The Tri-County Obituary Project

Huerfano County, Pueblo County, and Las Animas County, Colorado.



The Tri-County Obituary Project Coordinator is Louise Adams .
This page contributed by Karen Mitchell.

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Haraguchi, E.
E. Haraguchi - Basalt Journal - April 6, 1907 - E. Haraguchi and K. Kusubara, Japanese miners, while at work in the Green Canon coal mine, four miles west of Aguilar, were buried and almost instantly killed by a fall of rock. The supporting timbers were not strong enough to hold up the roof.

Harbert, Betty Jeanne
Betty Jeanne Harbert - Pueblo Chieftain - January 18, 1998 - Betty Jeanne Harbert, 75, of Pueblo, went to be with the Lord on Jan. 15, 1998. Betty loved helping others and donated much of her time to the Easter Seals organization. She also worked on eliminating architectural barriers for the handicapped in the city of Pueblo. Her concern for others was always apparent during the holidays- if she knew someone who was to be alone, she made every effort to invite them for dinner, or comfort them in some way. She is preceded in death by her husband, George- and parents, Paul and Esther Overmyer. Survived by sons, Rick (Sandy) Harbert, Randy (Bonnie) Harbert- daughter, Judi (Doug) Shriver- grandchildren, Darin, Stacy, Eric, Kristopher, Aaron and Chelsey- sister, Joanne (Leroy) Smith- nephew, Kevin (Becky) Smith- and niece, Sheryl (Gary) Herbst. Visitation at the funeral home Sunday from 1 until 5 p.m. Funeral service, 1 p.m. Monday at First Baptist Church, Ninth and Grand. Interment at Mountain View Cemetery. The family suggests that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Easter Seal Society, P.O. Box 1014, Pueblo, Colo. 81002. The family may be contacted at 5 Sweetpea Court.

Harbert, Richard David
Richard David (Dick) Harbert - Pueblo Chieftain - August 07, 2005 - Richard David (Dick) Harbert, 72, passed away Aug. 3, 2005 at Corwin Hospital. He was preceded in death by his daughter Julie Cash, his parents: Davy and Zora Harbert, three brothers Jim, Carl and Don and one sister Margaret Heussmann. He leaves to mourn his passing his wife Imo, daughter: Shari (Sam) Ingo, four grandchildren: Tura (Jeff) Cowan, Sam (Melinda) Ingo, Kate Ingo, special friend: Kriyah Smith and Dallas Cash, five great grandchildren: Dakota Cowan, Jake, Caleb, Amaya and Ethan Ingo, two brothers: Keith of Australia and Bob of Longmont, Colo and three sisters: Fern Dillman of Pahrump, NV, Opal Davis of Azle, TX, and Joyce (Tom) Daschke of Lake Ariel, PA, numerous other relatives and a host of friends. There will be a private memorial service Sat., Aug. 13, 2005.

Harbour, Agnes Ann
Agnes Ann Harbour - Pueblo Chieftain - November 04, 2001 - Agnes Ann Harbour, age 83, born Feb. 4, 1918, passed away Oct. 29, 2001. Mrs. Harbour is preceded in death by her husband, Stanley Harbour; parents, Anton and Johana Zakrajsek; brothers and sisters, Frank (Angela) Zakrasick, Mary (John) Masser, Ted (Pat) Zakrajsek, Sylvia (John) Oreskovich and Jenny Zakrajsek. She is survived by brothers, John (Betty) Zakrajsek and Joe (Pat) Zakrajsek. Agnes spent many happy years living with Joe and Pat before entering Columbine Manor in Salida, Colo. She had many cherished nephews and nieces who enriched her life, Don (Marge) Zakrasick, Nadine (Frank) Habich, Bob (deceased) and Joanne Masser, Lillian Cotton (deceased), Fred (Elsie) Masser, Kathy Zakrajsek, John (Diane) Oreskovich, Gary (Virgie) Oreskovich, Larry Zakrajsek and Dan Zakrajsek, Michael (Stephanie) Burns, David (Kathy) Burns, Jay Burns, Kelly Burns and Chris Burns (deceased). At her request, cremation, Almont Crematory. Graveside inurnment, 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 5, 2001, Roselawn Cemetery. The family will receive friends at the Roselawn Reception Hall following the service.

Harbour, Frances
Frances Harbour - Pueblo Chieftain - February 20, 2001 - Frances Harbour, 79, lifetime Pueblo resident, passed away Feb. 19, 2001. She is preceded in death by her loving husband of 49 years, John Ross Harbour; sisters, Olga (Aubrey) Vaughn, Mary (Mike) McCarthy, Martha Barker; brother, Ludwig Barker; sister in-law, Dorothy Barker. Frances is survived by son, John R. Harbour; daughter, Sharon (Gene) Drake; brothers, Joseph and Harry Barker; nephew, Bill McCarthy; niece, Joann (Jim) Warren; great-niece, Kim (George Abeyta) Warren. Visitation, 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home. Funeral service, 2 p.m. Thursday, T.G. McCarthy Rose Chapel. Interment at Roselawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Sangre de Cristo Hospice at 704 Elmhurst Place, Pueblo, CO 81004.

Hardie, James Finley Jr.
James Finley Hardie Jr. - Pueblo Chieftain - November 19, 1998 - James Finley Hardie Jr., passed away at his home in Pueblo West. Mr. Hardie was a retired chaplain from the State Hospital of Pueblo and Milledgeville, Ga., graduating from Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary and Austin College of Sherman, Texas. He was also an avid bridge player. Survived by nieces: Martina (David) Davis and daughter, Catherine of Montgomery, Texas- Beverly (Larry) Jacobs and children, Tyler Jacobs and Shana Shivers of Magnolia, Texas- Lisa (Randy) Felts and daughters, Rebekah and Jackie, and son, William Felts of Conroe, Texas. Preceded in death by parents, Dr. James Finley and Martha Dickson Hardie- and sister, Maybelle Hardie Smith. , 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, 1998, First Presbyterian Church. Those who wish may make donations to Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 100 E. 27th Street, Austin, Texas, 78705.

Hardin, Antoinette
Antoinette "Toni" Hardin - Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 28, 1976 - Escapee Kills Five; Takes His Own Life - A 23-year-old Colorado State Penitentiary inmate shot himself to death Friday afternoon after a rampage of murder and rape that resulted in the mass slaying of a five-member family in their three-bedroom ranch house a mile south of Penrose. Richard Joseph Turner, who killed all five members of the John E. Hardin family Thursday night, was found shot to death in a stolen pickup truck, Friday afternoon about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest, near Ft. Morgan, roughly 200 miles from the scene of Thursday's murders. Turner died of a gunshot wound from a .22-caliber pistol as sheriff's officers closed in on him after a manhunt that started about 10:30 a.m. Friday, shortly after the bodies of the Hardin family were discovered in their blood-spattered home. Turner, serving an indeterminate-to-five-year sentence for a 1975 Morgan County conviction of "gross sexual imposition," was a trusty at the Fremont County Jail. He was placed there last November for protective custody. Turner was on a work detail at the Hardin ranch at the time of the slayings. Gov. Richard Lamm has ordered an investigation into the circumstances that led to Turner being granted trusty status by Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti. The victims were identified as John E. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard who worked in the prison's minimum security section; his wife, Antoinette, or "Toni," 37; and their three children: Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James 2. Authorities said Mrs. Hardin and her two daughters were sexually molested, or raped. Officers said that while fleeing to Ft. Morgan, near his home, Turner took an elderly farm woman and two young girls hostage and raped one of the girls, who was 14 years old. The bodies of Hardin and his wife were found about 9:30 a.m. Friday when a telephone repairman, responding to a phone-off-the-hook service call, opened the garage door. When Fremont County Sheriff's deputies arrived, they found the infant's body in a front bedroom, and the bodies of the teenaged girls in separate bedrooms. Fremont County Coroner Henry Grabow said that late Friday it was known definitely that only one of the victims, one of the daughters, suffered a gunshot wound. He said the scene was so bloody and the wounds were so extensive, that it will take some time to determine if more bullet wounds were involved. He noted that one of the girls had a badly bruised arm, and though he ruled out possible use of a knife, Grabow said the assailant may have also used a weapon other than a gun - perhaps a "blunt" instrument, he said. Grabow said there was no evidence of a struggle. The Hardin children were found in night clothes and the parents were dressed in day clothes, he said. The females were found partially undressed. Grabow said that from his preliminary investigation, "I would guess that everybody was killed before they were (sexually) molested. At least it appears that way." Authorities have not determined the exact time of death, however there is reason to believe that some of the murders occurred about 10:30 p.m. Apparently Hardin and his wife left Turner with their children to go out for a while. The children were apparently killed in the meantime and when the parents returned, the parents were killed while parking their vehicle in the garage. Neighbors were quoted as saying that their dogs barked because of some disturbance about 10:30 p.m. No neighbors heard shots, however. Karl Hodgson, the Mountain Bell employe who first came upon the murder scene, said he first grew suspicious when he found a fun laying on the front yard of the ranch house. Authorities said the gun was a .357 magnum service revolver believed owned by Hardin. But when deputies entered the house, they found that a gun case had been broken into and many other handguns and a number of rifles had been taken. It is believed Turner made his getaway from Fremont County using a 1972 yellow four-wheel-drive pickup truck stolen from Hardin's house. Officers said it is believed to be the truck Turner shot himself in. Thursday's manhunt narrowed when a ranch wife in Morgan County reported to sheriff's officers that a red-haired man driving a four-wheel drive pickup tried to drive across her property. The truck was spotted again north of Sterling, northeast of Ft. Morgan, where the elderly woman and two girls were taken hostage. Turner raped the 14-year-old in a barn, then left alone, officers said. A short while later, Morgan County Deputy Sheriff Leo Barker came upon the vehicle which had overheated and stalled about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest. A farmer, Burlie Segelke, had stopped minutes earlier and tried to get the vehicle started by pushing it. Barker said he ordered Segelke to approach him, then heard a shot inside the cab of the pickup truck. He found Turner dead of a head wound. Barker said he found the pistol, five rifles and a shotgun in the cab. Most of the weapons were cocked and ready to fire, he said. Apparently the weapons were those taken from the Hardin residence. A search airplane with Colorado Bureau of Investigation agents aboard landed in a nearby field just after Turner died. Turner was sentenced in Morgan County to a five-year-to-indefinite sentence at the state prison after pleading guilty to a charge of "gross sexual imposition." That plea was made to a reduced charge stemming from charges of rape and menacing in September 1974 after two teenaged girls from Grand Rapids, Mich., told officers he picked them up in his car near Brush and attacked them on a rural road south of Ft. Morgan. Records also show that in September 1975, while on furlough from the state prison, Turner was charged with assault and battery on a state patrolman at Ft. Morgan after the patrolman stopped his car for a traffic check. Turner was moved from the maximum security unit at the state prison to the Fremont County Jail last Nov. 20 after he witnessed the slaying of another inmate. Turner was released as a trustee to work bailing hay on Hardin's ranch house property. However, it is not known why jail officials did not discover Turner's absence Thursday night. Fremont County Undersheriff Don Cook said the county jail only had one other penitentiary inmate in its custody besides Turner, and that "it's been the practice in the past for these inmates to return to the jail after they have finished working for the day." He said, "I don't know what the arrangement the Sheriff (John Vernetti) made in Turner's case." Vernetti was not at the scene of the murders when reporters were present, and efforts to reach him Friday were unsuccessful. Cook said Vernetti spent much of the day trying to find Hardin's parents, who live in a remote area between Canon City and Westcliffe. The parents were found late in the afternoon. According to Jerry Agee, chief of the state corrections department, Turner was placed on trusty basis Thursday by the sheriff's office and was released to work on Hardin's ranch. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 1, 1976 - Friends Still Asking 'Why?' As Hardin Family is Buried - When Death strikes down the innocent and young, for every fragile form from which he lets the panting spirit free, a hundred virtues rise, in shapes of mercy, charity, and love, to walk the world, and bless it. - Charles Dickens. Rye - Perhaps the anger was still evident deep inside the mourners of the John E. Hardin family. If is was, it was shrouded by sadness for the five slain members. Still the faces of the large gathering expressed disbelief, shock and the tragic realization that their former neighbors and friends were being put to rest. The caskets of Mr. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard, his wife, Antoinette (Toni), 35 and their three children, Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James, 3, were lined up before the approximately 500 in attendance. The funeral services were held Tuesday at the Rye High School gymnasium, the town where Mr. Hardin grew up. Officiating were the Rev. Paul Leaming and Father Ronald Roche. Following the services, interment services were held at the Rye Cemetery. Survivors include Mr. Hardin's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin; two daughters by a previous marriage, Janda Sue and Bobbi Jean; two brothers, Frank and Jack Hardin and a sister, Susan Kiner. Mrs. Hardin is survived by her father, Esetuiel Baca; her mother Mrs. Celco Savala; two sons from a previous marriage, Larry and Troy Sanchez; four sisters, Mrs. Stella Castro, Gloria Alarid, Theresa Arudder, and Louise Whitcomb; four brothers, Richardo, Joseph, and Robert Baca and Tim Savala. The tragic events which led to Tuesday's funeral began to unfold last Friday when the family was found murdered in its Penrose home near Canon City. Richard Joseph Turner, who was working on furlough for the Hardins, as a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate, was the object of a state-wide search. He was found shot to death by his own hand, in a stolen pickup truck Friday afternoon near Fort Morgan as sheriff's officers closed in. The mourners paid their final respects to the Hardin family in the tiny town located southwest of Pueblo. Their faces still expressed the question, "Why?" Whatever the reason, or reasons, the killings prompted Gov. Richard Lamm to call a special session of the Colorado Legislature to work out a new plan to increase security at the state's penal institutions. But for the slain family, relatives and friends, it seemed of little consequence Monday. Following the services, the caskets were rolled out to the waiting hearses. As the mourners watched and comforted the family's survivors the bearers, the Fremont County Sheriff's Posse, first carried out the casket of Carol. Lori and her mother were next, then Jimmy and his father, whose casket was draped with the American flag. The tragedy had stunned the state and the funeral drew a few newspeople who, while realizing the touchy and sad situation, were not entirely welcome. A television cameraman, he related later, was approached by a member of the Hardin family and asked, "Why can't you (the news media) leave things be." A newspaper photographer was approached by another woman who asked him, "Do you care so much for your job that you have to do this?" The photographer explained that it wasn't his decision and the woman told him, "Tell your editor to go to hell." The tiny cemetery was soon crowded for the final service which concluded with the honor guard presenting the flag to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin - the final possession of their son's, but not the final memory. The large gathering soon departed leaving the Hardins, a family in life, still together as a family in death. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 2, 1976 - Undersheriff Wanted to Resign Prior to Hardin Murders, Sheriff Declares - Canon City - Fremont County Undersheriff Raymond D. "Don" Cooke resigned his post Tuesday stating among his reasons that, "It is my personal opinion that you (Sheriff John Vernetti) are solely to blame for this tragedy because you were aware of Richard Turner's attitude prior to the events of Aug. 27." At a press conference in Canon City Wednesday, Vernetti said Cooke had asked to resign on Aug. 24, four days before the family was killed. "Cooke mentioned that he wanted to resign prior to the Hardin incident. I was in the process of honoring his request," Vernetti said. Hardin, 37, his wife, Antoinette, 35, daughters, Lori, 15, Carol, 13, and son James, 3, were killed Friday by Colorado State Penitentiary inmate Richard J. Turner, who was working at the Hardin ranch on furlough from the Fremont County Sheriff's Department. Turner later killed himself near Fort Morgan as law enforcement officers closed in. In the letter, Cooke blamed Vernetti exclusively for the murders because he said the sheriff had known of Turner's "attitude" prior to the murder. Vernetti responded that he did not know what Cooke had intended by the word - "attitude." "I don't know what Mr. Cooke meant by that statement. While Mr. Turner was here, and before he met with the July parole board, I asked them to run a mental evaluation on him because I thought he had a problem with his temper," Vernetti said. The sheriff said he requested that a test be administered, and that he believed Turner was in the process of psychological evaluation by the West Central Mental Health Clinic in Canon City at the time he killed the Hardin family. Further questions regarding Turner's mental state would have to be referred to the clinic, Vernetti said, adding, "I'm not a psychologist." Vernetti said when Turner was transferred to the county jail for protective custody because he had witnessed a murder, he had asked the penitentiary for his status, and prison officials said Turner was on trusty status. He also quoted a prison investigator, John Snow, as saying, in effect, that co-operation with Turner would help in the case in which Turner was a witness. Snow, earlier in the week, told a reporter that Vernetti had asked for Turner as a trusty because he liked him. Vernetti said the terms of the agreement with the prison were that Turner could not be placed on any work details outside a fenced area without the supervision of a law enforcement officer. Turner was working for Hardin, who was a reserve prison guard as well as a rancher, at the time of the slayings. Vernetti said, however, that officers from his department should have checked on Turner the evening before the slayings when Turner failed to return from the Hardin ranch where he was on work release. He said Turner was due back at the county jail after supper, but a search was not launched for him until after the bodies of the Hardin family were found Friday morning. Asked if he was aware of any time that Turner had violated terms of his work release, authorized Feb. 19, Vernetti said he hadn't. But asked if he knew of an instance in which Turner failed to return to the jail on time while working on a construction project Feb. 27, Vernetti produced a report which showed that Turner was brought back to the jail late that night by deputies who searched for him. The report said Turner admitted to drinking four beers that night. Turner's trusty status prohibited his drinking of alcoholic beverages. Cooke also condemned Vernetti for his association with inmate James Chryslar. Chryslar, on trusty status at the Fremont County Jail, was sentenced in district court Wednesday for burglary, Vernetti said. Cooke's letter said: "Chryslar has taken part in a crime of violence and I feel he is not to be trusted. I personally was involved in an arrest on this man where he stated he would not be taken alive by officers. This man now has the run of the building." Vernetti said he could refute Cooke's charges regarding Chryslar "100 percent." He said the inmate had never participated in a crime of violence in Fremont County. "There is no record. If Mr. Cooke has a record of that he should return it to us because it belongs to the sheriff's department. Chryslar is on a trusty status here. He works only in the jail. He is not on work release or anything else," Vernetti said. Asked if he thought the murders indicated a need for a radical overhaul of policies at the penitentiary, Vernetti said, "I've never been in favor of radical changes. The governor is probably right in what he thinks needs to be done. And the citizens of Fremont County are partly right." The citizens of Canon City and the surrounding area, meanwhile, held a second public meeting Wednesday night with guards at the penitentiary for discussion of a petition drive demanding a grand jury investigation of "the governor's official conduct" with regard to administration of the prison. In addition to that request, the petition requests that the grand jury investigate and make recommendations concerning the following matters: The necessity of appointing a single warden for the prison with single final authority in the administration of the penitentiary; An investigation of the circumstances surrounding the recent release under the work release program of Turner; An investigation and recommendations regarding the conditions inside the penitentiary and the hazardous working conditions of personnel employed there. Ray Shoop, chairman of the petition drive, said guards who attended the meeting were supportive of the action. "The guards see the petition as a tool to get some things done that they've been wanting to get done." Shoop said that the subject of Vernetti's conduct with regard to Turner had not been raised. "This committee is not out head hunting. We just want to get some problems righted. The sheriff's office will be included in the investigation of the circumstances around the murders," he said. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - November 9, 1976 - Survivors of Massacred Family Ask $40 Million in Damages From State - Pueblo - Colorado Atty. Gen. J.D. MacFarlane has been asked to settle claims of $40 million in damages by survivors of the five members of the John Hardin family of Penrose, slain by a prison inmate in late August. Attorney Maurice R. Franks of Westcliffe and Pueblo made the settlement request in a letter required by Colorado law in such cases. The law requires persons seeking damage payments from the state to file a notice of intent within 90 days after the damage was done. Slain on Aug. 26 at their Penrose home were John Hardin, a Colorado State Penitentiary guard; his wife Antoinette; and three children, James Aubrey, 3, Carol, 12, and Laura, 15. The woman and two girls were raped and shot and the boy was beaten to death. The family was slain by Richard Turner, 23, a prison inmate on work release assigned to Hardin who police said killed himself as officers closed in. Turner was on a work release program from Fremont County Jail after being transferred from the medium security unit of the prison as a material witness to an inmate murder. A parole board rating filed last Jan. 8 by Board chairman Gordon Heggle said, "Richard Turner comes through in the interview as the classic rapist. There is no reason in the world to believe that he would not commit the third rape of his life and be arrested and convicted for the third time if he were released," the report said. Turner was sentenced to the prison from Morgan County after his conviction of two counts of gross sexual imposition. Franks said that he represents Inez A. Savala of Rye, the mother of Mrs. Hardin and grandmother of the three dead children; Ronnie Sanchez of Pueblo, father of the slain girls and guardian of two sons who are brothers of the two girls and half-brothers of the boy who was killed; and the two Sanchez boys, Larry and Troy. Franks has been trying to get information from the Colorado Bureau of investigation and from the attorney general to identify "who is responsible for Turner's being free to commit the rapes and the murders." However, Howard Gillespie, agent-in-charge of the CBI in Denver, said the CBI investigation was only of the crime scene and would in no way identify the persons whom the family is seeking. Further, he said, the reports are investigative and not open to the public. The lawyer said the alleged negligence of government officials gives rise to claims under Colorado negligence laws. But, he said, he also believes claims can be filed under the guarantees of equal protection under the law and of due process by the 5th and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The family is seeking $20 million in actual damages, and $20 million in punitive and exemplary damages. Franks said if the claims are not paid, lawsuits will be filed. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 23, 1977 - State Sued for $360 Million - Denver - Relatives and heirs of a five-member Penrose family, murdered last year by an escaped convict, have filed a $360 million damage suit against the state of Colorado and top corrections officials. The filing of the suit Monday in district court came almost one year after John E. Hardin, his wife and three children were found murdered last Aug. 26 in their blood-spattered home. Mrs. Hardin and one of her daughters had been raped. Named as defendants in the suit were the state of Colorado, Gerald Agee, former director of the Colorado Division of Correctional Services; Dr. Raymond Leidig, director of the Colorado Department of Institutions; members of the state penitentiary staff; the Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti, and several members of his staff. Richard Turner, the murderer, a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate who was being held in protective custody in Fremont County Jail, had been released to work in the home of Hardin, a prison guard. Turner fled the area to northeastern Colorado, where he shot and killed himself as law officers closed in near Brush. A grand jury investigating the tragedy last December issued strong reprimands to prison officials who had been involved in Turner's case. The damage suit, filed by Pueblo attorney Maurice Franks, also claims that Gov. Richard Lamm, and officials of the state penal system and the Colorado Bureau of Investigation were involved in a conspiracy in the incident.

Hardin, Carol Ann
Carol Hardin - Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 28, 1976 - Escapee Kills Five; Takes His Own Life - A 23-year-old Colorado State Penitentiary inmate shot himself to death Friday afternoon after a rampage of murder and rape that resulted in the mass slaying of a five-member family in their three-bedroom ranch house a mile south of Penrose. Richard Joseph Turner, who killed all five members of the John E. Hardin family Thursday night, was found shot to death in a stolen pickup truck, Friday afternoon about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest, near Ft. Morgan, roughly 200 miles from the scene of Thursday's murders. Turner died of a gunshot wound from a .22-caliber pistol as sheriff's officers closed in on him after a manhunt that started about 10:30 a.m. Friday, shortly after the bodies of the Hardin family were discovered in their blood-spattered home. Turner, serving an indeterminate-to-five-year sentence for a 1975 Morgan County conviction of "gross sexual imposition," was a trusty at the Fremont County Jail. He was placed there last November for protective custody. Turner was on a work detail at the Hardin ranch at the time of the slayings. Gov. Richard Lamm has ordered an investigation into the circumstances that led to Turner being granted trusty status by Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti. The victims were identified as John E. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard who worked in the prison's minimum security section; his wife, Antoinette, or "Toni," 37; and their three children: Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James 2. Authorities said Mrs. Hardin and her two daughters were sexually molested, or raped. Officers said that while fleeing to Ft. Morgan, near his home, Turner took an elderly farm woman and two young girls hostage and raped one of the girls, who was 14 years old. The bodies of Hardin and his wife were found about 9:30 a.m. Friday when a telephone repairman, responding to a phone-off-the-hook service call, opened the garage door. When Fremont County Sheriff's deputies arrived, they found the infant's body in a front bedroom, and the bodies of the teenaged girls in separate bedrooms. Fremont County Coroner Henry Grabow said that late Friday it was known definitely that only one of the victims, one of the daughters, suffered a gunshot wound. He said the scene was so bloody and the wounds were so extensive, that it will take some time to determine if more bullet wounds were involved. He noted that one of the girls had a badly bruised arm, and though he ruled out possible use of a knife, Grabow said the assailant may have also used a weapon other than a gun - perhaps a "blunt" instrument, he said. Grabow said there was no evidence of a struggle. The Hardin children were found in night clothes and the parents were dressed in day clothes, he said. The females were found partially undressed. Grabow said that from his preliminary investigation, "I would guess that everybody was killed before they were (sexually) molested. At least it appears that way." Authorities have not determined the exact time of death, however there is reason to believe that some of the murders occurred about 10:30 p.m. Apparently Hardin and his wife left Turner with their children to go out for a while. The children were apparently killed in the meantime and when the parents returned, the parents were killed while parking their vehicle in the garage. Neighbors were quoted as saying that their dogs barked because of some disturbance about 10:30 p.m. No neighbors heard shots, however. Karl Hodgson, the Mountain Bell employe who first came upon the murder scene, said he first grew suspicious when he found a fun laying on the front yard of the ranch house. Authorities said the gun was a .357 magnum service revolver believed owned by Hardin. But when deputies entered the house, they found that a gun case had been broken into and many other handguns and a number of rifles had been taken. It is believed Turner made his getaway from Fremont County using a 1972 yellow four-wheel-drive pickup truck stolen from Hardin's house. Officers said it is believed to be the truck Turner shot himself in. Thursday's manhunt narrowed when a ranch wife in Morgan County reported to sheriff's officers that a red-haired man driving a four-wheel drive pickup tried to drive across her property. The truck was spotted again north of Sterling, northeast of Ft. Morgan, where the elderly woman and two girls were taken hostage. Turner raped the 14-year-old in a barn, then left alone, officers said. A short while later, Morgan County Deputy Sheriff Leo Barker came upon the vehicle which had overheated and stalled about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest. A farmer, Burlie Segelke, had stopped minutes earlier and tried to get the vehicle started by pushing it. Barker said he ordered Segelke to approach him, then heard a shot inside the cab of the pickup truck. He found Turner dead of a head wound. Barker said he found the pistol, five rifles and a shotgun in the cab. Most of the weapons were cocked and ready to fire, he said. Apparently the weapons were those taken from the Hardin residence. A search airplane with Colorado Bureau of Investigation agents aboard landed in a nearby field just after Turner died. Turner was sentenced in Morgan County to a five-year-to-indefinite sentence at the state prison after pleading guilty to a charge of "gross sexual imposition." That plea was made to a reduced charge stemming from charges of rape and menacing in September 1974 after two teenaged girls from Grand Rapids, Mich., told officers he picked them up in his car near Brush and attacked them on a rural road south of Ft. Morgan. Records also show that in September 1975, while on furlough from the state prison, Turner was charged with assault and battery on a state patrolman at Ft. Morgan after the patrolman stopped his car for a traffic check. Turner was moved from the maximum security unit at the state prison to the Fremont County Jail last Nov. 20 after he witnessed the slaying of another inmate. Turner was released as a trustee to work bailing hay on Hardin's ranch house property. However, it is not known why jail officials did not discover Turner's absence Thursday night. Fremont County Undersheriff Don Cook said the county jail only had one other penitentiary inmate in its custody besides Turner, and that "it's been the practice in the past for these inmates to return to the jail after they have finished working for the day." He said, "I don't know what the arrangement the Sheriff (John Vernetti) made in Turner's case." Vernetti was not at the scene of the murders when reporters were present, and efforts to reach him Friday were unsuccessful. Cook said Vernetti spent much of the day trying to find Hardin's parents, who live in a remote area between Canon City and Westcliffe. The parents were found late in the afternoon. According to Jerry Agee, chief of the state corrections department, Turner was placed on trusty basis Thursday by the sheriff's office and was released to work on Hardin's ranch. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 1, 1976 - Friends Still Asking 'Why?' As Hardin Family is Buried - When Death strikes down the innocent and young, for every fragile form from which he lets the panting spirit free, a hundred virtues rise, in shapes of mercy, charity, and love, to walk the world, and bless it. - Charles Dickens. Rye - Perhaps the anger was still evident deep inside the mourners of the John E. Hardin family. If is was, it was shrouded by sadness for the five slain members. Still the faces of the large gathering expressed disbelief, shock and the tragic realization that their former neighbors and friends were being put to rest. The caskets of Mr. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard, his wife, Antoinette (Toni), 35 and their three children, Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James, 3, were lined up before the approximately 500 in attendance. The funeral services were held Tuesday at the Rye High School gymnasium, the town where Mr. Hardin grew up. Officiating were the Rev. Paul Leaming and Father Ronald Roche. Following the services, interment services were held at the Rye Cemetery. Survivors include Mr. Hardin's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin; two daughters by a previous marriage, Janda Sue and Bobbi Jean; two brothers, Frank and Jack Hardin and a sister, Susan Kiner. Mrs. Hardin is survived by her father, Esetuiel Baca; her mother Mrs. Celco Savala; two sons from a previous marriage, Larry and Troy Sanchez; four sisters, Mrs. Stella Castro, Gloria Alarid, Theresa Arudder, and Louise Whitcomb; four brothers, Richardo, Joseph, and Robert Baca and Tim Savala. The tragic events which led to Tuesday's funeral began to unfold last Friday when the family was found murdered in its Penrose home near Canon City. Richard Joseph Turner, who was working on furlough for the Hardins, as a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate, was the object of a state-wide search. He was found shot to death by his own hand, in a stolen pickup truck Friday afternoon near Fort Morgan as sheriff's officers closed in. The mourners paid their final respects to the Hardin family in the tiny town located southwest of Pueblo. Their faces still expressed the question, "Why?" Whatever the reason, or reasons, the killings prompted Gov. Richard Lamm to call a special session of the Colorado Legislature to work out a new plan to increase security at the state's penal institutions. But for the slain family, relatives and friends, it seemed of little consequence Monday. Following the services, the caskets were rolled out to the waiting hearses. As the mourners watched and comforted the family's survivors the bearers, the Fremont County Sheriff's Posse, first carried out the casket of Carol. Lori and her mother were next, then Jimmy and his father, whose casket was draped with the American flag. The tragedy had stunned the state and the funeral drew a few newspeople who, while realizing the touchy and sad situation, were not entirely welcome. A television cameraman, he related later, was approached by a member of the Hardin family and asked, "Why can't you (the news media) leave things be." A newspaper photographer was approached by another woman who asked him, "Do you care so much for your job that you have to do this?" The photographer explained that it wasn't his decision and the woman told him, "Tell your editor to go to hell." The tiny cemetery was soon crowded for the final service which concluded with the honor guard presenting the flag to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin - the final possession of their son's, but not the final memory. The large gathering soon departed leaving the Hardins, a family in life, still together as a family in death. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 2, 1976 - Undersheriff Wanted to Resign Prior to Hardin Murders, Sheriff Declares - Canon City - Fremont County Undersheriff Raymond D. "Don" Cooke resigned his post Tuesday stating among his reasons that, "It is my personal opinion that you (Sheriff John Vernetti) are solely to blame for this tragedy because you were aware of Richard Turner's attitude prior to the events of Aug. 27." At a press conference in Canon City Wednesday, Vernetti said Cooke had asked to resign on Aug. 24, four days before the family was killed. "Cooke mentioned that he wanted to resign prior to the Hardin incident. I was in the process of honoring his request," Vernetti said. Hardin, 37, his wife, Antoinette, 35, daughters, Lori, 15, Carol, 13, and son James, 3, were killed Friday by Colorado State Penitentiary inmate Richard J. Turner, who was working at the Hardin ranch on furlough from the Fremont County Sheriff's Department. Turner later killed himself near Fort Morgan as law enforcement officers closed in. In the letter, Cooke blamed Vernetti exclusively for the murders because he said the sheriff had known of Turner's "attitude" prior to the murder. Vernetti responded that he did not know what Cooke had intended by the word - "attitude." "I don't know what Mr. Cooke meant by that statement. While Mr. Turner was here, and before he met with the July parole board, I asked them to run a mental evaluation on him because I thought he had a problem with his temper," Vernetti said. The sheriff said he requested that a test be administered, and that he believed Turner was in the process of psychological evaluation by the West Central Mental Health Clinic in Canon City at the time he killed the Hardin family. Further questions regarding Turner's mental state would have to be referred to the clinic, Vernetti said, adding, "I'm not a psychologist." Vernetti said when Turner was transferred to the county jail for protective custody because he had witnessed a murder, he had asked the penitentiary for his status, and prison officials said Turner was on trusty status. He also quoted a prison investigator, John Snow, as saying, in effect, that co-operation with Turner would help in the case in which Turner was a witness. Snow, earlier in the week, told a reporter that Vernetti had asked for Turner as a trusty because he liked him. Vernetti said the terms of the agreement with the prison were that Turner could not be placed on any work details outside a fenced area without the supervision of a law enforcement officer. Turner was working for Hardin, who was a reserve prison guard as well as a rancher, at the time of the slayings. Vernetti said, however, that officers from his department should have checked on Turner the evening before the slayings when Turner failed to return from the Hardin ranch where he was on work release. He said Turner was due back at the county jail after supper, but a search was not launched for him until after the bodies of the Hardin family were found Friday morning. Asked if he was aware of any time that Turner had violated terms of his work release, authorized Feb. 19, Vernetti said he hadn't. But asked if he knew of an instance in which Turner failed to return to the jail on time while working on a construction project Feb. 27, Vernetti produced a report which showed that Turner was brought back to the jail late that night by deputies who searched for him. The report said Turner admitted to drinking four beers that night. Turner's trusty status prohibited his drinking of alcoholic beverages. Cooke also condemned Vernetti for his association with inmate James Chryslar. Chryslar, on trusty status at the Fremont County Jail, was sentenced in district court Wednesday for burglary, Vernetti said. Cooke's letter said: "Chryslar has taken part in a crime of violence and I feel he is not to be trusted. I personally was involved in an arrest on this man where he stated he would not be taken alive by officers. This man now has the run of the building." Vernetti said he could refute Cooke's charges regarding Chryslar "100 percent." He said the inmate had never participated in a crime of violence in Fremont County. "There is no record. If Mr. Cooke has a record of that he should return it to us because it belongs to the sheriff's department. Chryslar is on a trusty status here. He works only in the jail. He is not on work release or anything else," Vernetti said. Asked if he thought the murders indicated a need for a radical overhaul of policies at the penitentiary, Vernetti said, "I've never been in favor of radical changes. The governor is probably right in what he thinks needs to be done. And the citizens of Fremont County are partly right." The citizens of Canon City and the surrounding area, meanwhile, held a second public meeting Wednesday night with guards at the penitentiary for discussion of a petition drive demanding a grand jury investigation of "the governor's official conduct" with regard to administration of the prison. In addition to that request, the petition requests that the grand jury investigate and make recommendations concerning the following matters: The necessity of appointing a single warden for the prison with single final authority in the administration of the penitentiary; An investigation of the circumstances surrounding the recent release under the work release program of Turner; An investigation and recommendations regarding the conditions inside the penitentiary and the hazardous working conditions of personnel employed there. Ray Shoop, chairman of the petition drive, said guards who attended the meeting were supportive of the action. "The guards see the petition as a tool to get some things done that they've been wanting to get done." Shoop said that the subject of Vernetti's conduct with regard to Turner had not been raised. "This committee is not out head hunting. We just want to get some problems righted. The sheriff's office will be included in the investigation of the circumstances around the murders," he said. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - November 9, 1976 - Survivors of Massacred Family Ask $40 Million in Damages From State - Pueblo - Colorado Atty. Gen. J.D. MacFarlane has been asked to settle claims of $40 million in damages by survivors of the five members of the John Hardin family of Penrose, slain by a prison inmate in late August. Attorney Maurice R. Franks of Westcliffe and Pueblo made the settlement request in a letter required by Colorado law in such cases. The law requires persons seeking damage payments from the state to file a notice of intent within 90 days after the damage was done. Slain on Aug. 26 at their Penrose home were John Hardin, a Colorado State Penitentiary guard; his wife Antoinette; and three children, James Aubrey, 3, Carol, 12, and Laura, 15. The woman and two girls were raped and shot and the boy was beaten to death. The family was slain by Richard Turner, 23, a prison inmate on work release assigned to Hardin who police said killed himself as officers closed in. Turner was on a work release program from Fremont County Jail after being transferred from the medium security unit of the prison as a material witness to an inmate murder. A parole board rating filed last Jan. 8 by Board chairman Gordon Heggle said, "Richard Turner comes through in the interview as the classic rapist. There is no reason in the world to believe that he would not commit the third rape of his life and be arrested and convicted for the third time if he were released," the report said. Turner was sentenced to the prison from Morgan County after his conviction of two counts of gross sexual imposition. Franks said that he represents Inez A. Savala of Rye, the mother of Mrs. Hardin and grandmother of the three dead children; Ronnie Sanchez of Pueblo, father of the slain girls and guardian of two sons who are brothers of the two girls and half-brothers of the boy who was killed; and the two Sanchez boys, Larry and Troy. Franks has been trying to get information from the Colorado Bureau of investigation and from the attorney general to identify "who is responsible for Turner's being free to commit the rapes and the murders." However, Howard Gillespie, agent-in-charge of the CBI in Denver, said the CBI investigation was only of the crime scene and would in no way identify the persons whom the family is seeking. Further, he said, the reports are investigative and not open to the public. The lawyer said the alleged negligence of government officials gives rise to claims under Colorado negligence laws. But, he said, he also believes claims can be filed under the guarantees of equal protection under the law and of due process by the 5th and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The family is seeking $20 million in actual damages, and $20 million in punitive and exemplary damages. Franks said if the claims are not paid, lawsuits will be filed. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 23, 1977 - State Sued for $360 Million - Denver - Relatives and heirs of a five-member Penrose family, murdered last year by an escaped convict, have filed a $360 million damage suit against the state of Colorado and top corrections officials. The filing of the suit Monday in district court came almost one year after John E. Hardin, his wife and three children were found murdered last Aug. 26 in their blood-spattered home. Mrs. Hardin and one of her daughters had been raped. Named as defendants in the suit were the state of Colorado, Gerald Agee, former director of the Colorado Division of Correctional Services; Dr. Raymond Leidig, director of the Colorado Department of Institutions; members of the state penitentiary staff; the Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti, and several members of his staff. Richard Turner, the murderer, a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate who was being held in protective custody in Fremont County Jail, had been released to work in the home of Hardin, a prison guard. Turner fled the area to northeastern Colorado, where he shot and killed himself as law officers closed in near Brush. A grand jury investigating the tragedy last December issued strong reprimands to prison officials who had been involved in Turner's case. The damage suit, filed by Pueblo attorney Maurice Franks, also claims that Gov. Richard Lamm, and officials of the state penal system and the Colorado Bureau of Investigation were involved in a conspiracy in the incident. Pueblo Chieftain - August 29, 1976 - John C., Toni, Laura L., Carol Ann and Jimmie Hardin. Services 1 p.m. Tuesday, Rye High School gymnasium, will be conducted by the Rev. Paul Leaming and Father Ronald Roche. Interment and military committal services, Rye cemetery.

Hardin, Carol J.
Carol J. Hardin - Pueblo Chieftain - July 20, 1976 - Carol J. Hardin, unexpectedly at her home, 3020 E. Bijou, Colorado Springs. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Willard Barnhart, Pueblo. Mother of Gary R. Hardin and Kathy Groff, both of Pueblo. Arrangements will be announced later. Pueblo Chieftain July 21, 1976, unexpectedly, at her home, 3020 E. Bijou, Colorado Springs. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Willard Barnhart, Pueblo. Mother of Gary R. Hardin and Kathy Groff, both of Pueblo. Services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Evergreen Funeral Chapel, with the Rev. Charles Whitmer, pastor of Central Christian Church, officiating. To Roselawn. Those who desire may contribute directly to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 1658, Pueblo, 81003.

Hardin, George E.
George E. Hardin - Pueblo Chieftain - August 20, 1987 - George E. Hardin, a Pueblo resident since 1920, late of 2420 E. Routt, passed away Aug. 18, 1987. Mr. Hardin retired from the PAD and was a lifetime member of the Fin and Feather Club. He is survived by three daughters, Geraldine (Vern) Whited and Una E. (Don) Edwards, both of Pueblo, and Jo Anne (Sid) Carey of Midway City, Calif.; one son, Wilbur G. (Betty) Hardin of San Diego, Calif.; 18 grandchildren; numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren; one sister, Achsah Hardin of Pueblo; and numerous nieces and nephews. The funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday in the Adrian Comer Garden Chapel, with the Rev. Dan Lyons of Grace Community Bible Church officiating. Interment will be at Imperial Memorial Gardens.

Hardin, James Aubrey
James Aubrey "Jimmy" Hardin - Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 28, 1976 - Escapee Kills Five; Takes His Own Life - A 23-year-old Colorado State Penitentiary inmate shot himself to death Friday afternoon after a rampage of murder and rape that resulted in the mass slaying of a five-member family in their three-bedroom ranch house a mile south of Penrose. Richard Joseph Turner, who killed all five members of the John E. Hardin family Thursday night, was found shot to death in a stolen pickup truck, Friday afternoon about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest, near Ft. Morgan, roughly 200 miles from the scene of Thursday's murders. Turner died of a gunshot wound from a .22-caliber pistol as sheriff's officers closed in on him after a manhunt that started about 10:30 a.m. Friday, shortly after the bodies of the Hardin family were discovered in their blood-spattered home. Turner, serving an indeterminate-to-five-year sentence for a 1975 Morgan County conviction of "gross sexual imposition," was a trusty at the Fremont County Jail. He was placed there last November for protective custody. Turner was on a work detail at the Hardin ranch at the time of the slayings. Gov. Richard Lamm has ordered an investigation into the circumstances that led to Turner being granted trusty status by Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti. The victims were identified as John E. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard who worked in the prison's minimum security section; his wife, Antoinette, or "Toni," 37; and their three children: Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James 2. Authorities said Mrs. Hardin and her two daughters were sexually molested, or raped. Officers said that while fleeing to Ft. Morgan, near his home, Turner took an elderly farm woman and two young girls hostage and raped one of the girls, who was 14 years old. The bodies of Hardin and his wife were found about 9:30 a.m. Friday when a telephone repairman, responding to a phone-off-the-hook service call, opened the garage door. When Fremont County Sheriff's deputies arrived, they found the infant's body in a front bedroom, and the bodies of the teenaged girls in separate bedrooms. Fremont County Coroner Henry Grabow said that late Friday it was known definitely that only one of the victims, one of the daughters, suffered a gunshot wound. He said the scene was so bloody and the wounds were so extensive, that it will take some time to determine if more bullet wounds were involved. He noted that one of the girls had a badly bruised arm, and though he ruled out possible use of a knife, Grabow said the assailant may have also used a weapon other than a gun - perhaps a "blunt" instrument, he said. Grabow said there was no evidence of a struggle. The Hardin children were found in night clothes and the parents were dressed in day clothes, he said. The females were found partially undressed. Grabow said that from his preliminary investigation, "I would guess that everybody was killed before they were (sexually) molested. At least it appears that way." Authorities have not determined the exact time of death, however there is reason to believe that some of the murders occurred about 10:30 p.m. Apparently Hardin and his wife left Turner with their children to go out for a while. The children were apparently killed in the meantime and when the parents returned, the parents were killed while parking their vehicle in the garage. Neighbors were quoted as saying that their dogs barked because of some disturbance about 10:30 p.m. No neighbors heard shots, however. Karl Hodgson, the Mountain Bell employe who first came upon the murder scene, said he first grew suspicious when he found a fun laying on the front yard of the ranch house. Authorities said the gun was a .357 magnum service revolver believed owned by Hardin. But when deputies entered the house, they found that a gun case had been broken into and many other handguns and a number of rifles had been taken. It is believed Turner made his getaway from Fremont County using a 1972 yellow four-wheel-drive pickup truck stolen from Hardin's house. Officers said it is believed to be the truck Turner shot himself in. Thursday's manhunt narrowed when a ranch wife in Morgan County reported to sheriff's officers that a red-haired man driving a four-wheel drive pickup tried to drive across her property. The truck was spotted again north of Sterling, northeast of Ft. Morgan, where the elderly woman and two girls were taken hostage. Turner raped the 14-year-old in a barn, then left alone, officers said. A short while later, Morgan County Deputy Sheriff Leo Barker came upon the vehicle which had overheated and stalled about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest. A farmer, Burlie Segelke, had stopped minutes earlier and tried to get the vehicle started by pushing it. Barker said he ordered Segelke to approach him, then heard a shot inside the cab of the pickup truck. He found Turner dead of a head wound. Barker said he found the pistol, five rifles and a shotgun in the cab. Most of the weapons were cocked and ready to fire, he said. Apparently the weapons were those taken from the Hardin residence. A search airplane with Colorado Bureau of Investigation agents aboard landed in a nearby field just after Turner died. Turner was sentenced in Morgan County to a five-year-to-indefinite sentence at the state prison after pleading guilty to a charge of "gross sexual imposition." That plea was made to a reduced charge stemming from charges of rape and menacing in September 1974 after two teenaged girls from Grand Rapids, Mich., told officers he picked them up in his car near Brush and attacked them on a rural road south of Ft. Morgan. Records also show that in September 1975, while on furlough from the state prison, Turner was charged with assault and battery on a state patrolman at Ft. Morgan after the patrolman stopped his car for a traffic check. Turner was moved from the maximum security unit at the state prison to the Fremont County Jail last Nov. 20 after he witnessed the slaying of another inmate. Turner was released as a trustee to work bailing hay on Hardin's ranch house property. However, it is not known why jail officials did not discover Turner's absence Thursday night. Fremont County Undersheriff Don Cook said the county jail only had one other penitentiary inmate in its custody besides Turner, and that "it's been the practice in the past for these inmates to return to the jail after they have finished working for the day." He said, "I don't know what the arrangement the Sheriff (John Vernetti) made in Turner's case." Vernetti was not at the scene of the murders when reporters were present, and efforts to reach him Friday were unsuccessful. Cook said Vernetti spent much of the day trying to find Hardin's parents, who live in a remote area between Canon City and Westcliffe. The parents were found late in the afternoon. According to Jerry Agee, chief of the state corrections department, Turner was placed on trusty basis Thursday by the sheriff's office and was released to work on Hardin's ranch. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 1, 1976 - Friends Still Asking 'Why?' As Hardin Family is Buried - When Death strikes down the innocent and young, for every fragile form from which he lets the panting spirit free, a hundred virtues rise, in shapes of mercy, charity, and love, to walk the world, and bless it. - Charles Dickens. Rye - Perhaps the anger was still evident deep inside the mourners of the John E. Hardin family. If is was, it was shrouded by sadness for the five slain members. Still the faces of the large gathering expressed disbelief, shock and the tragic realization that their former neighbors and friends were being put to rest. The caskets of Mr. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard, his wife, Antoinette (Toni), 35 and their three children, Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James, 3, were lined up before the approximately 500 in attendance. The funeral services were held Tuesday at the Rye High School gymnasium, the town where Mr. Hardin grew up. Officiating were the Rev. Paul Leaming and Father Ronald Roche. Following the services, interment services were held at the Rye Cemetery. Survivors include Mr. Hardin's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin; two daughters by a previous marriage, Janda Sue and Bobbi Jean; two brothers, Frank and Jack Hardin and a sister, Susan Kiner. Mrs. Hardin is survived by her father, Esetuiel Baca; her mother Mrs. Celco Savala; two sons from a previous marriage, Larry and Troy Sanchez; four sisters, Mrs. Stella Castro, Gloria Alarid, Theresa Arudder, and Louise Whitcomb; four brothers, Richardo, Joseph, and Robert Baca and Tim Savala. The tragic events which led to Tuesday's funeral began to unfold last Friday when the family was found murdered in its Penrose home near Canon City. Richard Joseph Turner, who was working on furlough for the Hardins, as a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate, was the object of a state-wide search. He was found shot to death by his own hand, in a stolen pickup truck Friday afternoon near Fort Morgan as sheriff's officers closed in. The mourners paid their final respects to the Hardin family in the tiny town located southwest of Pueblo. Their faces still expressed the question, "Why?" Whatever the reason, or reasons, the killings prompted Gov. Richard Lamm to call a special session of the Colorado Legislature to work out a new plan to increase security at the state's penal institutions. But for the slain family, relatives and friends, it seemed of little consequence Monday. Following the services, the caskets were rolled out to the waiting hearses. As the mourners watched and comforted the family's survivors the bearers, the Fremont County Sheriff's Posse, first carried out the casket of Carol. Lori and her mother were next, then Jimmy and his father, whose casket was draped with the American flag. The tragedy had stunned the state and the funeral drew a few newspeople who, while realizing the touchy and sad situation, were not entirely welcome. A television cameraman, he related later, was approached by a member of the Hardin family and asked, "Why can't you (the news media) leave things be." A newspaper photographer was approached by another woman who asked him, "Do you care so much for your job that you have to do this?" The photographer explained that it wasn't his decision and the woman told him, "Tell your editor to go to hell." The tiny cemetery was soon crowded for the final service which concluded with the honor guard presenting the flag to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin - the final possession of their son's, but not the final memory. The large gathering soon departed leaving the Hardins, a family in life, still together as a family in death. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 2, 1976 - Undersheriff Wanted to Resign Prior to Hardin Murders, Sheriff Declares - Canon City - Fremont County Undersheriff Raymond D. "Don" Cooke resigned his post Tuesday stating among his reasons that, "It is my personal opinion that you (Sheriff John Vernetti) are solely to blame for this tragedy because you were aware of Richard Turner's attitude prior to the events of Aug. 27." At a press conference in Canon City Wednesday, Vernetti said Cooke had asked to resign on Aug. 24, four days before the family was killed. "Cooke mentioned that he wanted to resign prior to the Hardin incident. I was in the process of honoring his request," Vernetti said. Hardin, 37, his wife, Antoinette, 35, daughters, Lori, 15, Carol, 13, and son James, 3, were killed Friday by Colorado State Penitentiary inmate Richard J. Turner, who was working at the Hardin ranch on furlough from the Fremont County Sheriff's Department. Turner later killed himself near Fort Morgan as law enforcement officers closed in. In the letter, Cooke blamed Vernetti exclusively for the murders because he said the sheriff had known of Turner's "attitude" prior to the murder. Vernetti responded that he did not know what Cooke had intended by the word - "attitude." "I don't know what Mr. Cooke meant by that statement. While Mr. Turner was here, and before he met with the July parole board, I asked them to run a mental evaluation on him because I thought he had a problem with his temper," Vernetti said. The sheriff said he requested that a test be administered, and that he believed Turner was in the process of psychological evaluation by the West Central Mental Health Clinic in Canon City at the time he killed the Hardin family. Further questions regarding Turner's mental state would have to be referred to the clinic, Vernetti said, adding, "I'm not a psychologist." Vernetti said when Turner was transferred to the county jail for protective custody because he had witnessed a murder, he had asked the penitentiary for his status, and prison officials said Turner was on trusty status. He also quoted a prison investigator, John Snow, as saying, in effect, that co-operation with Turner would help in the case in which Turner was a witness. Snow, earlier in the week, told a reporter that Vernetti had asked for Turner as a trusty because he liked him. Vernetti said the terms of the agreement with the prison were that Turner could not be placed on any work details outside a fenced area without the supervision of a law enforcement officer. Turner was working for Hardin, who was a reserve prison guard as well as a rancher, at the time of the slayings. Vernetti said, however, that officers from his department should have checked on Turner the evening before the slayings when Turner failed to return from the Hardin ranch where he was on work release. He said Turner was due back at the county jail after supper, but a search was not launched for him until after the bodies of the Hardin family were found Friday morning. Asked if he was aware of any time that Turner had violated terms of his work release, authorized Feb. 19, Vernetti said he hadn't. But asked if he knew of an instance in which Turner failed to return to the jail on time while working on a construction project Feb. 27, Vernetti produced a report which showed that Turner was brought back to the jail late that night by deputies who searched for him. The report said Turner admitted to drinking four beers that night. Turner's trusty status prohibited his drinking of alcoholic beverages. Cooke also condemned Vernetti for his association with inmate James Chryslar. Chryslar, on trusty status at the Fremont County Jail, was sentenced in district court Wednesday for burglary, Vernetti said. Cooke's letter said: "Chryslar has taken part in a crime of violence and I feel he is not to be trusted. I personally was involved in an arrest on this man where he stated he would not be taken alive by officers. This man now has the run of the building." Vernetti said he could refute Cooke's charges regarding Chryslar "100 percent." He said the inmate had never participated in a crime of violence in Fremont County. "There is no record. If Mr. Cooke has a record of that he should return it to us because it belongs to the sheriff's department. Chryslar is on a trusty status here. He works only in the jail. He is not on work release or anything else," Vernetti said. Asked if he thought the murders indicated a need for a radical overhaul of policies at the penitentiary, Vernetti said, "I've never been in favor of radical changes. The governor is probably right in what he thinks needs to be done. And the citizens of Fremont County are partly right." The citizens of Canon City and the surrounding area, meanwhile, held a second public meeting Wednesday night with guards at the penitentiary for discussion of a petition drive demanding a grand jury investigation of "the governor's official conduct" with regard to administration of the prison. In addition to that request, the petition requests that the grand jury investigate and make recommendations concerning the following matters: The necessity of appointing a single warden for the prison with single final authority in the administration of the penitentiary; An investigation of the circumstances surrounding the recent release under the work release program of Turner; An investigation and recommendations regarding the conditions inside the penitentiary and the hazardous working conditions of personnel employed there. Ray Shoop, chairman of the petition drive, said guards who attended the meeting were supportive of the action. "The guards see the petition as a tool to get some things done that they've been wanting to get done." Shoop said that the subject of Vernetti's conduct with regard to Turner had not been raised. "This committee is not out head hunting. We just want to get some problems righted. The sheriff's office will be included in the investigation of the circumstances around the murders," he said. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - November 9, 1976 - Survivors of Massacred Family Ask $40 Million in Damages From State - Pueblo - Colorado Atty. Gen. J.D. MacFarlane has been asked to settle claims of $40 million in damages by survivors of the five members of the John Hardin family of Penrose, slain by a prison inmate in late August. Attorney Maurice R. Franks of Westcliffe and Pueblo made the settlement request in a letter required by Colorado law in such cases. The law requires persons seeking damage payments from the state to file a notice of intent within 90 days after the damage was done. Slain on Aug. 26 at their Penrose home were John Hardin, a Colorado State Penitentiary guard; his wife Antoinette; and three children, James Aubrey, 3, Carol, 12, and Laura, 15. The woman and two girls were raped and shot and the boy was beaten to death. The family was slain by Richard Turner, 23, a prison inmate on work release assigned to Hardin who police said killed himself as officers closed in. Turner was on a work release program from Fremont County Jail after being transferred from the medium security unit of the prison as a material witness to an inmate murder. A parole board rating filed last Jan. 8 by Board chairman Gordon Heggle said, "Richard Turner comes through in the interview as the classic rapist. There is no reason in the world to believe that he would not commit the third rape of his life and be arrested and convicted for the third time if he were released," the report said. Turner was sentenced to the prison from Morgan County after his conviction of two counts of gross sexual imposition. Franks said that he represents Inez A. Savala of Rye, the mother of Mrs. Hardin and grandmother of the three dead children; Ronnie Sanchez of Pueblo, father of the slain girls and guardian of two sons who are brothers of the two girls and half-brothers of the boy who was killed; and the two Sanchez boys, Larry and Troy. Franks has been trying to get information from the Colorado Bureau of investigation and from the attorney general to identify "who is responsible for Turner's being free to commit the rapes and the murders." However, Howard Gillespie, agent-in-charge of the CBI in Denver, said the CBI investigation was only of the crime scene and would in no way identify the persons whom the family is seeking. Further, he said, the reports are investigative and not open to the public. The lawyer said the alleged negligence of government officials gives rise to claims under Colorado negligence laws. But, he said, he also believes claims can be filed under the guarantees of equal protection under the law and of due process by the 5th and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The family is seeking $20 million in actual damages, and $20 million in punitive and exemplary damages. Franks said if the claims are not paid, lawsuits will be filed. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 23, 1977 - State Sued for $360 Million - Denver - Relatives and heirs of a five-member Penrose family, murdered last year by an escaped convict, have filed a $360 million damage suit against the state of Colorado and top corrections officials. The filing of the suit Monday in district court came almost one year after John E. Hardin, his wife and three children were found murdered last Aug. 26 in their blood-spattered home. Mrs. Hardin and one of her daughters had been raped. Named as defendants in the suit were the state of Colorado, Gerald Agee, former director of the Colorado Division of Correctional Services; Dr. Raymond Leidig, director of the Colorado Department of Institutions; members of the state penitentiary staff; the Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti, and several members of his staff. Richard Turner, the murderer, a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate who was being held in protective custody in Fremont County Jail, had been released to work in the home of Hardin, a prison guard. Turner fled the area to northeastern Colorado, where he shot and killed himself as law officers closed in near Brush. A grand jury investigating the tragedy last December issued strong reprimands to prison officials who had been involved in Turner's case. The damage suit, filed by Pueblo attorney Maurice Franks, also claims that Gov. Richard Lamm, and officials of the state penal system and the Colorado Bureau of Investigation were involved in a conspiracy in the incident.

Hardin, John E.
John E. Hardin - Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 28, 1976 - Escapee Kills Five; Takes His Own Life - A 23-year-old Colorado State Penitentiary inmate shot himself to death Friday afternoon after a rampage of murder and rape that resulted in the mass slaying of a five-member family in their three-bedroom ranch house a mile south of Penrose. Richard Joseph Turner, who killed all five members of the John E. Hardin family Thursday night, was found shot to death in a stolen pickup truck, Friday afternoon about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest, near Ft. Morgan, roughly 200 miles from the scene of Thursday's murders. Turner died of a gunshot wound from a .22-caliber pistol as sheriff's officers closed in on him after a manhunt that started about 10:30 a.m. Friday, shortly after the bodies of the Hardin family were discovered in their blood-spattered home. Turner, serving an indeterminate-to-five-year sentence for a 1975 Morgan County conviction of "gross sexual imposition," was a trusty at the Fremont County Jail. He was placed there last November for protective custody. Turner was on a work detail at the Hardin ranch at the time of the slayings. Gov. Richard Lamm has ordered an investigation into the circumstances that led to Turner being granted trusty status by Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti. The victims were identified as John E. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard who worked in the prison's minimum security section; his wife, Antoinette, or "Toni," 37; and their three children: Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James 2. Authorities said Mrs. Hardin and her two daughters were sexually molested, or raped. Officers said that while fleeing to Ft. Morgan, near his home, Turner took an elderly farm woman and two young girls hostage and raped one of the girls, who was 14 years old. The bodies of Hardin and his wife were found about 9:30 a.m. Friday when a telephone repairman, responding to a phone-off-the-hook service call, opened the garage door. When Fremont County Sheriff's deputies arrived, they found the infant's body in a front bedroom, and the bodies of the teenaged girls in separate bedrooms. Fremont County Coroner Henry Grabow said that late Friday it was known definitely that only one of the victims, one of the daughters, suffered a gunshot wound. He said the scene was so bloody and the wounds were so extensive, that it will take some time to determine if more bullet wounds were involved. He noted that one of the girls had a badly bruised arm, and though he ruled out possible use of a knife, Grabow said the assailant may have also used a weapon other than a gun - perhaps a "blunt" instrument, he said. Grabow said there was no evidence of a struggle. The Hardin children were found in night clothes and the parents were dressed in day clothes, he said. The females were found partially undressed. Grabow said that from his preliminary investigation, "I would guess that everybody was killed before they were (sexually) molested. At least it appears that way." Authorities have not determined the exact time of death, however there is reason to believe that some of the murders occurred about 10:30 p.m. Apparently Hardin and his wife left Turner with their children to go out for a while. The children were apparently killed in the meantime and when the parents returned, the parents were killed while parking their vehicle in the garage. Neighbors were quoted as saying that their dogs barked because of some disturbance about 10:30 p.m. No neighbors heard shots, however. Karl Hodgson, the Mountain Bell employe who first came upon the murder scene, said he first grew suspicious when he found a fun laying on the front yard of the ranch house. Authorities said the gun was a .357 magnum service revolver believed owned by Hardin. But when deputies entered the house, they found that a gun case had been broken into and many other handguns and a number of rifles had been taken. It is believed Turner made his getaway from Fremont County using a 1972 yellow four-wheel-drive pickup truck stolen from Hardin's house. Officers said it is believed to be the truck Turner shot himself in. Thursday's manhunt narrowed when a ranch wife in Morgan County reported to sheriff's officers that a red-haired man driving a four-wheel drive pickup tried to drive across her property. The truck was spotted again north of Sterling, northeast of Ft. Morgan, where the elderly woman and two girls were taken hostage. Turner raped the 14-year-old in a barn, then left alone, officers said. A short while later, Morgan County Deputy Sheriff Leo Barker came upon the vehicle which had overheated and stalled about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest. A farmer, Burlie Segelke, had stopped minutes earlier and tried to get the vehicle started by pushing it. Barker said he ordered Segelke to approach him, then heard a shot inside the cab of the pickup truck. He found Turner dead of a head wound. Barker said he found the pistol, five rifles and a shotgun in the cab. Most of the weapons were cocked and ready to fire, he said. Apparently the weapons were those taken from the Hardin residence. A search airplane with Colorado Bureau of Investigation agents aboard landed in a nearby field just after Turner died. Turner was sentenced in Morgan County to a five-year-to-indefinite sentence at the state prison after pleading guilty to a charge of "gross sexual imposition." That plea was made to a reduced charge stemming from charges of rape and menacing in September 1974 after two teenaged girls from Grand Rapids, Mich., told officers he picked them up in his car near Brush and attacked them on a rural road south of Ft. Morgan. Records also show that in September 1975, while on furlough from the state prison, Turner was charged with assault and battery on a state patrolman at Ft. Morgan after the patrolman stopped his car for a traffic check. Turner was moved from the maximum security unit at the state prison to the Fremont County Jail last Nov. 20 after he witnessed the slaying of another inmate. Turner was released as a trustee to work bailing hay on Hardin's ranch house property. However, it is not known why jail officials did not discover Turner's absence Thursday night. Fremont County Undersheriff Don Cook said the county jail only had one other penitentiary inmate in its custody besides Turner, and that "it's been the practice in the past for these inmates to return to the jail after they have finished working for the day." He said, "I don't know what the arrangement the Sheriff (John Vernetti) made in Turner's case." Vernetti was not at the scene of the murders when reporters were present, and efforts to reach him Friday were unsuccessful. Cook said Vernetti spent much of the day trying to find Hardin's parents, who live in a remote area between Canon City and Westcliffe. The parents were found late in the afternoon. According to Jerry Agee, chief of the state corrections department, Turner was placed on trusty basis Thursday by the sheriff's office and was released to work on Hardin's ranch. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 1, 1976 - Friends Still Asking 'Why?' As Hardin Family is Buried - When Death strikes down the innocent and young, for every fragile form from which he lets the panting spirit free, a hundred virtues rise, in shapes of mercy, charity, and love, to walk the world, and bless it. - Charles Dickens. Rye - Perhaps the anger was still evident deep inside the mourners of the John E. Hardin family. If is was, it was shrouded by sadness for the five slain members. Still the faces of the large gathering expressed disbelief, shock and the tragic realization that their former neighbors and friends were being put to rest. The caskets of Mr. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard, his wife, Antoinette (Toni), 35 and their three children, Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James, 3, were lined up before the approximately 500 in attendance. The funeral services were held Tuesday at the Rye High School gymnasium, the town where Mr. Hardin grew up. Officiating were the Rev. Paul Leaming and Father Ronald Roche. Following the services, interment services were held at the Rye Cemetery. Survivors include Mr. Hardin's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin; two daughters by a previous marriage, Janda Sue and Bobbi Jean; two brothers, Frank and Jack Hardin and a sister, Susan Kiner. Mrs. Hardin is survived by her father, Esetuiel Baca; her mother Mrs. Celco Savala; two sons from a previous marriage, Larry and Troy Sanchez; four sisters, Mrs. Stella Castro, Gloria Alarid, Theresa Arudder, and Louise Whitcomb; four brothers, Richardo, Joseph, and Robert Baca and Tim Savala. The tragic events which led to Tuesday's funeral began to unfold last Friday when the family was found murdered in its Penrose home near Canon City. Richard Joseph Turner, who was working on furlough for the Hardins, as a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate, was the object of a state-wide search. He was found shot to death by his own hand, in a stolen pickup truck Friday afternoon near Fort Morgan as sheriff's officers closed in. The mourners paid their final respects to the Hardin family in the tiny town located southwest of Pueblo. Their faces still expressed the question, "Why?" Whatever the reason, or reasons, the killings prompted Gov. Richard Lamm to call a special session of the Colorado Legislature to work out a new plan to increase security at the state's penal institutions. But for the slain family, relatives and friends, it seemed of little consequence Monday. Following the services, the caskets were rolled out to the waiting hearses. As the mourners watched and comforted the family's survivors the bearers, the Fremont County Sheriff's Posse, first carried out the casket of Carol. Lori and her mother were next, then Jimmy and his father, whose casket was draped with the American flag. The tragedy had stunned the state and the funeral drew a few newspeople who, while realizing the touchy and sad situation, were not entirely welcome. A television cameraman, he related later, was approached by a member of the Hardin family and asked, "Why can't you (the news media) leave things be." A newspaper photographer was approached by another woman who asked him, "Do you care so much for your job that you have to do this?" The photographer explained that it wasn't his decision and the woman told him, "Tell your editor to go to hell." The tiny cemetery was soon crowded for the final service which concluded with the honor guard presenting the flag to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin - the final possession of their son's, but not the final memory. The large gathering soon departed leaving the Hardins, a family in life, still together as a family in death. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 2, 1976 - Undersheriff Wanted to Resign Prior to Hardin Murders, Sheriff Declares - Canon City - Fremont County Undersheriff Raymond D. "Don" Cooke resigned his post Tuesday stating among his reasons that, "It is my personal opinion that you (Sheriff John Vernetti) are solely to blame for this tragedy because you were aware of Richard Turner's attitude prior to the events of Aug. 27." At a press conference in Canon City Wednesday, Vernetti said Cooke had asked to resign on Aug. 24, four days before the family was killed. "Cooke mentioned that he wanted to resign prior to the Hardin incident. I was in the process of honoring his request," Vernetti said. Hardin, 37, his wife, Antoinette, 35, daughters, Lori, 15, Carol, 13, and son James, 3, were killed Friday by Colorado State Penitentiary inmate Richard J. Turner, who was working at the Hardin ranch on furlough from the Fremont County Sheriff's Department. Turner later killed himself near Fort Morgan as law enforcement officers closed in. In the letter, Cooke blamed Vernetti exclusively for the murders because he said the sheriff had known of Turner's "attitude" prior to the murder. Vernetti responded that he did not know what Cooke had intended by the word - "attitude." "I don't know what Mr. Cooke meant by that statement. While Mr. Turner was here, and before he met with the July parole board, I asked them to run a mental evaluation on him because I thought he had a problem with his temper," Vernetti said. The sheriff said he requested that a test be administered, and that he believed Turner was in the process of psychological evaluation by the West Central Mental Health Clinic in Canon City at the time he killed the Hardin family. Further questions regarding Turner's mental state would have to be referred to the clinic, Vernetti said, adding, "I'm not a psychologist." Vernetti said when Turner was transferred to the county jail for protective custody because he had witnessed a murder, he had asked the penitentiary for his status, and prison officials said Turner was on trusty status. He also quoted a prison investigator, John Snow, as saying, in effect, that co-operation with Turner would help in the case in which Turner was a witness. Snow, earlier in the week, told a reporter that Vernetti had asked for Turner as a trusty because he liked him. Vernetti said the terms of the agreement with the prison were that Turner could not be placed on any work details outside a fenced area without the supervision of a law enforcement officer. Turner was working for Hardin, who was a reserve prison guard as well as a rancher, at the time of the slayings. Vernetti said, however, that officers from his department should have checked on Turner the evening before the slayings when Turner failed to return from the Hardin ranch where he was on work release. He said Turner was due back at the county jail after supper, but a search was not launched for him until after the bodies of the Hardin family were found Friday morning. Asked if he was aware of any time that Turner had violated terms of his work release, authorized Feb. 19, Vernetti said he hadn't. But asked if he knew of an instance in which Turner failed to return to the jail on time while working on a construction project Feb. 27, Vernetti produced a report which showed that Turner was brought back to the jail late that night by deputies who searched for him. The report said Turner admitted to drinking four beers that night. Turner's trusty status prohibited his drinking of alcoholic beverages. Cooke also condemned Vernetti for his association with inmate James Chryslar. Chryslar, on trusty status at the Fremont County Jail, was sentenced in district court Wednesday for burglary, Vernetti said. Cooke's letter said: "Chryslar has taken part in a crime of violence and I feel he is not to be trusted. I personally was involved in an arrest on this man where he stated he would not be taken alive by officers. This man now has the run of the building." Vernetti said he could refute Cooke's charges regarding Chryslar "100 percent." He said the inmate had never participated in a crime of violence in Fremont County. "There is no record. If Mr. Cooke has a record of that he should return it to us because it belongs to the sheriff's department. Chryslar is on a trusty status here. He works only in the jail. He is not on work release or anything else," Vernetti said. Asked if he thought the murders indicated a need for a radical overhaul of policies at the penitentiary, Vernetti said, "I've never been in favor of radical changes. The governor is probably right in what he thinks needs to be done. And the citizens of Fremont County are partly right." The citizens of Canon City and the surrounding area, meanwhile, held a second public meeting Wednesday night with guards at the penitentiary for discussion of a petition drive demanding a grand jury investigation of "the governor's official conduct" with regard to administration of the prison. In addition to that request, the petition requests that the grand jury investigate and make recommendations concerning the following matters: The necessity of appointing a single warden for the prison with single final authority in the administration of the penitentiary; An investigation of the circumstances surrounding the recent release under the work release program of Turner; An investigation and recommendations regarding the conditions inside the penitentiary and the hazardous working conditions of personnel employed there. Ray Shoop, chairman of the petition drive, said guards who attended the meeting were supportive of the action. "The guards see the petition as a tool to get some things done that they've been wanting to get done." Shoop said that the subject of Vernetti's conduct with regard to Turner had not been raised. "This committee is not out head hunting. We just want to get some problems righted. The sheriff's office will be included in the investigation of the circumstances around the murders," he said. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - November 9, 1976 - Survivors of Massacred Family Ask $40 Million in Damages From State - Pueblo - Colorado Atty. Gen. J.D. MacFarlane has been asked to settle claims of $40 million in damages by survivors of the five members of the John Hardin family of Penrose, slain by a prison inmate in late August. Attorney Maurice R. Franks of Westcliffe and Pueblo made the settlement request in a letter required by Colorado law in such cases. The law requires persons seeking damage payments from the state to file a notice of intent within 90 days after the damage was done. Slain on Aug. 26 at their Penrose home were John Hardin, a Colorado State Penitentiary guard; his wife Antoinette; and three children, James Aubrey, 3, Carol, 12, and Laura, 15. The woman and two girls were raped and shot and the boy was beaten to death. The family was slain by Richard Turner, 23, a prison inmate on work release assigned to Hardin who police said killed himself as officers closed in. Turner was on a work release program from Fremont County Jail after being transferred from the medium security unit of the prison as a material witness to an inmate murder. A parole board rating filed last Jan. 8 by Board chairman Gordon Heggle said, "Richard Turner comes through in the interview as the classic rapist. There is no reason in the world to believe that he would not commit the third rape of his life and be arrested and convicted for the third time if he were released," the report said. Turner was sentenced to the prison from Morgan County after his conviction of two counts of gross sexual imposition. Franks said that he represents Inez A. Savala of Rye, the mother of Mrs. Hardin and grandmother of the three dead children; Ronnie Sanchez of Pueblo, father of the slain girls and guardian of two sons who are brothers of the two girls and half-brothers of the boy who was killed; and the two Sanchez boys, Larry and Troy. Franks has been trying to get information from the Colorado Bureau of investigation and from the attorney general to identify "who is responsible for Turner's being free to commit the rapes and the murders." However, Howard Gillespie, agent-in-charge of the CBI in Denver, said the CBI investigation was only of the crime scene and would in no way identify the persons whom the family is seeking. Further, he said, the reports are investigative and not open to the public. The lawyer said the alleged negligence of government officials gives rise to claims under Colorado negligence laws. But, he said, he also believes claims can be filed under the guarantees of equal protection under the law and of due process by the 5th and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The family is seeking $20 million in actual damages, and $20 million in punitive and exemplary damages. Franks said if the claims are not paid, lawsuits will be filed. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 23, 1977 - State Sued for $360 Million - Denver - Relatives and heirs of a five-member Penrose family, murdered last year by an escaped convict, have filed a $360 million damage suit against the state of Colorado and top corrections officials. The filing of the suit Monday in district court came almost one year after John E. Hardin, his wife and three children were found murdered last Aug. 26 in their blood-spattered home. Mrs. Hardin and one of her daughters had been raped. Named as defendants in the suit were the state of Colorado, Gerald Agee, former director of the Colorado Division of Correctional Services; Dr. Raymond Leidig, director of the Colorado Department of Institutions; members of the state penitentiary staff; the Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti, and several members of his staff. Richard Turner, the murderer, a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate who was being held in protective custody in Fremont County Jail, had been released to work in the home of Hardin, a prison guard. Turner fled the area to northeastern Colorado, where he shot and killed himself as law officers closed in near Brush. A grand jury investigating the tragedy last December issued strong reprimands to prison officials who had been involved in Turner's case. The damage suit, filed by Pueblo attorney Maurice Franks, also claims that Gov. Richard Lamm, and officials of the state penal system and the Colorado Bureau of Investigation were involved in a conspiracy in the incident.

Hardin, John Nathan
John Nathan Hardin - Pueblo Chieftain - May 08, 2005 - John Nathan Hardin passed away in Pueblo, Colo., on May 4, 2005. Born May 5, 1914, in Tiawah, Okla., to Samuel and Daisy Hardin, who preceded him in death. Also preceded by wife, Mary Mildred Hardin on Dec. 24, 2002; four sisters, two brothers, son-in-law, Gene (Sonny) Guerrero; daughter-in-law, Patricia Hardin; grandson, John Blunn; granddaughters, Kimberly Grabin, Shannon M. Guerrero and two great-granddaughters. John is survived by children, Samuel (Millie) Hardin, Jeannie (Bill) Grabin, Marilyn (Allan) Blunn, Marion Guerrero, Dianah Winton and Daniel Hardin; two brothers, Jim and Fred Hardin, 23 grandchildren, 50 great-grandchildren and nine great-great-grandchildren. The past 2 1/2 years John lived with his daughter Marilyn (Allan), and as his caregiver, he greatly enriched their lives. Daughters Marion and Dianah also assisted with his care. John retired from many years of construction work. He was an avid reader and enjoyed gardening, yard work, television and his grandchildren. He will be sadly missed. Our sincere thanks to Argus Home Health, Caregivers Julie, Yvonne, Randy, Marie, University Park Care Center Staff, Nurses, CNA's, and special thanks to all of John's children and grandchildren who assisted with his care. We deeply appreciate all their love and support. John will be cremated and inurned with the remains of his wife, Mildred, on Tuesday, May 31, 2005, 10 a.m.

Hardin, Lori
Lori Hardin - Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 28, 1976 - Escapee Kills Five; Takes His Own Life - A 23-year-old Colorado State Penitentiary inmate shot himself to death Friday afternoon after a rampage of murder and rape that resulted in the mass slaying of a five-member family in their three-bedroom ranch house a mile south of Penrose. Richard Joseph Turner, who killed all five members of the John E. Hardin family Thursday night, was found shot to death in a stolen pickup truck, Friday afternoon about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest, near Ft. Morgan, roughly 200 miles from the scene of Thursday's murders. Turner died of a gunshot wound from a .22-caliber pistol as sheriff's officers closed in on him after a manhunt that started about 10:30 a.m. Friday, shortly after the bodies of the Hardin family were discovered in their blood-spattered home. Turner, serving an indeterminate-to-five-year sentence for a 1975 Morgan County conviction of "gross sexual imposition," was a trusty at the Fremont County Jail. He was placed there last November for protective custody. Turner was on a work detail at the Hardin ranch at the time of the slayings. Gov. Richard Lamm has ordered an investigation into the circumstances that led to Turner being granted trusty status by Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti. The victims were identified as John E. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard who worked in the prison's minimum security section; his wife, Antoinette, or "Toni," 37; and their three children: Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James 2. Authorities said Mrs. Hardin and her two daughters were sexually molested, or raped. Officers said that while fleeing to Ft. Morgan, near his home, Turner took an elderly farm woman and two young girls hostage and raped one of the girls, who was 14 years old. The bodies of Hardin and his wife were found about 9:30 a.m. Friday when a telephone repairman, responding to a phone-off-the-hook service call, opened the garage door. When Fremont County Sheriff's deputies arrived, they found the infant's body in a front bedroom, and the bodies of the teenaged girls in separate bedrooms. Fremont County Coroner Henry Grabow said that late Friday it was known definitely that only one of the victims, one of the daughters, suffered a gunshot wound. He said the scene was so bloody and the wounds were so extensive, that it will take some time to determine if more bullet wounds were involved. He noted that one of the girls had a badly bruised arm, and though he ruled out possible use of a knife, Grabow said the assailant may have also used a weapon other than a gun - perhaps a "blunt" instrument, he said. Grabow said there was no evidence of a struggle. The Hardin children were found in night clothes and the parents were dressed in day clothes, he said. The females were found partially undressed. Grabow said that from his preliminary investigation, "I would guess that everybody was killed before they were (sexually) molested. At least it appears that way." Authorities have not determined the exact time of death, however there is reason to believe that some of the murders occurred about 10:30 p.m. Apparently Hardin and his wife left Turner with their children to go out for a while. The children were apparently killed in the meantime and when the parents returned, the parents were killed while parking their vehicle in the garage. Neighbors were quoted as saying that their dogs barked because of some disturbance about 10:30 p.m. No neighbors heard shots, however. Karl Hodgson, the Mountain Bell employe who first came upon the murder scene, said he first grew suspicious when he found a fun laying on the front yard of the ranch house. Authorities said the gun was a .357 magnum service revolver believed owned by Hardin. But when deputies entered the house, they found that a gun case had been broken into and many other handguns and a number of rifles had been taken. It is believed Turner made his getaway from Fremont County using a 1972 yellow four-wheel-drive pickup truck stolen from Hardin's house. Officers said it is believed to be the truck Turner shot himself in. Thursday's manhunt narrowed when a ranch wife in Morgan County reported to sheriff's officers that a red-haired man driving a four-wheel drive pickup tried to drive across her property. The truck was spotted again north of Sterling, northeast of Ft. Morgan, where the elderly woman and two girls were taken hostage. Turner raped the 14-year-old in a barn, then left alone, officers said. A short while later, Morgan County Deputy Sheriff Leo Barker came upon the vehicle which had overheated and stalled about seven miles northeast of Hillcrest. A farmer, Burlie Segelke, had stopped minutes earlier and tried to get the vehicle started by pushing it. Barker said he ordered Segelke to approach him, then heard a shot inside the cab of the pickup truck. He found Turner dead of a head wound. Barker said he found the pistol, five rifles and a shotgun in the cab. Most of the weapons were cocked and ready to fire, he said. Apparently the weapons were those taken from the Hardin residence. A search airplane with Colorado Bureau of Investigation agents aboard landed in a nearby field just after Turner died. Turner was sentenced in Morgan County to a five-year-to-indefinite sentence at the state prison after pleading guilty to a charge of "gross sexual imposition." That plea was made to a reduced charge stemming from charges of rape and menacing in September 1974 after two teenaged girls from Grand Rapids, Mich., told officers he picked them up in his car near Brush and attacked them on a rural road south of Ft. Morgan. Records also show that in September 1975, while on furlough from the state prison, Turner was charged with assault and battery on a state patrolman at Ft. Morgan after the patrolman stopped his car for a traffic check. Turner was moved from the maximum security unit at the state prison to the Fremont County Jail last Nov. 20 after he witnessed the slaying of another inmate. Turner was released as a trustee to work bailing hay on Hardin's ranch house property. However, it is not known why jail officials did not discover Turner's absence Thursday night. Fremont County Undersheriff Don Cook said the county jail only had one other penitentiary inmate in its custody besides Turner, and that "it's been the practice in the past for these inmates to return to the jail after they have finished working for the day." He said, "I don't know what the arrangement the Sheriff (John Vernetti) made in Turner's case." Vernetti was not at the scene of the murders when reporters were present, and efforts to reach him Friday were unsuccessful. Cook said Vernetti spent much of the day trying to find Hardin's parents, who live in a remote area between Canon City and Westcliffe. The parents were found late in the afternoon. According to Jerry Agee, chief of the state corrections department, Turner was placed on trusty basis Thursday by the sheriff's office and was released to work on Hardin's ranch. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 1, 1976 - Friends Still Asking 'Why?' As Hardin Family is Buried - When Death strikes down the innocent and young, for every fragile form from which he lets the panting spirit free, a hundred virtues rise, in shapes of mercy, charity, and love, to walk the world, and bless it. - Charles Dickens. Rye - Perhaps the anger was still evident deep inside the mourners of the John E. Hardin family. If is was, it was shrouded by sadness for the five slain members. Still the faces of the large gathering expressed disbelief, shock and the tragic realization that their former neighbors and friends were being put to rest. The caskets of Mr. Hardin, 37, a reserve penitentiary guard, his wife, Antoinette (Toni), 35 and their three children, Lori, 15; Carol, 13; and James, 3, were lined up before the approximately 500 in attendance. The funeral services were held Tuesday at the Rye High School gymnasium, the town where Mr. Hardin grew up. Officiating were the Rev. Paul Leaming and Father Ronald Roche. Following the services, interment services were held at the Rye Cemetery. Survivors include Mr. Hardin's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin; two daughters by a previous marriage, Janda Sue and Bobbi Jean; two brothers, Frank and Jack Hardin and a sister, Susan Kiner. Mrs. Hardin is survived by her father, Esetuiel Baca; her mother Mrs. Celco Savala; two sons from a previous marriage, Larry and Troy Sanchez; four sisters, Mrs. Stella Castro, Gloria Alarid, Theresa Arudder, and Louise Whitcomb; four brothers, Richardo, Joseph, and Robert Baca and Tim Savala. The tragic events which led to Tuesday's funeral began to unfold last Friday when the family was found murdered in its Penrose home near Canon City. Richard Joseph Turner, who was working on furlough for the Hardins, as a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate, was the object of a state-wide search. He was found shot to death by his own hand, in a stolen pickup truck Friday afternoon near Fort Morgan as sheriff's officers closed in. The mourners paid their final respects to the Hardin family in the tiny town located southwest of Pueblo. Their faces still expressed the question, "Why?" Whatever the reason, or reasons, the killings prompted Gov. Richard Lamm to call a special session of the Colorado Legislature to work out a new plan to increase security at the state's penal institutions. But for the slain family, relatives and friends, it seemed of little consequence Monday. Following the services, the caskets were rolled out to the waiting hearses. As the mourners watched and comforted the family's survivors the bearers, the Fremont County Sheriff's Posse, first carried out the casket of Carol. Lori and her mother were next, then Jimmy and his father, whose casket was draped with the American flag. The tragedy had stunned the state and the funeral drew a few newspeople who, while realizing the touchy and sad situation, were not entirely welcome. A television cameraman, he related later, was approached by a member of the Hardin family and asked, "Why can't you (the news media) leave things be." A newspaper photographer was approached by another woman who asked him, "Do you care so much for your job that you have to do this?" The photographer explained that it wasn't his decision and the woman told him, "Tell your editor to go to hell." The tiny cemetery was soon crowded for the final service which concluded with the honor guard presenting the flag to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hardin - the final possession of their son's, but not the final memory. The large gathering soon departed leaving the Hardins, a family in life, still together as a family in death. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - September 2, 1976 - Undersheriff Wanted to Resign Prior to Hardin Murders, Sheriff Declares - Canon City - Fremont County Undersheriff Raymond D. "Don" Cooke resigned his post Tuesday stating among his reasons that, "It is my personal opinion that you (Sheriff John Vernetti) are solely to blame for this tragedy because you were aware of Richard Turner's attitude prior to the events of Aug. 27." At a press conference in Canon City Wednesday, Vernetti said Cooke had asked to resign on Aug. 24, four days before the family was killed. "Cooke mentioned that he wanted to resign prior to the Hardin incident. I was in the process of honoring his request," Vernetti said. Hardin, 37, his wife, Antoinette, 35, daughters, Lori, 15, Carol, 13, and son James, 3, were killed Friday by Colorado State Penitentiary inmate Richard J. Turner, who was working at the Hardin ranch on furlough from the Fremont County Sheriff's Department. Turner later killed himself near Fort Morgan as law enforcement officers closed in. In the letter, Cooke blamed Vernetti exclusively for the murders because he said the sheriff had known of Turner's "attitude" prior to the murder. Vernetti responded that he did not know what Cooke had intended by the word - "attitude." "I don't know what Mr. Cooke meant by that statement. While Mr. Turner was here, and before he met with the July parole board, I asked them to run a mental evaluation on him because I thought he had a problem with his temper," Vernetti said. The sheriff said he requested that a test be administered, and that he believed Turner was in the process of psychological evaluation by the West Central Mental Health Clinic in Canon City at the time he killed the Hardin family. Further questions regarding Turner's mental state would have to be referred to the clinic, Vernetti said, adding, "I'm not a psychologist." Vernetti said when Turner was transferred to the county jail for protective custody because he had witnessed a murder, he had asked the penitentiary for his status, and prison officials said Turner was on trusty status. He also quoted a prison investigator, John Snow, as saying, in effect, that co-operation with Turner would help in the case in which Turner was a witness. Snow, earlier in the week, told a reporter that Vernetti had asked for Turner as a trusty because he liked him. Vernetti said the terms of the agreement with the prison were that Turner could not be placed on any work details outside a fenced area without the supervision of a law enforcement officer. Turner was working for Hardin, who was a reserve prison guard as well as a rancher, at the time of the slayings. Vernetti said, however, that officers from his department should have checked on Turner the evening before the slayings when Turner failed to return from the Hardin ranch where he was on work release. He said Turner was due back at the county jail after supper, but a search was not launched for him until after the bodies of the Hardin family were found Friday morning. Asked if he was aware of any time that Turner had violated terms of his work release, authorized Feb. 19, Vernetti said he hadn't. But asked if he knew of an instance in which Turner failed to return to the jail on time while working on a construction project Feb. 27, Vernetti produced a report which showed that Turner was brought back to the jail late that night by deputies who searched for him. The report said Turner admitted to drinking four beers that night. Turner's trusty status prohibited his drinking of alcoholic beverages. Cooke also condemned Vernetti for his association with inmate James Chryslar. Chryslar, on trusty status at the Fremont County Jail, was sentenced in district court Wednesday for burglary, Vernetti said. Cooke's letter said: "Chryslar has taken part in a crime of violence and I feel he is not to be trusted. I personally was involved in an arrest on this man where he stated he would not be taken alive by officers. This man now has the run of the building." Vernetti said he could refute Cooke's charges regarding Chryslar "100 percent." He said the inmate had never participated in a crime of violence in Fremont County. "There is no record. If Mr. Cooke has a record of that he should return it to us because it belongs to the sheriff's department. Chryslar is on a trusty status here. He works only in the jail. He is not on work release or anything else," Vernetti said. Asked if he thought the murders indicated a need for a radical overhaul of policies at the penitentiary, Vernetti said, "I've never been in favor of radical changes. The governor is probably right in what he thinks needs to be done. And the citizens of Fremont County are partly right." The citizens of Canon City and the surrounding area, meanwhile, held a second public meeting Wednesday night with guards at the penitentiary for discussion of a petition drive demanding a grand jury investigation of "the governor's official conduct" with regard to administration of the prison. In addition to that request, the petition requests that the grand jury investigate and make recommendations concerning the following matters: The necessity of appointing a single warden for the prison with single final authority in the administration of the penitentiary; An investigation of the circumstances surrounding the recent release under the work release program of Turner; An investigation and recommendations regarding the conditions inside the penitentiary and the hazardous working conditions of personnel employed there. Ray Shoop, chairman of the petition drive, said guards who attended the meeting were supportive of the action. "The guards see the petition as a tool to get some things done that they've been wanting to get done." Shoop said that the subject of Vernetti's conduct with regard to Turner had not been raised. "This committee is not out head hunting. We just want to get some problems righted. The sheriff's office will be included in the investigation of the circumstances around the murders," he said. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - November 9, 1976 - Survivors of Massacred Family Ask $40 Million in Damages From State - Pueblo - Colorado Atty. Gen. J.D. MacFarlane has been asked to settle claims of $40 million in damages by survivors of the five members of the John Hardin family of Penrose, slain by a prison inmate in late August. Attorney Maurice R. Franks of Westcliffe and Pueblo made the settlement request in a letter required by Colorado law in such cases. The law requires persons seeking damage payments from the state to file a notice of intent within 90 days after the damage was done. Slain on Aug. 26 at their Penrose home were John Hardin, a Colorado State Penitentiary guard; his wife Antoinette; and three children, James Aubrey, 3, Carol, 12, and Laura, 15. The woman and two girls were raped and shot and the boy was beaten to death. The family was slain by Richard Turner, 23, a prison inmate on work release assigned to Hardin who police said killed himself as officers closed in. Turner was on a work release program from Fremont County Jail after being transferred from the medium security unit of the prison as a material witness to an inmate murder. A parole board rating filed last Jan. 8 by Board chairman Gordon Heggle said, "Richard Turner comes through in the interview as the classic rapist. There is no reason in the world to believe that he would not commit the third rape of his life and be arrested and convicted for the third time if he were released," the report said. Turner was sentenced to the prison from Morgan County after his conviction of two counts of gross sexual imposition. Franks said that he represents Inez A. Savala of Rye, the mother of Mrs. Hardin and grandmother of the three dead children; Ronnie Sanchez of Pueblo, father of the slain girls and guardian of two sons who are brothers of the two girls and half-brothers of the boy who was killed; and the two Sanchez boys, Larry and Troy. Franks has been trying to get information from the Colorado Bureau of investigation and from the attorney general to identify "who is responsible for Turner's being free to commit the rapes and the murders." However, Howard Gillespie, agent-in-charge of the CBI in Denver, said the CBI investigation was only of the crime scene and would in no way identify the persons whom the family is seeking. Further, he said, the reports are investigative and not open to the public. The lawyer said the alleged negligence of government officials gives rise to claims under Colorado negligence laws. But, he said, he also believes claims can be filed under the guarantees of equal protection under the law and of due process by the 5th and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The family is seeking $20 million in actual damages, and $20 million in punitive and exemplary damages. Franks said if the claims are not paid, lawsuits will be filed. Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph - August 23, 1977 - State Sued for $360 Million - Denver - Relatives and heirs of a five-member Penrose family, murdered last year by an escaped convict, have filed a $360 million damage suit against the state of Colorado and top corrections officials. The filing of the suit Monday in district court came almost one year after John E. Hardin, his wife and three children were found murdered last Aug. 26 in their blood-spattered home. Mrs. Hardin and one of her daughters had been raped. Named as defendants in the suit were the state of Colorado, Gerald Agee, former director of the Colorado Division of Correctional Services; Dr. Raymond Leidig, director of the Colorado Department of Institutions; members of the state penitentiary staff; the Fremont County Sheriff John Vernetti, and several members of his staff. Richard Turner, the murderer, a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate who was being held in protective custody in Fremont County Jail, had been released to work in the home of Hardin, a prison guard. Turner fled the area to northeastern Colorado, where he shot and killed himself as law officers closed in near Brush. A grand jury investigating the tragedy last December issued strong reprimands to prison officials who had been involved in Turner's case. The damage suit, filed by Pueblo attorney Maurice Franks, also claims that Gov. Richard Lamm, and officials of the state penal system and the Colorado Bureau of Investigation were involved in a conspiracy in the incident.

Hardin, Mary Mildred
Mary Mildred Hardin - Pueblo Chieftain - December 27, 2002 - Mary Mildred Hardin, 82, passed over Dec. 24, 2002, in Pueblo, Colo. Born Feb. 6, 1920, in Higgins, Texas, to Clarence and Mary Glassey who preceded her along with one brother; three sisters; two granddaughters; two great-granddaughters; and special son-in-law, Sonny Guerrero. Survived by her loving husband of 64 years, John N. Hardin; children, Sam (Milly) Hardin, Jean (Bill) Grabin, Marilyn, (Allan) Blunn, Marion Guerrero, Dianah Winton, Dan (Pat) Hardin; 24 grandchildren, 48 great-grandchildren, and seven great-great-grandchildren. Mary was a very caring and dedicated wife, mother, and grandmother who enjoyed her family immensely. She enjoyed baking, vegetable and flower gardening, canning, knitting, sewing, crocheting, quilting, and the special time she spent nursing. She will be greatly missed by all her family. A special thanks to Dr. Kunstle., Dr. Sumpter, and Dr. Manning. Also to Argus Home Health Care, and the nurses for their extra care and comfort to our mother and to all her primary caregivers. Per her request, inurnment at a later date.

Hardin, Richard Family of
Richard Hardin - Pueblo Chieftain - August 28, 1976 - Did tavern hassle lead to murders? - Penrose (C-SJ) An incident in a Penrose bar late Thursday may have been the launching point for a spree of rape and murder by a Colorado State Penitentiary inmate in which he and a five member Penrose family were killed. Richard Turner, 24, a CSP inmate, murdered Richard Hardin, his wife, Toni and their three children sometime between late Thursday and early Friday. Turner later shot himself when police closed in on him near Fort Morgan. According to witnesses at the scene, Hardin and Turner had been drinking together Thursday night. Local authorities would not confirm this Friday afternoon. However in a check by The Pueblo Chieftain, one Penrose tavern owner said Turner and Hardin did spend nearly four hours in his establishment Thursday evening. John Miller, owner of Gab's Café, said Hardin and Turner had a little hassle before they left his tavern. Miller said the two had been drinking during the time they spent in the bar but he couldn't say whether either one or both of the men were drunk.

Hardin, Victor K.
Victor K. Hardin – Los Angeles Times - August 8, 2002 – Victor K. Hardin was born Sept. 25, 1917 in Plains, CO. He died August 4, 2002. He moved to CA during the Depression traveling with a friend in a Model T. Ford to avoid the dust bowl. He began working for Lumley Motors in Huntington Park as a porter. He worked his way up to become General Manager of the Lumley dealerships in Los Angeles and Huntington Park. World War II broke out and Victor joined the service. He rose to the rank of Captain in the Air Force where he served in the Pacific Theatre and after the war, in the occupation forces in Japan. In 1947, he became partners with Jack Taylor in an Oldsmobile/Nash dealership in South Gate. In 1957, he acquired his own Oldsmobile dealership in Anaheim. The first facility was a converted gas station on North Los Angeles Street (Anaheim Boulevard) with a one-car showroom, employing twelve people. In 1963, the dealership was moved to a more modern facility at 1300 S. Anaheim Boulevard. In 1970, Victor became one of the first Honda automobile dealers. Honda was an upstart automobile company at the time with a compact car that was not very popular and most dealers turned down the opportunity to sell Honda. In 1973, Victor was joined by his son, Dennis in the business and the two quickly became partners and continued that partnership until Victor's passing. Hondas quickly gained in popularity with the introduction of the Civic in 1973. In 1991, the Honda dealership expanded to the point where it became necessary to build a separate facility in the Anaheim Auto Center. Also in 1991, the GMC Truck franchise was acquired. In 2000, the Buick and Pontiac franchises were purchased, Oldsmobile was terminated and the three remaining GM franchises were also moved to the Anaheim Auto Center. Today, forty-five years later, the company employs 220 employees between the two dealerships. Victor was the first president of the Orange County Automobile Dealers Association and served on many dealer councils and other industry-wide dealer leadership positions. He also served throughout the community in many charitable causes including the Optimists Club, as president, a member of the Free Masons, CHOC, YMCA, OC Performing Arts Center and many other charities. Vic was a great lover of the outdoors. He enjoyed golf, hunting and fishing trips around the world. He enjoyed socializing with his many friends and was well liked by all. The Orange County Register named him Sexiest Man in Orange County in 1995. Vic was a long time resident of both Dana Point and Indian Wells. He is survived by his wife, Karen of Dana Point, his brother George “Dobber” of Denver, CO, his son Dennis of Anaheim, daughter Victoria Woods of Salem OR, six grandchildren, Travis, Roberta, Sanya, Jared, Aubrey and Eric, and four great-grand daughters. Seven family members are continuing his legacy in the family business. Even in his last days, working in the family business brought him great pleasure. Services will be held today, Thurs. Aug. 8th at Fairhaven Memorial Park in Santa Ana at 11 a.m.

Harding, Irene A.
Irene A. Harding - Pueblo Chieftain - September 20, 2003 - Irene A. Harding , born May 2, 1919, died Sept. 19, 2003. Survived by sisters, Betty C. Davis and Billie Sue Verhoeff and families. By her wishes, Direct Cremation, no services.

Harding, Kathleen
Kathleen Harding - Huerfano World – February 23, 2006 – Going home Lord, when my soul takes flight, may it rise swiftly to live forever in your love and care. Kathleen had a loving and generous nature and was a devoted family woman and good friend to many. She always will be remembered. Kathleen Barbara Harding, 83, born March 31, 1922, St. Mary Corwin Hospital in Pueblo, died peacefully at home Wednesday, February 15. Preceded in death by her parents, Melvin and Ada (Christianson) Utt, two sisters, one brother and her husband, Robert Andreoli. She is survived by her husband John Harding, sister, Doris Tommey, Roy, UT, son Donald Andreoli, two grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and two step-daughters, one step-son, numerous nieces and nephews. She married Robert Andreoli on April 10, 1948, married John Wesely Harding on October 5, 1986. Mrs. Harding was a school teacher for years and was a gourmet cook who collected cook books, dolls and rosaries. She was a long-time member of the Territorial Daughters. Mrs. Harding was the coordinator for the Huerfano County Board for the Developmentally Disabled for 20 years. She was very devoted to these children and did everything she could to help them. She received a Commendation from Gov. Roy Romer for her efforts and was Who's Who as a result of her pioneering achievements. Funeral Mass will be at 10:30 a.m., Friday, February 24, at the Christ the King Church in La Veta, corner of Main and Virginia, with burial at the La Veta Cemetery.

Hardman, Mary H.
Mary H. Hardman - Pueblo Chieftain - June 26, 2002 - Mary H. Hardman, 89, was received into the loving arms of the Lord on Saturday, June 22, 2002. She was preceded in death by her twin sister, Grace Darling Murray; parents, John Murray and Grace Murray; loving husband, Ora Hardman; and sister-in-law, Vergie Hardman. Mary is survived by her two daughters, Evelyn (Jerry) Goddard and Carolyn E. Oates; grandchildren, Michelle (Tim) Zeitlow, Michael (Cathi) Goddard, Nicholas W. Oates, Katie H. Oates; great-grandchildren, Zachary, T.J. and Zara; and special friends, Gerald Pagel, Bill Genovese, Avice Goddard, Justin Fox, Alex Monson, Danny Fuller and Gloria Read. Mary was a devout Christian, and loved spending time with her family. She loved to sew, crochet and do needlework, which she always shared with her family. The family will receive their friends at Adrian Comer Garden Chapel from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 26, 2002. Funeral services will be 10 a.m. Thursday, June 27, 2002, at Adrian Comer Garden Chapel. Interment will follow at 3:30 p.m. at Belleview Cemetery, 3455 W. 83rd Ave., Westminster, Colo.

Hardrick, Judith Elaine
Judith Elaine Hardrick - Pueblo Chieftain - April 28, 2005 - Judith Elaine Hardrick, 49, went to be with the Lord unexpectedly on April 26, 2005. Born on June 22, 1955. She is survived by her mother, Mona Relph; and father, Daniel Hardrick; stepmother, Audrey Hardrick; sister, Virginia (Carl) Johnson; and brother, Danny Hardrick of Pueblo; nephews, Kevin (Wendy) Johnson of Surprise, Ariz., Joey (Leah) Johnson of Corona, Calif., Bradley (Mindy) Johnson of Decatur, Ill., and Brandon (Paula) Johnson of Phoenix, Ariz.; niece, Bailey Johnson, Surprise, Ariz. Judy enjoyed her many friends and special friend of many years, Mark Carter. She attended First Church of the Nazarene. Visitation will be held 4 to 8 p.m. today, April 28, 2005, at Roselawn Funeral Home. Graveside service will be held 10 a.m. Friday, April 29, 2005, at the Roselawn Cemetery.

Hardway, Margaret A.
Margaret A. Hardway - Pueblo Chieftain - March 07, 1999 - Margaret A. Hardway, 90, lifetime resident of Pueblo, passed away March 4,1999. Preceded in death by husband, William J. Hardway- and parents, Ennis and Nora Rinker. Also preceded in death by her brother- two sisters- grandson and great-granddaughter. Survived by children, Norene (William) Piquette, JuliaAnn (Robert) Walters, Charles (Cathy) Hardway, Helen (Joseph) Fox and James (Mary) Hardway. Also survived by 14 grandchildren- 10 great-grandchildren- and numerous nieces and nephews. Margaret retired from the general finance department at the Colorado State Hospital, September 1974. She was a member of the Cathedral of Sacred Heart, the Cathedral Altar Society and the Rosary Club. Public visitation, 1-3 p.m. Monday, March 8, 1999, at the funeral home. Funeral Mass, 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 9, 1999, Cathedral of the Sacred Heart. Interment, Roselawn Cemetery. The family respectfully requests that donations may be made to the Cathedral Renovation Fund, 414 W. 11th St., Pueblo, Colo., 81003, in memory of Margaret A. Hardway.

Hardwick, Robert D.
Robert D. Hardwick - Pueblo Chieftain - July 31, 1997 - Robert D. Hardwick, a lifelong Pueblo resident, passed away July 30, 1997, in Pueblo. He was 81. Bob is survived by a brother, Dwayne (Alice) Hardwick of Denver- a sister, Mable Gilmore of Oregon- and numerous nieces and nephews. Graveside services will be held on Friday, Aug. 1, 1997, in Block 11 of the Mountain View Cemetery.

Hardy, Annie E.
Annie E. Hardy - Rocky Mountain News – November 14, 1911 - Annie E. Hardy - Funeral Notice - from the residence of her daughter, 3440 West Thirty-fifth Avenue, Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends invited, interment at Fairmount, Pueblo papers please copy. Rocky Mountain News – November 14, 1911 - Burial Permit – Annie E. Hardy, age 60, 3421 Moncrief Place.

Hardy, Emma Jean
Emma Jean Hardy - Pueblo Chieftain - December 28, 1999 - Emma Jean Hardy, longtime resident of Pueblo. Born on Aug. 10, 1923, in Gillette, Wyo., to Jack Roller and Druacilla Moffitt, (both deceased). Married Roy S. Hardy (deceased). Retired bookkeeper from LeMasters Janitorial Supply of Pueblo. Past president of United Methodist Church Women's Church Guild of Pueblo. Survived by daughters, Patsey Joe Shubert of Pueblo, Judy Lynn Ditmore, Colorado Springs; son, Vern Russell Hardy of Pueblo; brother, Earl Roller of Wright, Wyo.; five grandchildren; one great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by brothers, Dick and John Roller. There will be a reception after the service at daughter, Judy Ditmore's home in Colorado Springs. Colorado Springs Gazette - December 28, 1999 - Emma Jean Hardy, 76, died Dec. 25, 1999, at a local hospital. She was a bookkeeper for LeMasters Janitorial Supply Co. in Pueblo. Mrs. Hardy was born Aug. 10, 1923, in Gillette, Wyo. She was married to Roy S. Hardy, who is deceased. She is survived by a son, Vern Russell; two daughters, Patsy Sue Shubert and Judy Lynn Ditmore; a brother, Earl Boller; five grandchildren; and a great-grandchild. A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Blunt Mortuary Chapel, 2229 W. Colorado Ave., 634-8831. Inurnment will be private.

Hardy, Gertie Marie
Gertie Marie Hardy - Pueblo Chieftain - July 08, 2000 - Gertie Marie Hardy, 69, went to be with the Lord on July 5, 2000, in Pueblo, Colo. Born Aug. 14, 1930, in Mount Vernon, Ill. Survived by her loving husband of 51 years, Paul "Leonard" Hardy of the family home; children, Robert (Ruth) Hardy, Kenny (Deanna) Hardy, Karen (Mark) Mauger, and Barbara (David) Martin; 15 grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and sister, Doris Mitchell. Preceded in death by son, James Hardy; parents, Robert Leslie Roberson and Carrie Warner; stepfather, Delbert Warner; brother, Les Roberson; and sister, Inis Riley. She was a loving wife, mother, and grandmother. Her family was the most important thing to her and she to them. She was also a very avid Bronco fan. Visitation, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Funeral service, 2 p.m. Monday, Imperial Funeral Home Chapel. Interment, Imperial Memorial Gardens.

Hardy, Paul
Paul Hardy - Pueblo Chieftain - March 18, 2004 - Paul Hardy, 73, went to be with his heavenly Father on March 15, 2004, in Pueblo, Colo. Born on May 5, 1930, in Two Buttes, Colo., to Reuben and Martha Hardy who preceded him; along with his loving wife, Gertie; son, James Hardy; brothers, Floyd and Walter; and sisters, Alta, Ruby and Alma. He will be greatly missed by his children, Robert (Ruth) Hardy, Karen (Mark) Mauger, Kenny (Deanna) Hardy, Barbara (David) Martin; grandchildren, Bobby (Marcella), Paul (Hannah), David (Dawn), Calvin, Kyle, Kindra (Brad), Brian, Danny, Curtis (Allison), Brenda, LaDonna and Jacob; great-grandchildren, Brandon, Shelby, Brianna, Cheyanne and Ethan; brother, Everett (Ethel) Hardy; and sister, Carol Cortner. The most important thing in Paul's life was his relationship with his Lord and Savior. Paul knew that if God was first in his life, then everything else would fall into place. He shared 51 years with the love of his life, Gertie, whom he now joins in heaven. His children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren were the light of his life. Paul loved being surrounded by his family. He was the foundation and corner stone for his family. Paul's legacy will live on in all those who knew and loved him. Funeral service, 2 p.m. Saturday, Imperial Funeral Home Chapel. Interment, Imperial Memorial Gardens. There will be a reception immediately following the interment at Fellowship of the Rockies, 3892 W. Northern Ave., Pueblo.

Hardy, Richard T.
Richard T. "Dick" Hardy - Pueblo Chieftain - August 15, 2003 - Richard T. "Dick" Hardy passed away Aug. 14, 2003, in Pueblo. Richard was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on Feb. 15, 1922, and lived in Pueblo since 1978. He was a member of Newburgh Lodge No. 379 F. & A.M. and Pueblo Eagles Aerie No. 145, and was a Navy veteran, having served during WWII and the Korean War. Mr. Hardy was preceded in death in 1988 by his wife, Mary Jane. He is survived by his son, Rick Hardy of Pueblo; and daughter, Constance Darlene (John) Blust of Twinsburg, Ohio; and six grandchildren. Visitation, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. The family will be present from 3 to 5 p.m. both days. Service, 10 a.m. Monday, Imperial Funeral Home Chapel.

Hare, Eva
Eva Hare - Pueblo Chieftain - August 8, 1943 - Eva Hare, at local hospital; survived by a daughter, Mrs. Noble McKinney of Montezuma, Colo. Remains will be taken to Colorado Springs Monday afternoon for services and interment, Evergreen cemetery.

Harford, Gordon
Gordon “Sonny” Harford - Pueblo Chieftain - February 25, 2002 - Age 55 years of age, born Oct. 21, 1946, in Pueblo, Colo. Passed away Feb. 23, 2002, in Pueblo, Colo. Survived by his wife, Janet Lorene Harford; daughter, Kelly (Kirk) Guddendorf; sons, Tyler Harford and Tayler Harford; grandchildren, Megan Guddendorf and Hunter Guddendorf; brothers, James Harford and Robert (Roxie) Harford; sisters, Brucine (Bud) Rice and Erma Albanese; mother-in-law, Evelyn Bradford; brothers-in-law, Ron (Barb) Bradford, Jim (Diane) Bradford; sisters-in-law, Sue (Tom) McAvoy, and Cheryl (Phil) Stephan. Also survived by numerous nephews, nieces and other close relatives. Preceded in death by parents, Albert B. Harford and Helen J. Harford; and grandson, Dylan Guddendorf; father-in-law', Donald Bradford and niece, Ashley Albanese. Gordon graduated from South High in 1964 and attended USC for 4 years and received a degree in civil engineering. Gordon was employed by Rice & Rice Inc. for the past 20 years as a foreman. Gordon loved to watch the Broncos and the Avalanche. He also enjoyed hunting, fishing and being outdoors. He also loved spending time with his family and was a wonderful father and husband. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Harford Children's Fund through the funeral home. Viewing, 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. Tuesday. Funeral service, 10 a.m. Wednesday at Imperial Memorial Gardens.

Hargis, Anna Marie
Anna Marie Hargis - Pueblo Chieftain - July 3, 1987 - Anna Marie Hargis, 74, of Pueblo, died Monday, June 1987, at home of natural causes. Anna, a retired switchboard operator for CF&I Steel Corp., was born May 17, 1913, in Pueblo, a daughter of John and Katherine Mutz. She married John Virgil Hargis, on Nov. 21, 1938. She held various jobs during her life, working at the old St. Mary's Hospital, the Pueblo Army Depot and CF&I, from which she retired after 26 years. She was a former member of a rural Home Demonstration Club. A God-given talent enabled her to express her love of arts and crafts. Her favorite activity was China painting. Survivors Include a daughter, Mary Ray (Mrs. Richard) Yocum of Boise, Idaho; three sisters, Mary (Mrs. Ed) McCaughey, Woodland Park, Catherine (Mrs. Frank) Pavol and Helen (Mrs. Virgil) Jacobs, both of Pueblo; five grandchildren, Michelle, Scott and Jeff Peterson and Jessica and Matthew Yocum, all of Boise; several cousins and friends. She was preceded in death by her husband, father, sister and her mother, Mrs. Katherine Ercul. Funeral services will be held 11 a.m. Thursday, July 2, 1987, at George McCarthy Historic Chapel. Burial will follow at Roselawn Cemetery.

Hargraves, Mary H.
Mary H. Hargraves - Pueblo Chieftain - May 17, 2006 - Mary H. Hargraves, 92, has rejoined her family in Heaven, passing from this Earth on May 13, 2006. Mary was born Nov. 15, 1913, in Pueblo. Preceded in death by her parents, Anton Vidmar and Kathrine Culig; husband, Chester; her son; four brothers and one sister. She is survived by her daughter, Cathy (Greg) Hahn; sisters, Elsie (the late Leroy) Rebol and Katie (Porter) Talley; granddaughters, Stacy and Janelle; and niece, Sharon (James) Pighetti. Funeral service, 10:30 a.m. Friday, King of Kings Lutheran Church, 2561 Vinewood Lane, with Pastor Mark Crates officiating. Reception following in Fellowship Hall. Interment, Roselawn Cemetery. A special thanks to the wonderful staff at the Belmont Lodge for taking such loving care of Mary for the past six years.

Hargraves, Roger A.
Roger A. Hargraves - Pueblo Chieftain - May 31, 2004 - Roger A. Hargraves, 63, passed away May 29, 2004. Survived by loving wife, Diana; daughter, Kari (Brian) Harper; son, Ken Hargraves; granddaughter, Shyane; grandson, Bryson; sisters, Beverly Percival and Shirley (Jim) Stanfield; numerous nieces and nephews. Roger graduated from Central High School in 1959. He was a natural athlete that seemed to do well in anything he tried from football to golfing, to bowling and tennis, to softball and baseball. He was the life of the party and always had some story to tell. Memorial service, 10 a.m. Wednesday, at Imperial Memorial Chapel.

Hargrove, H. Price
H. Price Hargrove - Pueblo Chieftain - September 24, 1999 - H. Price Hargrove, 76, of Littleton, formerly of Pueblo, passed away Sept. 22, 1999, at Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital in Denver. Born May 30, 1923, in Hoehne, Colo. He attended Colorado State University, majoring in agricultural sciences. Price married Audrey Elizabeth (Bryant) on Oct. 21, 1972, in Glenwood Springs. He was employed as a highway construction superintendent and was a member of the Elks Club (Glenwood Springs and Littleton) and Mended Hearts. Price loved flying, trips to Las Vegas and Blackhawk and his work. He completed many highway projects across the state of Colorado, including I-25, C-470 and Pena Boulevard. Survived by his wife, Audrey; brother, Houston E. (Lillian) Hargrove of Loveland; sisters, Evelyn H. Gresham of Montrose and Aileen H. (Joseph J.) Pascoe of Denver; as well as nieces, nephews and many friends. Cremation. Funeral service, 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 25, 1999, at Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton, Colo., 80120. Contributions may be made to the church in Price's memory.

Hargrove, Josephine
Josephine Smith Hargrove - Huerfano World - October 31, 1991 - Josephine Smith Hargrove of Denver, formerly of Walsenburg died Oct. 22, 1991 in St. Anthony's Hospital in Denver. Born July 29, 1909 in Fulda, MN, one of nine children, Mrs. Hargrove was employed by the Huerfano County School District for 26 years. She taught in Pryor from 1931-1936 and at Hill and Washington Schools from 1953 until her retirement in 1974. She also taught in Pagosa Springs and Granby. She is survived by her son Douglas, Denver; daughter Beverly Kinahan, Aurora; two granddaughters, a brother Bernard Smith, Fulda, MN; a sister Veronica Friel, Burlingame, CA, numerous nieces and nephews. Service was Oct. 25 in Denver. Burial was in North St. Mary Cemetery in Walsenburg.

Harl, Billie Elizabeth
Billie Elizabeth Harl - Pueblo Chieftain - September 30, 1998 - Billie Elizabeth Harl, a lifelong Pueblo resident, passed away Sept. 27, 1998. She retired as the director of General Accounting at Colorado State Hospital in 1972. She was a member of the First Baptist Church, Colorado Association of Public Employees, a life member of the Rosemount Victorian House Museum and a board member of the Chamberlin Foundation. Mrs. Harl was preceded in death by her husband, Wilford Harl in 1969, and a nephew, Thomas Stokoe in 1997. She is survived by a niece, Carol Spencer- sister-in-law, Ruby Rudolph- cousins, Irene and Ted Sillox, all of Pueblo- great nieces and nephews, Bob Spencer of Oregon, Susan Schmitt of Kansas, Marcy Spencer of Oklahoma, Warren Stokoe of Denver, Randy Stokoe of Winter Park, Rick Stokoe and Dan Stokoe, both of Denver- her very dear friends, Dave Kuker, Roberta Thomison and Dave Van Dyke- and her caregivers, Mary Roldan, Ellie Romero and Roberta Gonzales. Mrs. Hall will lie in state from noon until 7 p.m. on Thursday at the mortuary. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 2, 1998, in the Davis Memorial Chapel with Rev. James Harley, of the First Baptist Church, officiating. Interment will follow in the Roselawn Cemetery. Those wishing to do so are asked to make contributions to the Rosemount Museum or to the Sangre de Cristo Hospice. Donations may be made direct or through the mortuary.

Harlan, John
John Harlan - Colorado Daily Chieftain - January 30, 1875 - John Harlan, a well known Denver typo, was murdered a few nights since in that city, having been mistaken for a burglar. Harlan was intoxicated at the time.

Harlan, Lelah Marion
Lelah Marion Harlan - Pueblo Chieftain - December 19, 2003 - Lelah Marion Harlan, 92, went to be with the Lord on Dec. 17, 2003. She is preceded in death by her brother, G. Clifford Willey; and her parents, Morton Booth and Lelah May (Keen) Willey. She is survived by her husband of 66 years, James Clifford Harlan; two children; her son, James Clifford (Marie DeNiro) Harlan Jr. of Windsor, England; and her daughter, Janis Lee (Bill D.) Burnett of Pueblo; seven grandchildren, Tiare, Nicola, Jamie, C.T., Matthew, Billy and Shawn; 12 great-grandchildren; her sister, Abigail Elizabeth Foster; numerous nieces, nephews, and other relatives. Lelah Marion was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, sister and friend; and was a member of Bethel United Methodist Church. A memorial service will be held in her honor at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 20, 2003, at Adrian Comer Garden Chapel. Donations may be made to the Macular Degeneration Association in care of the funeral home office.

Harley, J. Philip
J. Philip "Phil" Harley - Pueblo Chieftain - July 27, 2004 - J. Philip "Phil" Harley, 51, passed away July 24, 2004. Survived by his wife, Nora Harley of the family home; parents, Pastor James and Carolyn Harley of Pueblo; children, Jessica Harley, Michael Harley, both of Pueblo, Jennifer (Allan Kittle) Harley of Denver, Kimberly (Jeremy) Richards of Omaha, Neb., and Megan Harley of Pueblo; brothers, Keith Harley of Boulder, Colo., and John Harley of Beulah, Colo.; and grandchildren, Katelynn and Brandon Harley. Phil was born Nov. 1, 1952, in Louisville, Ky. He was the South East Asia operations manager for Halliburton. He was dedicated to his family, work and the well-being of his employees and fought for them. Phil loved music, movies and world cuisine. He enjoyed the outdoors, boating and especially trout fishing. He was an avid Colorado sports fan and always followed the Broncos and Avs. Phil was well-read and well-traveled. His favorite expression was, "I saw and experienced enough in this world for two lifetimes." There will be no viewing. Cremation, Montgomery & Steward Crematorium. Memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, July 28, 2004, at First Baptist Church, 9th and Grand, with Pastor Wayne Dvirnak and Pastor James Harley officiating. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to LaGente Organization, through the funeral home.

Harman, Ivan D.
Ivan D. Harman - Pueblo Chieftain - October 15, 1986 - Ivan D. Harman, 74, formerly of Las Animas, died Monday, Oct. 13, 1986, at Seneca Nursing Home, Waterloo, N.Y. Mr. Harman worked at the Las Animas Light and Power Co. as a plant operator for more than 20 years. He married Arthola Ruth Bloyd, May 10, 1935, in Lamar. She preceded him in death, May 17, 1951. Survived by son, Dr. Gary Harman, Geneva, N.Y.; daughter, De Ann (James) Bishopp, Tucson, Ariz.; one sister, Mrs. Robert (Evelyn) Gilbert, Lamar; and five grandchildren. Funeral service, 1:30 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church. Final interment, Fairmount Cemetery, Lamar. The family suggests contributions be made to First Baptist Church, Las Animas.

Harman, John Bright
John Bright Harman - Pueblo Chieftain - February 25, 1928 - John Bright Harman, age 60 years, died at a local hospital Thursday evening. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Sarah Evans Harman, one daughter, R. Mildred Harman; one son, Myron Evans Harman, two sisters, Mrs. John V. Patten of Sycamore, Illinois and Mrs. Lockhart Lortie of Topeka, Kansas, a brother, Colfax Harman, of Kansas City, Kans. Mr. Harman was a member of Pueblo Lodge No. 17, A.F.&A.M. and Woodman of the World here. Funeral services will take place at 1:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon from the chapel of the Davis Mortuary, after which complying with the desires of the deceased, the body will be forwarded to Denver for cremation.

Harman, Leonard J.
Leonard J. Harman - Pueblo Chieftain - September 29, 1997 - Leonard J. Harman passed away Sept. 27, 1997. He is survived by his wife, Betty, of the family home- sister-in-law, Mitzi Gianetti, Pueblo- brothers-in-law, Michael (Ben) Dolinar Jr., Grand Junction, George Simony, Pueblo- brothers, Clifford (Gerry) Harman, California, Claude Harman, Littleton- sister, Geraldine (Dave) Keyes, Pueblo- two nieces and a nephew. He was a member of B.P.O.E. No. 90. Private services with entombment at Roselawn Cemetery. Family requests no food or flowers. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Arrangements by McCarthy Rose Chapel, 329 Goodnight.

Harmes, Albert J.
Albert J. Harmes - Pueblo Chieftain - September 29, 1987 - Albert J. Harmes, 85, late of 2618 Minnequa, passed away Sept. 26, 1987. A Pueblo resident since 1953, and formerly of Walsenburg. He was a coal miner for 30 years. Survived by his wife, Clorinda Harmes; his children, Joanne (Paul) Elder of Colorado Springs; Pearl Wilburn of Pueblo; Charlie Harmes and Bobby (Gerri) Harmes, both of California; and Debbie (Joe) Montoya of Fort Lupton; nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Brother of Julia Amedei of Pueblo; nephew, Edward Harmes, and other nephews and nieces also survive. Rosary recitation, 7 p.m. Tuesday and Mass of Christian Burial, 2 p.m. Wednesday. Both services at St. Joseph Church. Interment at Roselawn Cemetery. Family will receive friends and relatives at 2618 Minnequa.

Harmes, Antonio R.
Antonio R. (Tony) Harmes - Huerfano World - June 23, 1988 - Antonio R. (Tony) Harmes, 76, died June 20, 1988 in Huerfano County Hospital after a lengthy illness. Born Sept. 22, 1911, in Gardner to Clem and Demetra Harmes he had lived in Gardner all his life. While ranching in the Gardner area on a part time basis, he worked at the Pueblo Depot Activity for many years. He retired from there in 1966 while still ranching and helping area ranchers. He married the former Maria Padilla in Gardner Jan, 28, 1935. Mr. Harmes was a member of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Gardner. Survivors include his wife, Maria, of the family home; children Robert Harmes and Lydia Martinez, Colorado Springs; Liola Facundo, Houston TX; Kathy La Greca, Pompano Beach, FL; Adam Harmes, Aurora MO; Tony Harmes Jr., Denver; Leroy Harmes, Arthur 'Harmes and Gilbert Harmes Gardner, and Beckie Martinez, Alamosa; 21 grandchildren six great-grandchildren and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Rosary will be at 7 p.m., Friday from Sacred Heart Church. Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10 a.m., Saturday, also at Sacred Heart. Burial will be in Gardner Catholic Cemetery. J.M. Antle Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Harmes, Augusta
Augusta Harmes - Huerfano World - January 22, 1970 - Mrs. Augusta Harmes, of Pueblo, formerly of Walsenburg, died unexpectantly at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Rose Taylor, Tuesday evening. Mrs. Harmes had not been feeling well for about a week. Born at Farisita, Mrs. Harmes was reared there until she was married to the late Charles Harmes, one of Huerfano County's pioneers. Mrs. Harmes lived on the ranch and farm her husband owned at Yellowstone until 1945. After selling the ranch, they moved to Pueblo and bought the Colorado Inn Hotel which Mrs. Harmes operated after the death of her husband until 1959 when her son, Henry R. Harmes, died. Since that time she has lived with her daughter in Pueblo. Mrs. Harmes is survived by two sons, Fred Harmes, of La Veta and Albert Harmes of Pueblo; another daughter, Mrs. Harry Amedei, also of Pueblo; seven grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren, a niece and two nephews. Mass of the Resurrection was offered Saturday from St. Mary Church. Interment was in the Masonic Cemetery. Boies Memorial Chapel was in charge of the arrangements.

Harmes, Charles August
Charles August Harmes - World Independent – July 19, 1950 - Chas. Harmes Died In Pueblo On Monday - It was learned today that Charles August Harmes, former Walsenburg resident, had died on Monday in Pueblo. His closest survivor is his wife, Augusta Harmes. Harmes was a former Huerfano County rancher and stockman and lived in the County for 72 years. For the past five years he had lived in Pueblo where he owned the Colorado Hotel. He was born in Talpa, Colo., on July 30, 1873, and spent his whole lifetime in Colorado, a member of the St. Mary church. In addition to his wife, he is survived by three sons, Henry of Pueblo, Fred of La Veta and Albert of Walsenburg; two daughters, Mrs. Rose Taylor of Pueblo and Mrs. Julia Amidei of Walsenburg and six grandchildren. Funeral arrangements are being taken care of by the Furphy Mortuary and will be announced later.

Harmes, Della
Della Harmes - World Independent - August 28, 1939 - Mrs. Della Harmes Claimed by Death - Mrs. Della Harmes, wife of Albert Harmes, expired Sunday evening at the age of 28. She had been a resident of Walsenburg for the past 12 years, coming here from Clayton, N.M. Besides her husband Albert she is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Francis Randa of Denver, Mrs. Cleo Archuletta and Mrs. Josephine Archuletta of Clayton. Two brothers, Marcelino and Adon Domingues of Clayton, also survive. Rosary services will be held at 7:30 this evening at the Unfug Peet chapel. Funeral services will be held at the mortuary Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. and at St. Mary's church at 10:00 a.m. Burial will be in St. Mary's cemetery at 2:30 p.m.

Harmes, Dora
Dora Harmes - World Independent - April 2, 1956 - Mrs. Dora Harmes, Former Resident, Dies in Denver - Mrs. Dora Harmes, born April 4, 1903, at Redwing, died Saturday in a Denver hospital. Mrs. Harmes was a resident of Huerfano County until moving to Denver 13 years ago. She was the daughter of the late J.F. Cardenas, rancher and farmer here. She is survived by one son, Max of Denver; four brothers, J.D.J. Cardenas of Walsenburg, Solomon of Redwing, Patricio of Montrose and Monico of Fort Collins; by three sisters, Mrs. Felipe Archuleta of Redwing, Mrs. Victor Salazar of Gardner, and Mrs. Fred Harmes of La Veta. Recitation of the Rosary will take place tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. in Furphy Chapel. The funeral will leave Furphy Chapel Wednesday at 8:30 and will proceed to St. Mary Church where Requiem High Mass will be sung at 9 a.m. Interment will be in St. Mary Cemetery. - Dora Harmes - World Independent - April 3, 1956 - Harmes Rosary Recitation Today - Recitation of the Rosary will take place today at 7:00 p.m. in Furphy Chapel for Mrs. Dora Harmes, former Huerfano County resident who died in a Denver hospital March 31. The funeral will leave Furphy Chapel tomorrow at 8:30 a.m. and will proceed to St. Mary Church where Requiem High Mass will be sung at 9:00 a.m. Interment will be in St. Mary Cemetery. Pallbearers will be Victor Salazar, Raymond Vigil, Joe E. Castro, Trivino Talmadge, Pete Garcia and Jake Cordova.

Harmes, Edward F.
Edward "Eddie" F. Harmes - Pueblo Chieftain - November 19, 2005 - Edward "Eddie" F. Harmes, 75, formerly of Huerfano County and Pueblo, went to be with the Lord on Nov. 17, 2005. He was preceded in death by his parents, Fred and Monica Harmes. Eddie is survived by his loving wife of 51 years, Rosalie Harmes; children, Arnold "A.J." Harmes, James (Marie) Harmes, Karen Harmes, George Harmes, Nancy (Paul) Rowe and Monica (Jeremy) Elizando; loving grandfather to Rick and Stacy Harmes, Liberty, Harrison and Nicholas Rowe, Hunter and Noah Elizando. Eddie retired from the CF&I and was a longtime musician. He played the sax, guitar and other instruments. He was a member of St. Patrick Parish. Eddie loved a good conversation and was happy to "shoot the bull" with old friends and new ones. He will be greatly missed by his friends, family and his little pal, Riley. Via Con Dios, Papa. Viewing, 1 to 5 p.m. today, and 1 to 7 p.m. Sunday, with the vigil service to follow, all at Romero Chapel. Funeral Mass, 11 a.m. Monday, Our Lady of the Assumption Church. Interment to follow at Imperial Cemetery. Relatives and friends will be received at Romero Courtesy Hall after both services. Military honors by the Pueblo Veterans Ritual Team.

Harmes, Fannie
Fannie Harmes - World Independent July 3, 1925 - Daughter Of Justice Of Peace Dies At Pueblo - Mrs. Fannie Harmes, daughter of Justice of the Peace Luz Gonzales, of this city, died at a hospital at Pueblo Tuesday following a long illness. She had been an invalid at the hospital for 14 years. Mrs. Harmes was born and raised in this city and attended the city schools. She was well known among the Spanish-American people of this community. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon here. She was buried in the Catholic cemetery. Mrs. Harmes is survived by a daughter, Piedad, 10 [?]years old, of Talpa; her father, Lus Gonzales; two sisters, Mrs. Andrew Glaves and Mrs. Phil N. Read; six brothers. Lazaro, Robert and Luz of this county; Tony, Los Angeles; Oscara, Nevada, and Evaristo of Salt Lake City.

Harmes, Fred G.
Fred G. Harmes - Huerfano World - June 21, 1979 - La Veta Rancher Fred G. Harmes, who was instrumental in the building of Christ the King Church in La Veta, died Friday, June 15, 1979, in Pueblo. Mass of Christian Burial was said on Tuesday at St. Mary Church in Walsenburg. Rosaries were said in Pueblo and Walsenburg on Sunday and Monday and burial was in North St. Mary Cemetery. Survivors include his wife, Monjca, La Veta; a son, Eddie, Pueblo, two sisters, Mrs. Rose Taylor and Mrs. Julia Amedel, Pueblo; a brother, Albert, Pueblo; six grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Boies Almont was in charge of local arrangements.

Harmes, Fritz C.
Fritz C. Harmes - World Independent - April 8, 1949 - Fritz C. Harmes Dies in Pueblo - Fritz C. Harmes, 67, lifetime resident of Huerfano County, died in a Pueblo Hospital this morning, following a lengthy illness. He was born May 23, 1881 at Talpa (Farisita area) Colo. Harmes is survived by three brothers, Charles of Pueblo, William of Milwaukee, Wis., Gus of Oakland, Calif.; and one sister, Mrs. Emma Sears of Santa Cruz, Calif. Funeral services are to be announced later by Furphy mortuary.

Harmes, Henry L.
Henry "Hank" Harmes - Pueblo Chieftain - November 02, 2001 - Henry L. Harmes went to be with the Lord Oct. 31, 2001. He was preceded in death by his mother and father, Louis and Lucia Harmes; and nephew, Ricardo Lopez. He is survived by brothers and sisters, Bill (Ida) Harmes of Penrose, Clem (Jean) Harmes, Sadie (Richard) Lopez and Terri Harmes, all of Pueblo; nieces and nephews, Terri, Leslie, D.J., Lisa, Carol, Joline, Maria, Clem, Dawn, Mindy, Jennifer, Chris and Lucy. Henry was a veteran of the U.S. Army, a movie buff, and spent the last couple of years happily enjoying his two special grand-nieces, Alyza and Mya. Recitation of Rosary, followed by Mass of Christian burial, will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, Nov. 2, 2001, St. Leander Catholic Church.

Harmes, Henry R.
Henry R. Harmes - World Independent – April 26, 1959 - Ex-Walsenburg Man Succumbs in Pueblo - Henry R. Harmes, a former resident of Walsenburg, died Tuesday night in Pueblo following a six-month illness. He was 63. Mr. Harmes was born in Walsenburg and brought up here before becoming a farmer. He had lived in Pueblo since 1945. Survivors include his mother, Mrs. Augusta Harmes; two brothers, Albert Harmes and Fred Harmes; and two sisters, Mrs. Julia Amedei and Mrs. Rose Taylor, all of Pueblo. Funeral arrangements are being handled by Burress Memorial Chapel here. Burial will be in the Masonic cemetery.

Harmes, John P. Sr.
John P. Harmes - Rocky Mountain News - April 30, 1993 - John P. Harmes, 65, of Denver died April 23 at home. Services were April 27 in Holy Trinity Catholic Church. Burial was in Mount Olivet Cemetery. Mr. Harmes was born in Walsenburg. He worked 35 years for the Colorado and Southern and Burlington Northern railroads. Mr. Harmes served in the Merchant Marine during World War II and in the Army during the Korean War. He is survived by his wife, Esther; four sons, John Jr., Steven and Glenn, all of Denver, and James of Trinidad; one daughter, Eva of Denver; one sister, Berlina Prado; one brother, Charles, both of Denver; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Contributions: Holy Trinity Catholic Church and School, 7595 Federal Blvd., Westminster 80030.

Harmes, Louis (Mrs.)
Mrs. Louis Harmes - World Independent - March 25, 1936 - Illness is Fatal To Pioneer Resident, Mrs. Louis Harmes - Resided at Farisita Since 1879; Funeral Plans Be Made Later Mrs. Don Louis Harmes, 67, died last night in a Denver hospital following an illness of several months. She and her husband resided at Farisita where she had moved in 1879. No funeral arrangements had been made this morning. The body will arrive in Walsenburg tonight and will be taken in charge by the Furphy Brothers mortuary. The deceased was born at Rito, N.M. in 1869, was married in 1883. Following are her survivors: Her husband, two sons, Adolph, of Walsenburg, Clement, of Gardner; five daughters, Mrs. Patrovinno Quintana, Farisita, Mrs. Hoernick, Farisita, Mrs. Gasper Martinez, Walsenburg, Mrs. Demetrio Cordova, and Miss Margarita Harmes both of Walsenburg.

Harmes, Louis N.
Louis N. Harmes - World Independent - October 17, 1944 - Louis N. Harmes, a well known resident of this county for 51 years, died in a Denver hospital last week at the age of 84 years. He was a retired farmer. Harmes was born Nov. 22, 1860 at Taos, N.M. and came to Colorado in his early teens, settling first at Colorado Springs. Later, he moved to Talpa, now known as Farisita, where he engaged in farming and stock-raising. He is survived by six daughters, Mrs. Pat Quintana of Farisita, Mrs. Demetro Cordova of Walsenburg; Mrs. August Hoernicke of Denver; Mrs. Gasper Martinez of Denver; Mrs. Tony Bravo of Red Wing; and Margaret Harmes of Denver. Also by two sons, Clem Harmes of Gardner and Herbert Harmes of Denver. Funeral arrangements will be announced later from Denver.

Harmes, Lucy
Miss Lucy Harmes - Walsenburg Independent – February 7, 1919 - Died at her home on west 6th street, of heart trouble, at the age of 13 years, Miss Lucy Harmes, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Wm. Harmes.

Harmes, William L.
William L. Harmes - La Veta Advertiser - December 17, 1898 - Word was received in town yesterday that W.L. Harmes had been accidentally shot and killed at his home at Talpa in this county. The particulars were meager, but so far as could be learned his son, August, was twirling a loaded revolver around one of his fingers when it was accidentally discharged and the bullet struck Mr. Harmes, who was sitting down in the store reading, in the forehead over one eye and penetrated the skull lodging in the back of his head. At the time of his death Mr. Harmes was 65 years old and was a prominent citizen of Huerfano County. He leaves a wife and family who with many friends of the deceased mourn his death.

Harmes-Armijo, Joel William
Joel William Harmes-Armijo - Pueblo Chieftain - August 21, 2005 - Joel William Harmes-Armijo was stillborn August 3, 2005 at William Newton Hospital. Survivors include Joel's parents, Molly Harms and Harold Armijo, Winfield Kan.; his grandparents, Teresa and Doug Myatt, Winfield; Gail and David Harms, Brenham, Texas; Carmen and Harold Armijo, Pueblo; aunts and uncles; Kerby, Angeline, Mary, Thomas, Samantha, Robyn, Carrie, Max, Rodette, Luke and Pamela, Julia and Jaqui. Private family service was held in Winfield Kan. August 5, 2005. Memorials to American Diabetes Association.

Harmon, Beulah
Beulah Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - November 10, 1997 - Beulah Harmon, 82, passed away November 1997. Preceded in death by her husband, George- son, Jack- two brothers- two sisters- granddaughter, Kristy- and great-grandson, Jacob. Survived by children, June (Cliff) Belport, Carol Roberts, Max (Donna) Harmon, Linda Luchetta, LeRoy (Elaine) Doudy- brothers, L.O. (Pat) Johnson, Bud (Doris) Johnson, Russell (Connie) Johnson, Merit (Margo) Johnson- several grandchildren- great-grandchildren- great-great-grandchildren- and good friend, Pat Friend. Viewing, noon to 8 p.m. Monday. Funeral service, 2 p.m. Tuesday at Imperial Funeral Home. Interment, Imperial Memorial Gardens.

Harmon, David
David Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - November 21, 1999 - David Harmon passed away Nov. 19, 1999, in Pueblo. Cremation, Montgomery & Steward Crematorium. Services will be held in Estes Park, Colo.

Harmon, George Burton
George Burton Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - July 31, 1987 - George Burton Harmon, late of Pueblo, died July 30, 1987, at a local hospital. Survived by his wife, Beulah Harmon of the family home; son, Max (Donna) Harmon and grandson, Craig Harmon, all of Pueblo. Born Oct. 17, 1917, in-Holyoke, Colo. Pueblo resident for 47 years. Mr. Harmon worked at the PAD in disarmament, retiring in 1968. Veteran of the U.S. Navy Seabees. At his request, no services. Cremation, Davis-Wallin Crematorium.

Harmon, Jay C.
Jay C. Harmon - Valley Morning Star – April 22, 2005 – Harlingen, Texas - Jay C. Harmon, 62, of Cuchara, CO, and formerly of Harlingen, passed away April 17, 2005. He was retired from South Point Nursery, was a US Army Captain and Texas A&I graduate. He loved golf, hunting, snow skiing and farming. Survivors include his wife, Sandra Perkins Harmon; daughter, Sherilyn H. Goad; son, Major Craig M. Harmon; and 4 grandchildren. Memorial service will be held on Friday, April 22, 2005 at 4 p.m. at the Central Christian Church in Brownsville, with graveside services on Saturday, April 23, 2005 in Goliad County at the Sarco Cemetery. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Colonial Funeral Home, P.O. Box 910 - 214 N. Market Street, Goliad, Texas 77963. 361-645-3216

Harmon, Josephine
Josephine Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - February 03, 2006 - Josephine Harmon, 76, died at home on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2006. She was born in Brazil, Ind., on Feb. 2, 1929, to the late Frank and Elizabeth Morris. She graduated from Central High School in 1947. Jo was preceded in death by her loving husband, Curtis; brothers, Frank and Sanford. Survived by her children, Brenda, Curtis and Jody; and grandson, Morgan. Josephine loved to sing and “bowl a few lines.” The family would like to thank the Pueblo Police Department and ACOVA for their kindness and caring. Private service and inurnment at Roselawn Cemetery and Funeral Home.

Harmon, Kyle J.
Kyle J. Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - February 22, 2005 - Kyle J. Harmon passed away Feb. 16, 2005. Services will be held in Glen Allen, Va., later this week.

Harmon, Leslie U.
Leslie U. “Pete” Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - January 26, 2004 - Leslie U. “Pete” Harmon, age 96, passed away at his home in Canon City, Colo., Jan. 6, 2004. He was born to William A. and Eva Lorena Harmon, July 8, 1907 at Webb City, Mo. Preceded in death by his parents, his wife and helpmate of 68 years, Cora, four brothers, Ross, Roy, Floyd and Clyde and a sister, Ethel May. He is survived by brother, Clifford of Casa Grande, Ariz. and sisters, Wauneta Holdern of S.D. and Dicie Randle of Broomfield, Colo. Also surviving are children, Patricia Cochran of Goodland, Kan., Forrest Harmon of Quartzside, Ariz. and Iris Harmon of Canon City, five grandchildren, Mark Cochran, Sherry Haugen, Mike Cochran, Mitch Harmon and Ross Harmon, six great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Leslie was a very progressive farmer, rancher and businessman. He spent his early years farming in western Kansas. He owned and operated ranches at Gunnison, Colo. and Kit Carson, Colo. and also owned land at Center, Colo., orchard land at the tip of Texas and a ranch on the Laramie River in Wyoming. Businesses included International Harvester Implements, motels and a restaurant. Leslie loved farming. He enjoyed his horses and cattle and often went big game hunting. He always had a helping hand extended for family, friends and neighbors. He will be missed and remembered for numerous acts of thoughtfulness and kindness. Leslie spent his last years at Scott City, Kansas, Paonia, Colo. and Canon City. He was laid to rest at Lakeside Cemetery in Canon City.

Harmon, Lizzie
Lizzie Harmon – Pueblo Colorado Weekly Chieftain – November 27, 1879 – Lizzie Harmon, a variety actress, well known in Colorado and California, died penniless in Leadville a few days ago, and was buried by the members of the profession.

Harmon, O. Dale
O. Dale Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - January 27, 2005 - O. Dale Harmon, 86, passed away Jan. 24, 2005. Survived by his wife, June Newhard Harmon of the family home in Rye; son, James (Rosa) Harmon of Osprey, Fla.; stepchildren, Carol (Kelly) McCann of Henderson, Nev., Lee (Judy) Newhard of Pueblo, and Rande Newhard of Greeley, Colo.; sister-in-law, Virginia (Bill) Vail of Pueblo; eight grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by his first wife, Ruth E. Harmon in 1990. Dale was born to Clifford and Stella Harmon on Oct. 20, 1918, in Ordway, Colo., and lived throughout southern Colorado his whole life, moving most recently to Rye in 2001. He retired from the CF&I as a storehouse manager in 1978, after 37 years of service. Dale enjoyed woodworking and was a member of Rye United Methodist Church, BPO Elks Lodge No. 90 and Eagles Aerie No. 145. Dale also was a longtime volunteer for Parkview Medical Center. As per his request, there will be no viewing. Memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 28, 2005, at Rye United Methodist Church with Pastor Emily Earnshaw officiating. Private family interment at Mountain View Cemetery. In lieu of food and flowers, memorials may be made to the Ruth E. Harmon Scholarship Fund at Parkview Foundation or Rye United Methodist Church through the funeral home. Family may be reached at the home of Virginia and Bill Vail, 10 Towerbridge.

Harmon, Otis Loyd
Otis Loyd Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - August 29, 2000 - Otis Loyd Harmon, born in Oberlin, Kan., on Feb. 10, 1924, to Charlie Clayton and Katie O. Harmon, passed away Aug. 25, 2000, at Fort Lyon Medical Center following a lengthy illness. Mr. Harmon served his country overseas in the U.S. Navy during World War II. After his term in the military, he held such interesting jobs as being a cropduster and training greyhounds, from Florida to Colorado. In later years, he worked in home improvement and became a member of the VFW Post No. 3641 for over 25 years. Mr. Harmon was preceded in death by his parents, four brothers and five sisters. He is survived by two sisters, Dova Miller of Pueblo and Carol Krizek of McCook, Neb., as well as many nieces and nephews. Graveside service will be 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2000, in the VFW Section of Roselawn Cemetery with military honors by the Pueblo Veterans Ritual Team. Dova Miller and Carol Krizek would like to thank all the personnel at the hospital for their kindness and help at a time when needed most.

Harmon, Robert Ray
Robert Ray Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - December 17, 2001 - Robert Ray Harmon, 50, of Pueblo, passed away Dec. 15, 2001. Preceded in death by his mother, Norma Jean Harmon. Survived by wife, Marcia; daughter, Erica; father, Bob W. Harmon; and brother, Reggie Harmon. Robert was a sergeant at the Department of Corrections as well as a Vietnam veteran. At the family's request, no viewing. Graveside service, 1 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2001, at Fort Logan National Cemetery in Denver.

Harmon, Ruth A.
Ruth A. Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - March 14, 2000 - Ruth A. Harmon, 91, passed away March 10, 2000. She is preceded in death by her loving husband, Roy Harmon; and son, Mel Harmon. She is survived by her daughter, Nadine Forgy; and grandsons Dale (Pat) Forgy and Michael (Deborah) Forgy. She is best remembered through these words: "When I come to the end of the road and the sun has set for me, I want no rites in a gloom filled room, why cry for a soul set free? Miss me a little, but not too long, and not with your head bowed low. Remember the love that we once shared, miss but let me go. For this journey that we all must take and each must go alone, it's all a part of the Master's plan, a step on the road to home. When you are lonely and sick of heart, go to the friends we know and bury your sorrows in doing good deeds. Miss me --- but let me go." She will be sadly missed by her loving family. A graveside service will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 14, at Imperial Memorial Gardens. The family respectfully requests the omission of food and flowers.

Harmon, Theron B.
Theron B. “Cy” Harmon - Pueblo Chieftain - September 23, 2004 - Theron B. “Cy” Harmon, 86, entered into eternal rest on Sept. 20, 2004. He is preceded in death by his parents, Hiram and Argyle Harmon; first wife, Margaret “Macie” Harmon in 1988; brother, Gardner Harmon. Cy is survived by his wife, Lillian Harmon; son, Patrick Harmon of Valrico, Fla.; daughters, Mary Ann Mellies of Ness City, Kan., and Lt. Col. Sue Ellen Harmon of San Antonio, Texas; niece, Judy Cleveland of Kansas City, Mo.; five grandchildren; one great-grandchild. Cy served in the Army during World War II on Atu, in the Aleutian Islands. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial contributions be made to the Custer County Library through the funeral home. Memorial service, 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 25, 2004, at the Pueblo Regent Retirement Residence, 100 San Carlos Road. Inurnment to follow at Rosita Cemetery in Westcliffe, Colo., with military honors to be presented by the Fort Carson Honor Guard.



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