, and was universally acknowledged to stand at the head of the Pueblo bar. His death is regarded by all who knew him and is regretted as a public calamity to Pueblo, of which he was one of the most progressive and enterprising citizens. The Colorado Prospector - November 1927 - First State Supreme Court Justice Henry Calvin Thatcher - First Chief Justice of Colorado Henry Thatcher found his niche in the legal profession. A widely known and respected jurist, Judge Thatcher served as chief justice of Colorado from 1876 to 1880 retiring from the bench to practice law in the Pueblo area. Rocky Mountain News - March 21, 1884 - A Dead Jurist - Judge Thatcher, of Pueblo, Died in San Francisco, Yesterday - The announcement of the death of Judge Henry C. Thatcher, of Pueblo, at San Francisco yesterday morning was a shock to all the old-timers of Colorado. Judge Thatcher went to California several weeks ago, prior to which time he had not complained of any serious ailment beyond the slight attacks of rheumatism, although the dispatches say the cause of his death was Bright's disease of the kidneys. He was born in Perry county, Pa., April 21, 1842, and was consequently in his forty-second year at the time of his death. His father was Henry Thatcher, of New Jersey, and a merchant. The Thatchers were of English extraction, having come to this country fifty years before the revolution, and members of the family figured in it. His mother was Lydia A. Albert, of German descent. Both parents are yet living and reside at Martinsburg, Pa. They are strict members of the German Reformed church, in which faith their children were educated. He attended public school in his native town, spent two years at a school in Academia, Juniata county, Pa., from which he graduated in 1864 with the highest honors. During the succeeding year he taught school and studied law under Essington Hammond, of Hollidaysburg, Pa., for a year and then entered the law department of the Albany university from which he graduated in the summer of 1866 with the degree of L. L. B. He immediately returned to his home in Hollidaysburg, Pa., and was admitted to the bar of the state. After practising law about three months he obeyed Horace Greeley's injunction and came West. At that time Topeka, Kas., was the western terminus of the Kansas Pacific railroad, and the rest of the journey had to be made in wagon trains. The trip across the plains occupied sixty-five days, and he arrived in Pueblo October 31, 1866. In January, 1867, he began the practice of law in that city, in which, with the exception of the three years he was upon the Supreme bench, he has ever since been engaged. In January, 1868, he was appointed by President Johnson United States attorney for the district of Colorado, but resigned this office May, 1869, being elected a member of the constitutional convention the same day by a joint convention of both parties, such was the confidence he had already inspired in people of all classes in the state. In 1874 he united in partnership with him Charles E. Gast, Esq., the firm being Thatcher & Gast. In 1876 he was elected a judge of the supreme court of Colorado at the first state election which was held, together with Judges Wells and Elbert. As the terms of the justices were determined by law to be three, six and nine years respectively, lots were drawn and the three years term fell to Judge Thatcher who, by virtue of this fact, became chief justice. His term of office expired January 13, 1880, when, declining a renomination, he resumed the practice of law with his old partner, Gast, leaving a judicial record as pure and unstained as that of any man who had ever sat upon the bench. During the meetings of the constitutional convention in the winter of 1875 and '76, he rendered valuable service as a member of important committees. He was chairman of the committee on the legislature and legislation, and was a member of those on judiciary, public and private corporations and congressional and legislative apportionments. Ever since his advent into the state he has been identified with nearly every public enterprise, and his influence was always exerted toward developing the resources of the state and its institutions. He was prominently connected with the Pueblo and Salt Lake Railroad company and the Pueblo and Arkansas Valley Railroad company, which latter company is now leased to the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe company, of which he and his partner have ever since been the solicitors. Judge Thatcher was a member of the first town council of Pueblo. He has been twice married, the first time in Pueblo, March 2, 1870, to Miss Ella J. Snyder, of Perry county, Pa., who died July 19, 1875. One child born in December, 1871, was the result of the union. July 16, 1879, he married Sallie B. Ashcom, of Bedford, Pa., by whom he had one son, born in 1881. The record of Judge Thatcher's life is that of a useful and busy one, filled with honor and respect of his fellow citizens during short measure. A learned jurist said of him: "As a jurist Mr. Thatcher ranks high. Well educated and richly endowed by nature his career as chief justice was satisfactory to the bar and people. During his term important questions arose incident to the transition from a territorial to a state government and from the common law to a state code of practice. The opinions of Judge Thatcher on these and other important questions were recognized by the bar and people as clear, forcible and correct solutions of the questions involved, and many of them will stand as leading cases in the jurisprudence of the state." Judge Thatcher's remains will arrive in Pueblo Monday.

Thatcher, Infant
Infant Thatcher – Pueblo Colorado Daily Chieftain – February 20, 1873 – A little baby of Mr. and Mrs. Thatcher was buried yesterday. But a few friends of the family knew of the circumstances or there would have been a much larger attendance at the funeral. The family have our sincere sympathy in their sad affliction.

Thatcher, John A.
John A. Thatcher - Brandon Bell - August 22, 1913 - John A. Thatcher Dead - Pueblo Millionaire was Pioneer of Colorado - Interested in Many Enterprises, Reputed to be Worth $25,000,000 to $40,000,000 - Pueblo - John A. Thatcher, multi-millionaire and pioneer directly interested in many Colorado financial and commercial enterprises, died at his home here. Although he had been sick for some time, his death came suddenly. He passed an easy night and was sitting up in a chair when he gasped, pressed his hand to his side and expired before he could be relieved from the unexpected attack. John A Thatcher and his brother, M.D. Thatcher, are reputed to be worth between $25,000,000 and $40,000,000. They are interested in practically the same institutions and it is difficult to separate their affairs to arrive at a conservative estimate of the dead man's estate. He owned stock in numerous banks in eastern and southern Colorado, shares in irrigation enterprises and bank buildings and much real estate throughout the state. Mr. Thatcher was seventy-seven years old and was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1836. He came to Colorado fifty years ago in a prairie schooner. He soon took high rank among the energetic men of the period and all his life has been recognized as an ambitious man of great business and executive ability, as far seeing financier and a state builder of conservative beliefs.

Thatcher, Mahlon D. Sr.
Mahlon D. Thatcher – Telluride Daily Journal – February 22, 1916 – Mahon Thatcher Dies in Pueblo – Fortune Estimated at $50,000,000 – Pueblo, Feb. 22 – Mahlon Thatcher, one of the most prominent and widely known men in Colorado, died at his home here this morning at the age of 76 years. Mr. Thatcher has been sick for several weeks and was unable to recover from his attack of illness. A case of La Grippe which seized him several weeks ago caused a general breakdown from which the aged man was unable to recover. Thatcher is reputed to be Colorado's wealthiest citizen. He was an official of and interested in strings of banking institutions throughout Colorado, New Mexico, and Montana, making his headquarters in this city. His private fortune is today estimated at close to $50,000,000. Thatcher came to Colorado about 50 years ago and at that time was practically penniless. Del Norte San Juan Prospector – February 26, 1916 – Thatcher is Dead – Colorado's Richest Citizen Passes Away at Pueblo – His Wife, Son and Three Daughters at Bedside – Was Identified With Almost Every Line of Business – Pueblo, Colo. – Mahlon D. Thatcher, generally considered to be the richest man in Colorado, and since pioneer days a central figure in the industrial and financial growth of the Rocky Mountain region, died at his home here today. His wife, son, and three daughters were at the bedside. Mr. Thatcher, who was 76 years old, had been ill six weeks, and during the last few days his death had been expected at any time. Earlier in the morning it was announced from his home that, although he had regained consciousness he was too weak to give any sign that he recognized his son, who is expected to carry on the enormous financial affairs found by Mr. Thatcher and his brother the late John A. Thatcher. His illness began with a nervous breakdown, which soon developed into uremic poisoning. As the illness continued, a general weakening of all bodily organs except the heart and lungs developed, but due to the tremendous power of these, hope was held out that he would recover until a few days ago. The remarkable vitality of the man whose business acumen was a foundation of much of the prosperity of the entire West, from Chicago to the coast, kept him alive. Mr. Thatcher owned nineteen banks and many other large properties. His interests were almost unbelievably wide. His capital is thought to have furnished financial bulwarks to more than a hundred establishments. Mr. Thatcher came to Colorado in 1865, without money or influence, and by a combination of pluck, energy, and rare ability, erected a financial structure throughout several states. Estimates on his wealth range from $10,000,000 to $30,000,000, with $15,000,000 probably close to actual aggregate. The foundation of his wealth, which is widely diversified, was laid in the conservatism which the banker maintained in business affairs. Though his capital backed scores of successful enterprises, his investments were never speculative. Silverton Standard – February 26, 1916 – M. D. Thatcher, Colorado's Greatest Banker, Dies at Pueblo – Mahlon D. Thatcher, one of the highest respected old pioneers and leading bankers of Colorado and president of the First National bank, passed away at his home in Pueblo Tuesday morning at 10:30 o'clock. He was one of our state's most active builders and his name is affiliated in one way or another with every step of our state's progress. The news of his death was received by his old time friend and associate, Cashier John H. Werkheiser of the First National bank of this city, Tuesday morning, by the following wire, which in a way also explains the future policy to be followed by the heirs. The message said, “M. D. Thatcher passed away at 10:30 this morning. The sons of John A. and M. D. Thatcher will perpetuate the characteristic business policies of their honored fathers.” The funeral was held Thursday afternoon at Pueblo at 2:00 o'clock at which time the bank in this city closed its doors and remained closed during the remainder of the day as a mark of respect to the memory of its late distinguished and honored president and founder. Steamboat Springs Routt County Sentinel – March 3, 1916 – Business Suspended During Funeral – Pueblo, Colo. – Business in Pueblo ceased during the time of the funeral of M. D. Thatcher. Not only were all of the banks closed, but all of the business houses, railroad offices and all public buildings as well. Bayfield Blade – March 10, 1916 – The funeral of M. D. Thatcher, Colorado's richest citizen, was the largest ever held in Pueblo. Routt County Republican – March 17, 1916 – Thatcher Will Filed – Pueblo Banker Leaves Home and $500,000 to Widow – Son Gets Bank Stock and $50,000 Cash and Three Daughters Each Left $20,000 Cash – Denver – M. D. Thatcher, son of the late Mahlon D. Thatcher, and John H. Thatcher and Raymond Thatcher, sons of the late John A. Thatcher of Pueblo, were in Denver conferring with bankers in reference to the handling of the stock in Denver institutions held by the heirs of the Pueblo financiers. Contemporaneously with the visit of the son of Mahlon D. Thatcher here, the contents of the latter's will were made public in Pueblo. The specific bequests made by the will follow: To the widow, Hilcrest, the Thatcher residence, with all furniture, books, pictures, statuary and other articles in the house and all carriages, horses and automobiles, in addition to a cash bequest of $500,000 to be selected by her from any security in the entire estate. To M. D. Thatcher, Jr., the testator's watch and chain and all personal jewelry, all his stock in the First National Bank of Pueblo (a half interest), $50,000 cash and all realty except the residence property. Cash sums of $20,000 each to the three daughters, Mrs. William Waller and Mrs. Robert C. Wheeler of Chicago and Mrs. Robert L. Huntzinger of New York City. Sums of $10,000 each to his sisters, Mrs. Sarah P. Bloom of Trinidad, and Mrs. Mary C. Everhart of Martinsburg, Pa. Sums of $3,000 each to his sisters-in-law, Mrs. F. W. Cooper of Pueblo and Mrs. Charles F. Jordan of Ouray. The sum of $3,000 to his nephew, M. T. Everhart of Pueblo. The sum of $3,000 to Miss Elizabeth Fisher of Pueblo, a nurse who has served in the family. Sums of $3,000 each to his brothers-in-law, Edwin P. and Charles F. Jordan of Pueblo. The sum of $10,000 to Robert F. Lytle (deceased), cashier of the First National Bank of Pueblo. A similar amount to A. S. Booth, vice president of the bank. Household servants were remembered as follows: $1,000 to Avrid Johnson (deceased), coachman, and $500 each to Anna Johnson and Mary Morgan. Weekly Ignacio Chieftain - February 25, 1916 - Richest Coloradoan Dead - M.D. Thatcher Passes Away at His Home in Pueblo - Mahlon D. Thatcher, generally considered to be the richest man in Colorado, and since pioneer days a central figure in the industrial and financial growth of the Rocky Mountain region, died at his home here today. His wife, son and three daughters were at the bedside. Mr. Thatcher, who was 76 years old had been ill six weeks, and during the last few days his death had been expected at any time. Earlier in the morning it was announced from his home that, although he had regained consciousness he was too weak to give any sign that he recognized his son, who is expected to carry on the enormous financial affairs founded by Mr. Thatcher and his brother the late John A. Thatcher. Weekly Ignacio Chieftain - March 24, 1916 - The will of Mahlon D. Thatcher, Sr., who died several weeks ago, was admitted to probate in the County Court at Pueblo and letters testamentary issued to Albert S. Booth, M. D. Thatcher, Jr., and Robert T. Wheeler, executors under the terms of the document.

Thatcher, Will N.
Will N. Thatcher - Pagosa Springs News - July 23, 1891 - Will N. Thatcher, of Pueblo, graduated from Yale a few weeks ago and with a party of companions went to Europe. He was taken sick and died suddenly at Chester, England.

Thaxton, Lumma E.
Lumma E. Thaxton - Pueblo Chieftain - July 10, 1987 - Lumma E. Thaxton, 102, passed away July 9, 1987, at Palisade Nursing Home. Mr. Thaxton is survived by four children, Opal Perry, La Verne Thaxton, both of Texas; Harold (Ruth) Thaxton of Denver, Arlyne (Ernest) Putter, Clifton; six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. He also is survived by numerous other relatives and friends. Preceded in death by his wife, Eva Thaxton, in 1952. Mr. Thaxton was born July 24, 1884, in Missouri. He was a longtime Pueblo resident until 1974 when he moved to Clifton, where he resided for the past 13 years. Graveside service at 3 p.m. Saturday, July 11, 1987, at Imperial Memorial Gardens. Interment, Resthaven, Imperial Memorial Gardens.

Thayer, Dr.
Dr. Thayer – Pueblo Colorado Daily Chieftain – June 22, 1875 – A report reached us from Canon City on Sunday, to the effect that Dr. Thayer, editor of the Avalanche, had died that day.

Thayer, Fern Eleanor
Fern Eleanor Thayer - Pueblo Chieftain Pueblo - Chieftain May 01, 2000 - Fern Eleanor Thayer, cherished wife, mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend joined her heavenly father on April 27, 2000. She was born in Skiatook, Okla., on Sept. 9, 1935. She surrounded herself with countless friends and activities; she devoted herself to her family and volunteer work for the Ronald McDonald House. Her spirit remains with those surviving her: beloved husband, Don; daughter, Janna and her fiancι Michael; daughter, Lisa and her husband Bob; grandson, Derek; sister, Betty; brother, Harvey; nieces, nephews and countless friends. The love she gave is forever in our hearts; her compassion, strong spirit, and faith will never be forgotten. Memorial donations may be made in lieu of flowers, "in loving memory of Fern Thayer" to the American Cancer Society, 6440 S. Lewis, Tulsa, Okla., 74136. Services will be held on May 2, 2000 at 2 p.m. at Skiatook, Oklahoma Methodist Church.

Thayer, Joy T.
Joy T. Thayer - Pueblo Chieftain - September 13, 2001 - Joy T. Thayer, 56, of 1119 6th Street, Las Animas, Colo., died peacefully Wednesday morning, Sept. 12, 2001, at her home. She is survived by her husband, James Thayer, Las Animas home; two sons, Mark K. Thayer, Kansas City, Mo., and Robert J. and Beth Thayer, Fredrick, Colo.; grandson, Cameron Thayer, Kansas City, Mo.; her parents, Rev. John and Medrith Horber II, Las Animas; one sister, Barbara (Jim) Woodruff, Dodge City, Kan.; two brothers, Chester (JoAnne) Horber, Aurora, and John (Janet) Horber III, Las Animas. Joy worked several years for 1st National Bank, Las Animas. Then with her husband Jim, as Variety Aircraft, and recently owned and operated Las Animas Coin Laundry. Funeral services will be held 10 a.m. Saturday at the 1st Presbyterian Church, Las Animas, with burial to follow in the Las Animas Cemetery. Family respectfully requests memorials to Ark-Valley Hospice Organization.

Theis, Harry A.
Harry A. Theis - Pueblo Chieftain - July 14, 1986 - Harry A. Theis, 75, Pueblo resident for 49 years, late of 30343 Hillside Road, passed away July 11, 1986. He was a member of the Park Hill Baptist Church and Silver State Lodge No. 95, AF&AM. He retired as an engineer from the Santa Fe Railroad in 1974 after 37 years of service and was a member of the United Transportation Union No. 24 and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Engineers Local 224. He was also an active sportsman. Mr. and Mrs. Theis celebrated their 49th wedding anniversary on June 20, 1986. Survivors include his wife, Dolly Theis of the family home; one son, Kenneth D, Theis of Logan, Utah; four daughters, Joyce M. (Robert) Thompson of Minot, N.D., Harriet (Bill) Gant of Pueblo, Jeannine (Ronald) Lewis of Tempe, Ariz., and Marilyn (Dale) Collett of Littleton; two sisters, Lucille Schiewe and Lillie (Fred) Meyers, both of Pueblo; and a sister-in-law, Mary Theis of Pueblo; 11 grandchildren and one great-grandchild and numerous nieces and nephews. The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday in the Adrian Comer Garden Chapel with the Rev. Leaon Griswold of the Park Hill Baptist Church officiating. Interment will be in the Roselawn Cemetery. Those who wish may make donations to the Park Hill Baptist Church or Hospice through the funeral home office. The family may be contacted at 30341 Hillside Road.

Theis, Jean
Jean Theis - Pueblo Chieftain - August 06, 1999 - Jean Theis, 81, passed away Aug. 4, 1999, (married Nov. 30, 1939). Jean is survived by her loving husband, Richard- and six children, Michael of Florissant, Daniel (Lisa) of Colorado Springs, Raymond (Sandy) of Round Rock, Texas, Anne (David) Jackson of Owasso, Okla., Lillian (Doug) Krow-Jones of Pueblo and Mary (James) Merritt of Jacksonville, Fla.- seven grandchildren, Jeffrey and Matthew Theis, Brandy and Charity Krow, Danika Jones, Austin and Megan Jackson- and numerous nieces and nephews in the Burlington, Iowa area. She was a devoted mother and wife. Funeral Mass will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 7, at Christ the King Catholic Church. At the family's request, there will not be a graveside service.

Theis, Mary Edith
Mary Edith Theis - Pueblo Chieftain - May 01, 2005 - Mary Edith Theis, 89, passed away April 28, 2005. Life began for Mary on Feb. 2, 1916, in Palisade, Colo., she moved to Oklahoma in 1924, and returned to Colorado in 1938. She married Lewis J. Theis on April 17, 1937. Survived by her children, Sally (Lloyd) Hastings of Dunnigan, Calif., Carolyn (Jim) Koen and Sonny Lewis Theis, all of Pueblo; daughter-in-law, Ene Theis; six grandchildren, Eric, Raetta, Rena, Damian, Jalyn and Jim; and numerous great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by her husband, Lewis; son, Carl; parents, Edith and Emmett Coleman; two brothers; and grandson, Shawn Theis. Mary enjoyed life and loved meeting new friends. She was a school teacher and retired after 35 years of service. She was proud of the fact that she kept in contact with some of her former students for over 60 years. Life member of Alpha Delta Kappa, International Honorary Teachers Sorority, life member of Adah Chapter No. 34, O.E.S., White Shrine of Jerusalem, Order of the Amaranth, Dames of Malta, Ladies Society of Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, Pueblo Locomotive and Rail Historical Society, Colorado Heritage Center, Jac-X-Pres and Irish Club. As per her request, there will be no viewing. Cremation, Montgomery & Steward Crematorium. Graveside service, 10 a.m. Tuesday, May 3, 2005, at Roselawn Cemetery, with Chaplain Dave Hamilton officiating. Those who desire may make memorial contributions to the Sangre de Cristo Hospice through the funeral home.

Theis, Rebecca S.
Rebecca S. (Hubbard) Theis - Pueblo Chieftain - July 03, 2005 - Rebecca S. (Hubbard) Theis, 38, went home with the Lord on Thursday, June 30, 2005, after a lengthy illness. Becky was born on March 1, 1967 in Pueblo, Colo. She enjoyed painting, fishing, and racing cars out at PMI. She brought happiness and joy to all who knew her. Becky was guided through heaven's gate by her father, Bill Hubbard; grandparents, Harry and Doris Vincent, and Morgan and Anne Hubbard. She will be sadly missed by her mother, Louise Hubbard; sisters, Cindy Montoya (Gilbert), Lori Hubbard, Stacey Bollin (Kirk); nieces, Desiree Hubbard, Kaitlyn Bollin, nephews, Austin Garrison, Kyle Bollin, DeAngelo Duran; two special uncles, James Vincent (Patricia), and Gaylord Vincent. Becky also leaves behind numerous friends who knew and loved her. Viewing, noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday. Funeral service, 10 a.m. Thursday, July 7, to honor her memory at Imperial Chapel. Interment will follow and a reception in the hall. In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to be made to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at www.jdrf.org/cosprings- branch.

Theis, Roland Carl
Roland Carl Theis - Pueblo Chieftain - November 18, 2004 - Roland Carl Theis, 62, passed away Nov. 16, 2004. He is preceded in death by his father, Lewis Theis; and his son, Shawn Theis. Survived by his wife, Earlene “Ene” Theis; children, Damian (Krisanne) Theis and Darla Theis; mother, Mary Theis; grandchildren, Brian, Amanda, Zach, Tony, Maxine and Alex; sisters, Sally (Lloyd) Hastings, Dunnigan, Calif., and Carolyn (James) Koen, Pueblo; brother, Sonny Theis, Pueblo. He also is survived by his nieces and nephews Eric, Raetta, Rena, Jalyn and Jim, as well as numerous other family and friends, including his lifelong friends, Rob Roberson and Ray and Charlotte Santistevan. Carl was a brakeman and switchman for the Santa Fe Railroad. He was a founding member of PMI and was a member of the National Hot Rod Association. At his request, cremation. Memorial service, 10 a.m. Saturday, Adrian Comer Garden Chapel. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to either the PMI “Someone Special” Fund at Pueblo Bank & Trust or to Sangre de Cristo Hospice.

Theis, Shawn D.
Shawn D. Theis - Pueblo Chieftain - August 15, 1999 - Shawn D. Theis, 33, passed away unexpectedly Aug. 11, 1999. Survived by his loving wife, Darla Theis, of the family home- adored daughter, Amanda Theis-parents, Carl (Linda) Theis and Sheila Sullivan, all of Pueblo- mother-in-law, Genevieve (Ronald) Nealley- father-in-law, Virgil Thomas, all of Pueblo-stepchildren, Brian and Brittany Sena, both of Pueblo- grandmother, Mary Theis of Pueblo- brother, Damian Theis of Pueblo- step-brothers, Adam and Mathew Taylor, both of Pueblo- brothers-in-law, Darrell (Beverly) Thomas of Pueblo and Tony (Jill) Ramirez of West Jordan, Utah- sister-in-law, Claudette (Rick) Fagerstedt of Pueblo. Also survived by numerous aunts and uncles, including Carolyn (Jim) Koen and Sonny Theis, both of Pueblo, and Sally (Lloyd) Hastings of Dunnigan, Calif., and fellow officers in law enforcement. Born Sept. 26, 1965, in Pueblo and was a lifetime Pueblo resident. Shawn graduated from Central in 1984. In 1986-88, he served his country in the U. S. Navy. Shawn earned an AA degree in 1991 from CC, a BA degree in 1995 from USC and a Master's degree in Organizational Science in 1998 from University of Phoenix. He was a seven-year veteran of the Pueblo County Sheriff's Department and was named officer of the year in 1997 and in 1998 was honored for doubling the department's one-year record for DUI arrests. Shawn will lie in state at the funeral home from noon until 7 .m. Monday. The casket will not be open at the church. Funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 17, 1999, at Praise Assembly of God, 2000 Troy, with Pastor Bobby J. Wilson and Rev. Jesse Sena officiating. Interment will follow at Roselawn Cemetery. In lieu of food and flowers, memorials may be made to the Amanda Theis Trust Fund through the funeral home.

Thesing, Florence E.
Florence E. Thesing - Pueblo Chieftain - March 29, 2000 - Florence E. Thesing of Gaithersburg, Md., died on March 27, 2000. Beloved wife of the late Wilbert J. Thesing. Loving mother of Shirley Wyatt; sister of Lewis McCullough and Shirley Rothkamm; grandmother of Tyler, Eugena and Shannon; and eight great-grandchildren. Services will be held in Gaithersburg. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to: Mission of Mercy, P.O. Box 102, 34 Steelmans St., Suite B., Fairfield, PA, 17320-010.

Thessen, Dale W.
Dale W. Thessen - Pueblo Chieftain - November 10, 1987 - Dale W. Thessen, Star Route 1, Box 12 C, Boswell, Ark. 72516, formerly of Pueblo, died Oct. 29, 1987. Retired from the Pueblo Army Depot. Survived by wife, Mary Lee; daughter, Dayle MacCormack, Pueblo, Pamela Phillips, Colorado City; sons, John S., Miami, Michael S., Rye, and David G., Frankfort, Germany; sister, Evelyn Brummond, Mills, Wyo.; and eight grandchildren. Services were held in Calico Rock, Ark. Memorials may be sent to The Rocky Mountain Heart Research Institute, 1955 Pennsylvania St., Suite 205, Denver, Colo. 80203.

Theuerkauff, August
August Theuerkauff – Pueblo Colorado Weekly Chieftain – September 7, 1876 – Four Men Killed by Foul Air in Gilpin County – The Central Register says that on Tuesday morning, August 20, about half-past ten o'clock, a boy about fourteen years old, named Fred Theuerkauff, descended into the Gray mine, long abandoned, in Lake gulch, the shaft being about seventy-five feet deep, to examine it with a view of seeing whether it could be worked. Being absent for a longer time than seemed necessary, or was expected, his brother August (the family living near by) and his father went to look for him. August at once descended into the shaft, and also being detained a long time, the father became alarmed for his safety, and himself went down. The mother and daughter knowing what had occurred, became frightened in turn and aroused the neighborhood. Among the volunteers was John Cox, an old miner, who took a rope and went to the bottom of the shaft. He soon called for more rope, which was given him. The men on the surface hearing nothing further, pulled up the rope, when it was discovered that all four men were at the bottom and probably stifled by bad air. No more volunteers could be obtained, and a courier was sent to Central City for assistance and means to inject pure air in the shaft, so that the bodies might be recovered. Robert Hastle spread the alarm in town, and soon a number of citizens were mounted and left for the scene of the disaster, Dr. Aduddle and Wohlgesinger, Thos. Mullen, J. D. Wood and others accompanying him. Arriving at the shaft, hose was inserted into the shaft with a large bellows attached, and fresh air pumped in. Mr. Mullen then called for volunteers to descend and recover the bodies. A dozen at once stepped forward, Wm. C. Miller was selected to make the descent. He took a rope with him, attached it to the body of Fred Theuerkauff, Sr., and gave the order to hoist, when the dead and the living came out together. Wm. Batchelder then descended, and in due time he, with the body of A. Theuerkauff, were raised to the surface. Mr. Leary was the third volunteer, and brought out Fred Theuerkauff, Jr. Charles Batchelder was the fourth volunteer, and came out with the body of John Cox. The physicians did everything in their power to resuscitate the unfortunate victims, but without avail. They had evidently died almost instantly after reaching the bottom of the shaft. The scene at the opening was almost heartrending as the corpses were brought up. The coroner's inquest was subsequently held and a verdict rendered that the deceased came to their death by the effects of foul air, as above described. Mr. Cox had been married but a short time, and leaves a young wife to mourn his loss.

Theuerkauff, Fred Jr.
Fred Theuerkauff Jr. – Pueblo Colorado Weekly Chieftain – September 7, 1876 – Four Men Killed by Foul Air in Gilpin County – The Central Register says that on Tuesday morning, August 20, about half-past ten o'clock, a boy about fourteen years old, named Fred Theuerkauff, descended into the Gray mine, long abandoned, in Lake gulch, the shaft being about seventy-five feet deep, to examine it with a view of seeing whether it could be worked. Being absent for a longer time than seemed necessary, or was expected, his brother August (the family living near by) and his father went to look for him. August at once descended into the shaft, and also being detained a long time, the father became alarmed for his safety, and himself went down. The mother and daughter knowing what had occurred, became frightened in turn and aroused the neighborhood. Among the volunteers was John Cox, an old miner, who took a rope and went to the bottom of the shaft. He soon called for more rope, which was given him. The men on the surface hearing nothing further, pulled up the rope, when it was discovered that all four men were at the bottom and probably stifled by bad air. No more volunteers could be obtained, and a courier was sent to Central City for assistance and means to inject pure air in the shaft, so that the bodies might be recovered. Robert Hastle spread the alarm in town, and soon a number of citizens were mounted and left for the scene of the disaster, Dr. Aduddle and Wohlgesinger, Thos. Mullen, J. D. Wood and others accompanying him. Arriving at the shaft, hose was inserted into the shaft with a large bellows attached, and fresh air pumped in. Mr. Mullen then called for volunteers to descend and recover the bodies. A dozen at once stepped forward, Wm. C. Miller was selected to make the descent. He took a rope with him, attached it to the body of Fred Theuerkauff, Sr., and gave the order to hoist, when the dead and the living came out together. Wm. Batchelder then descended, and in due time he, with the body of A. Theuerkauff, were raised to the surface. Mr. Leary was the third volunteer, and brought out Fred Theuerkauff, Jr. Charles Batchelder was the fourth volunteer, and came out with the body of John Cox. The physicians did everything in their power to resuscitate the unfortunate victims, but without avail. They had evidently died almost instantly after reaching the bottom of the shaft. The scene at the opening was almost heartrending as the corpses were brought up. The coroner's inquest was subsequently held and a verdict rendered that the deceased came to their death by the effects of foul air, as above described. Mr. Cox had been married but a short time, and leaves a young wife to mourn his loss.

Theuerkauff, Fred Sr.
Fred Theuerkauff Sr. – Pueblo Colorado Weekly Chieftain – September 7, 1876 – Four Men Killed by Foul Air in Gilpin County – The Central Register says that on Tuesday morning, August 20, about half-past ten o'clock, a boy about fourteen years old, named Fred Theuerkauff, descended into the Gray mine, long abandoned, in Lake gulch, the shaft being about seventy-five feet deep, to examine it with a view of seeing whether it could be worked. Being absent for a longer time than seemed necessary, or was expected, his brother August (the family living near by) and his father went to look for him. August at once descended into the shaft, and also being detained a long time, the father became alarmed for his safety, and himself went down. The mother and daughter knowing what had occurred, became frightened in turn and aroused the neighborhood. Among the volunteers was John Cox, an old miner, who took a rope and went to the bottom of the shaft. He soon called for more rope, which was given him. The men on the surface hearing nothing further, pulled up the rope, when it was discovered that all four men were at the bottom and probably stifled by bad air. No more volunteers could be obtained, and a courier was sent to Central City for assistance and means to inject pure air in the shaft, so that the bodies might be recovered. Robert Hastle spread the alarm in town, and soon a number of citizens were mounted and left for the scene of the disaster, Dr. Aduddle and Wohlgesinger, Thos. Mullen, J. D. Wood and others accompanying him. Arriving at the shaft, hose was inserted into the shaft with a large bellows attached, and fresh air pumped in. Mr. Mullen then called for volunteers to descend and recover the bodies. A dozen at once stepped forward, Wm. C. Miller was selected to make the descent. He took a rope with him, attached it to the body of Fred Theuerkauff, Sr., and gave the order to hoist, when the dead and the living came out together. Wm. Batchelder then descended, and in due time he, with the body of A. Theuerkauff, were raised to the surface. Mr. Leary was the third volunteer, and brought out Fred Theuerkauff, Jr. Charles Batchelder was the fourth volunteer, and came out with the body of John Cox. The physicians did everything in their power to resuscitate the unfortunate victims, but without avail. They had evidently died almost instantly after reaching the bottom of the shaft. The scene at the opening was almost heartrending as the corpses were brought up. The coroner's inquest was subsequently held and a verdict rendered that the deceased came to their death by the effects of foul air, as above described. Mr. Cox had been married but a short time, and leaves a young wife to mourn his loss.

Thiebaut, William
William "Billy" Thiebaut - Pueblo Chieftain - June 17, 2004 - William "Billy" Thiebaut, 81, passed away June 15, 2004. Born Aug. 21, 1922, in Santa Fe, N.M. Survived by his loving wife of 64 years, Evelyn Ruth Thiebaut; children, Teresa Rose Middelkamp of Phoenix, Ariz., and William "Bill" (Mary Ann) Thiebaut Jr. of Pueblo, Colo.; grandchildren, Michael (Ginger) Middelkamp, Rodney Middelkamp, KristiAnne (Corey) Middelkamp, Douglas Middelkamp, Frances (Randy) Thiebaut-Romero, Christina Thiebaut, Jennifer Thiebaut, Elizabeth (Jon) Cushman, William (Laurie) Thiebaut III, Emily Sue (Gary) McDermott, Mark (Terra) Thiebaut, Rebecca (Nate) Erickson, Melissa Thiebaut, Timothy (Ambrey) Thiebaut, Hilary Thiebaut, Sarah Thiebaut, Katherine Thiebaut, Molly Thiebaut and Thomas Jefferson Thiebaut; great-grandchildren, Kayla Thiebaut, Jessica Thiebaut, Randy Romero, Raelyn Romero, Karlee Thiebaut, Mark Thiebaut Jr., Hannah Cushman, Cade Cushman, Zachary Cushman and Vivi Ann McDermott. Preceded in death by his parents, Alfonse and Teresa Thiebaut. A flag of the United States of America was flown over the Colorado State Capitol on Oct. 5, 2001, and presented to William Thiebaut Sr. ("Private First Class Billy Thiebaut") in recognition for his heroic service to this nation during World War II, exemplifying the pure spirit of patriotism. Billy Thiebaut enlisted in the Regular Army in 1940 and trained in boot camp at Fort Rosecrans in San Diego, Calif., and then was stationed at many military installations. Just prior to training for the European Theater at Fort Bliss, Texas, he was awarded the Bronze Battle Star in Alaska and also was acting provost sergeant for the military police in Anchorage. After arriving in England on the Queen Mary, he crossed the English Channel to Le Havre, France, where he joined the Fifteenth Army. He crossed the Ruhr River and then the Rhine River under fire. Among many campaigns and house-to-house fighting he encountered, Billy was involved in the Battle of the Bulge, the liberation of Dachau Concentration Camp in 1945, occupied Hitler's retreat "Berchtesgaden," and served under Gen. Patton's Third Army. He received the following awards: Army of Occupation, Germany; European-Africa-Middle Eastern Campaign with three Battle Bronze Stars; and American Defense (Asiatic Pacific) with one Battle Bronze Star. Retired manager of American National Insurance Co. in Pueblo, Colo. Bill was an enthusiastic outdoorsman. Bill was an adoring husband, a loving father and a model grandfather and great-grandfather. He was happiest when surrounded by his family. He loved life to the fullest. He always was thinking of others before himself, even in his last moments. And as a teacher, he gave his family the greatest of lessons - to live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die. There will be no viewing. Recitation of the rosary, 7 p.m. Thursday, June 17, 2004, at Christ the King Catholic Church, 1708 Horseshoe Drive, in Pueblo, with the Rev. Father Ronald Roche officiating. A family funeral Mass at St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe, N.M., will precede the interment at the National Cemetery in Santa Fe on Friday, June 18, 2004, with full military honors. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Fuente de Vida at Sangre de Cristo Hospice in memory of Bill through the funeral home. The family wishes to thank Parkview Medical Center staff, attending physicians, and Fuente de Vida at Sangre de Cristo Hospice for all their caring, love and support throughout Bill's illness.

Thielbar, Elizabeth M.
Elizabeth M. Thielbar - Pueblo Chieftain - June 16, 2002 - Elizabeth M. Thielbar passed away June 12, 2002, in Las Animas. A longtime Pueblo resident, she was born Nov. 25, 1915, in Sugar City, Colo. Kind and generous, she loved people, especially children, animals, cooking, canning, crocheting and her garden. Elizabeth was preceded in death by her husband, Frank S. Thielbar Sr.; grandson, Ricky Collins; parents, Peter and Annie Brown; and siblings, Katie Lorenzino, Emma Mayfield, Amelia Brown, Philip Brown and Peter Brown. She is survived by her children, Rose (Joe) Ferrell of Las Animas and Rick (Karen) Thielbar of Pueblo; grandsons, Ryan Thielbar of Michigan and Matthew Thielbar of Pueblo; siblings, Edward Brown and Pauline Pretiger, both of New Mexico; stepchildren, Frank Thielbar Jr. of Williamsburg, Barbara Hunter of Nevada and Blanche McCaslin of Utah; as well as numerous nephews, nieces and step-grandchildren. Cremation in the Davis Crematory. A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 29, 2002, in the Davis Memorial Chapel.

Thielbar, Frank S.
Frank S. Thielbar - Pueblo Chieftain - February 05, 1998 - Frank S. Thielbar passed away Feb. 2, 1998, in Pueblo. Frank was born on July 6, 1907, in Sugar City, Colo., and had lived in Pueblo most of his life. He was employed as a plumber until his retirement in 1972. Frank was a member of the Boulevard Christian Church and the Plumbers Local Union No. 20. Mr. Thielbar is survived by his wife of nearly 48 years, Elizabeth- two sons, Frank Thielbar Jr. and Rick (Karin) Thielbar, all of Pueblo- daughters, Barbara Hunter of Utah, Blanche McCaslin of Nevada and Rose (Joe) Ferrell of Las Animas- a brother, Harry Thielbar of Arizona- as well as numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Mr. Thielbar will lie in state from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. on Friday at the mortuary. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 7, 1998, in the Boulevard Christian Church, 2111 S. Pueblo Blvd. Interment will follow in the Mountain View Cemetery.

Thielbar, Olean Geneva
Olean Geneva Thielbar - Pueblo Chieftain - July 13, 1997 - Olean Geneva Thielbar, 69, was born Oct. 21, 1927, and left us to be with our Lord on July 11, 1997. Survived by her husband, Frank S. Thielbar Jr. - her daughters, Crystal Lee (Larry) Riegle, Connie Jo (Andy) Gutierrez and Jodi Machell (Greg) Halverson- two stepsons, Larry Thielbar and Jeff (Lori) Thielbar- two brothers, Roy and Calvin Kinney- her sister, Pauline (Bob) Repasky- as well as 13 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Mrs. Thielbar was a member of Temple Baptist Church where the funeral will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday with interment to follow at Mountain View Cemetery. Viewing hours are noon to 5 p.m. today and 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. Arrangements by McCarthy-Comer Rose Chapel, 329 Goodnight Ave.

Thielemier, Freeda Joycelene
Freeda Joycelene Thielemier - Pueblo Chieftain - May 02, 2006 - Freeda Joycelene Thielemier, 78, of Pueblo passed away on April 29, 2006. Freeda is survived by her children Tom (Dori) Thielemier, Tim (Debbie) Thielemier, Ted (Sandy) Thielemier, Randy (Jackie) Thielemier, Troy (Robin) Thielemier; and Martin Thielemier who was married to her for 56 years; grandchildren, Brian, Aaron, Anita, David, Susan, James, Paul, Maelyn, Jaymie, Cassey Lee, Scott, Dan, Katelyn, Clint, Cindy, Jay, numerous great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by her mother; Mayme Brown; her father Tom Brown and her brother Gerald Brown. Freeda was born on October 15, 1927 in Pocahontas, Ark. She worked as a Psychiatric Technician at the Colorado Mental Health Institute. Freeda and Martin raised five boys together. Freeda's greatest joys in life were her grandchildren whom she adored. By her request Freeda will be cremated with no public service.

Thiess, Fred
Fred Thiess - Yuma Pioneer - February 4, 1910 - Primero Coal Mine Disaster - Horrible Gas Explosion in Colorado Fuel & Iron Company's Mine - May Be Over 100 Dead - Rescue Workers Find Twenty-Four Dead Bodies and One Man Alive - Primero, Colo., Feb. 1 (Tuesday) - Over 100 men are believed killed by a terrific explosion in the Primero mine of the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company at 4:30 yesterday afternoon. Note: Fred Thiess is listed among the dead of the Primero Mine disaster of January 31, 1910 through the Denver Public Library's collection entitled "Colorado Mining Fatalities." It lists Fred Thiess as a German, age 40, and married. He was working as a "timberman" for Colorado Fuel & Iron, and the cause of death was listed as an explosion of gas and dust. For complete coverage of this disaster go to: http://www.kmitch.com/Huerfano/primero.html



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